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By Dave Rosenthal | November 8, 2012
Now that President Barack Obama has shaken off a challenge by Republican Mitt Romney and secured a second term in the White House, he apparently has lots of time on his hands. Time enough, anyway, to collaborate on a book with noted Holocaust survivor and Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel. According to news reports from Israel, the president was a student at Occidental College when he first heard Wiesel speak. They bonded years later, during the president's visit to the site of the Buchenwald concentration camp, where Wiesel has been interned.
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NEWS
March 11, 2014
My wife of 46 years is French, and as a result I have spent a lot of time in France and ridden the SNCF rails in France. I have a brother-in-law who was a SNCF engineer. So seeing the acronym in a recent article, I wondered why someone was publicly singling out French complicity in German-instigated atrocities, especially since the French were not the only Europeans to have done so. Having read Alain Leray's recent commentary, I now see why SNCF has become a subject of such interest ( "SNCF: Holocaust legislation is discriminatory," March 10)
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By Hans Knight and Hans Knight,Special to the Sun | November 21, 1999
"And the Sea is Never Full," by Elie Wiesel. Alfred A. Knopf. 384 pages. $30.This is the story of a man haunted by ghosts, and driven by a mission: To give voice to those who can no longer speak, to lend vision to those who no longer see. They are the special victims of the Holocaust.Of all the survivors, of all the witnesses, none has jolted the world's often somnolent memory more implacably than Elie Wiesel. "I am fascinated by everything that touches on memory, its mystical force," he writes in this, the second volume of his autobiography.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | November 8, 2012
Now that President Barack Obama has shaken off a challenge by Republican Mitt Romney and secured a second term in the White House, he apparently has lots of time on his hands. Time enough, anyway, to collaborate on a book with noted Holocaust survivor and Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel. According to news reports from Israel, the president was a student at Occidental College when he first heard Wiesel speak. They bonded years later, during the president's visit to the site of the Buchenwald concentration camp, where Wiesel has been interned.
NEWS
By Edwin Diamond and Edwin Diamond,Special to the sun | December 3, 1995
"All Rivers Run to the Sea," by Elie Wiesel. Knopf. 432 pages. $30 In 1954, almost 10 years after Elie Wiesel was liberated by American troops from Buchenwald, he began his first book, "Night," about what he calls "my concentration camp years." Mr. Wiesel was 26 when he wrote it.He grew up fast. Before his 16th birthday, he and his family were rounded up from their Carpathian mountains village by German troops. Mr. Wiesel was separated from his mother and three sisters by the simple SS command: Men on one side, women on the other.
NEWS
By Arnold Ages | March 22, 1992
SAGES AND DREAMERS:BIBLICAL, TALMUDIC, ANDHASIDIC PORTRAITSAND LEGENDS.Elie Wiesel.Summit.443 pages. $25.Elie Wiesel, the Nobel peace laureate, stands in the distinguished tradition of Jewish scholars ready to share their learning with the masses. His current volume -- a compendium of Rabbinic lore on Biblical, Talmudic (post-Biblical) and Hasidic (Jewish mystics) material -- is an encyclopedic survey of personalities, movements and theological ideas spanning more than 2,000 years of Jewish history.
FEATURES
By ARNOLD AGES | September 23, 1990
From the Kingdomof Memory Reminiscences.Elie Wiesel.Summit.213 pages. $19.95.In more than two dozen novels and nonfiction books, Elie Wiesel consistently stresses two messages. The first is the need to testify, as a survivor, about the Holocaust and the depredations it visited upon the Jewish people. The second is that universalism must be rooted in a parochial experience, in being true to one's origins. Virtually all of his themes are subsumed under these two ideas.Readers of Mr. Wiesel will recognize in his new book images he has conjured up in previous works -- a pious childhood and adolescence in the Hasidic ambience of Sighet, Transylvania; the seismic changes in his life when the Nazis sent the inhabitants of his town to Auschwitz; Yiddish writers who pledged their troth to Stalin; visits to the Soviet Union, and confrontations with death at the site of concentration camps.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | December 7, 1992
Nobel Peace Prize laureate Elie Wiesel, in Baltimore briefly yesterday to celebrate the 90th birthday of a friend, spoke pessimistically about world events and mankind's prospects in the next century but optimistically about the survival of Judaism.He described Bosnia-Herzegovina, which he visited last week on a discouraging mission of peace, as a place not only of devastation but of near hopelessness. Sarajevo, he said, "is a city which today symbolizes isolation . . . and total abandonment."
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1998
Louis L. Kaplan wasn't waiting for his Festschrift, probably hadn't even been thinking about it. So when Jack Fruchtman Jr. showed him the blue-bound book full of essays, written in Kaplan's honor by people famous and not so famous, he seemed genuinely surprised."
NEWS
April 17, 2005
Convocation set tomorrow to honor Elie Wiesel Holocaust survivor and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Elie Wiesel will be at McDaniel College tomorrow to meet with students in an informal seminar at 4 p.m. and to accept an honorary degree during a convocation and address at 7:30 p.m. In honor of Wiesel's visit, the college will observe Human Rights Day on Monday. Those attending the convocation will receive a bookmark listing ways everyone can promote human rights and social justice. The convocation is by invitation only.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur M. Lesley and Arthur M. Lesley,Special to the Sun | August 21, 2005
NOVEL THE TIME OF THE UPROOTED By Elie Wiesel, translated by David Hapgood. Alfred A. Knopf. 320 pages. The Time of the Uprooted is Elie Wiesel's 13th novel since Night, his stunning memoir of Auschwitz that helped to establish Holocaust literature in Western languages. Wiesel's strongest novels confronted acute moral problems that the Holocaust made urgent. The Gates of the Forest, The Town Beyond the Wall and Dawn were taut and innovative, in the early '60's, when they subordinated the events and feelings to an intellectual struggle with new varieties of perversity.
NEWS
April 17, 2005
Convocation set tomorrow to honor Elie Wiesel Holocaust survivor and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Elie Wiesel will be at McDaniel College tomorrow to meet with students in an informal seminar at 4 p.m. and to accept an honorary degree during a convocation and address at 7:30 p.m. In honor of Wiesel's visit, the college will observe Human Rights Day on Monday. Those attending the convocation will receive a bookmark listing ways everyone can promote human rights and social justice. The convocation is by invitation only.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
COMING UP He's a Nobel Peace Prize winner. A respected author and speaker. A Boston University professor. A Holocaust survivor. He's Elie Wiesel. And he'll be speaking at the Yeshivat Rambam school's 14th anniversary event Sunday at the Lyric Opera House. "An Evening With Nobel Prize Laureate Elie Wiesel" features an uplifting talk by Wiesel, who will discuss his belief that through faith and hope, human beings can overcome and survive any and all obstacles. The evening will include tributes to noted supporters of the school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Pride and By Mike Pride,Special to the Sun | August 25, 2002
The Judges, by Elie Wiesel. Alfred A. Knopf, 224 pages, $24. Right and wrong. Truth and lies. Good and evil. Life and death. The reader can forgive Elie Wiesel, Holocaust survivor and Nobel Peace Prize winner, his obsession with the great moral questions of human existence. Indeed, it is sad to contemplate the path of Wiesel's career. Here is a man who established his literary reputation with a memoir of his experience in a Nazi concentration camp nearly 60 years ago. Yet still today, his pen must engage a world in which Jews are killed simply because they are Jews and, in an equation favoring their enemies, they kill in return.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Hans Knight and Hans Knight,Special to the Sun | November 21, 1999
"And the Sea is Never Full," by Elie Wiesel. Alfred A. Knopf. 384 pages. $30.This is the story of a man haunted by ghosts, and driven by a mission: To give voice to those who can no longer speak, to lend vision to those who no longer see. They are the special victims of the Holocaust.Of all the survivors, of all the witnesses, none has jolted the world's often somnolent memory more implacably than Elie Wiesel. "I am fascinated by everything that touches on memory, its mystical force," he writes in this, the second volume of his autobiography.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg | November 22, 1998
Who (or what) do you think is better qualified to predict events of the coming millennium?A. Kato KaelinB. A TV dinnerIf you answered B, you are right.If you answered A, you should pick up a copy of "Predictions for the Next Millennium."In their new book (Andrews McMeel Publishing, $18.95), sales and marketing guys David Kristof and Todd W. Nickerson, founders of the Millennium Committee of New York, felt the need to ask the pool boy turned pop curiosity what he thought lay ahead for humanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
COMING UP He's a Nobel Peace Prize winner. A respected author and speaker. A Boston University professor. A Holocaust survivor. He's Elie Wiesel. And he'll be speaking at the Yeshivat Rambam school's 14th anniversary event Sunday at the Lyric Opera House. "An Evening With Nobel Prize Laureate Elie Wiesel" features an uplifting talk by Wiesel, who will discuss his belief that through faith and hope, human beings can overcome and survive any and all obstacles. The evening will include tributes to noted supporters of the school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Pride and By Mike Pride,Special to the Sun | August 25, 2002
The Judges, by Elie Wiesel. Alfred A. Knopf, 224 pages, $24. Right and wrong. Truth and lies. Good and evil. Life and death. The reader can forgive Elie Wiesel, Holocaust survivor and Nobel Peace Prize winner, his obsession with the great moral questions of human existence. Indeed, it is sad to contemplate the path of Wiesel's career. Here is a man who established his literary reputation with a memoir of his experience in a Nazi concentration camp nearly 60 years ago. Yet still today, his pen must engage a world in which Jews are killed simply because they are Jews and, in an equation favoring their enemies, they kill in return.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1998
Louis L. Kaplan wasn't waiting for his Festschrift, probably hadn't even been thinking about it. So when Jack Fruchtman Jr. showed him the blue-bound book full of essays, written in Kaplan's honor by people famous and not so famous, he seemed genuinely surprised."
NEWS
By Edwin Diamond and Edwin Diamond,Special to the sun | December 3, 1995
"All Rivers Run to the Sea," by Elie Wiesel. Knopf. 432 pages. $30 In 1954, almost 10 years after Elie Wiesel was liberated by American troops from Buchenwald, he began his first book, "Night," about what he calls "my concentration camp years." Mr. Wiesel was 26 when he wrote it.He grew up fast. Before his 16th birthday, he and his family were rounded up from their Carpathian mountains village by German troops. Mr. Wiesel was separated from his mother and three sisters by the simple SS command: Men on one side, women on the other.
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