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Elia Kazan

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By Mervyn Rothstein and Mervyn Rothstein,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 2003
Elia Kazan, the immigrant child of a Greek rug merchant who became one of the most honored and influential directors in Broadway and Hollywood history, died yesterday at his home in New York. He was 94. Kazan's achievements in theater and cinema helped define the American experience for more than a generation. For Broadway, his legendary productions included A Streetcar Named Desire, Death of a Salesman, The Skin of Our Teeth, All My Sons, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Sweet Bird of Youth, The Dark at the Top of the Stairs, Tea and Sympathy and J.B. His movie classics include A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, A Streetcar Named Desire, On the Waterfront, Viva Zapata!
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2010
The AFI-Silver's simultaneous tributes to Orson Welles and Elia Kazan celebrate the sizzling theatrical instincts of two creative marvels of the stage who transformed the face — let's make that faces — of American films. Kazan and Marlon Brando forged one of the most influential director-actor partnerships in American movies, but James Dean, too, made his name with Kazan, in the 1955 film version of John Steinbeck's "East of Eden" (Saturday at 4:30 p.m and Sunday at 7:20 p.m.)
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By DAVID CAUTE | November 27, 2005
Elia Kazan: A Biography Richard Schickel HarperCollins / 510 pages From his formative years, Elia Kazan's role models among directors included Stanislavsky, Dovzhenko and the maestros of European expressionism. As a quintessentially American genius of stage and screen, passionately believing in "roots," Kazan unveiled Marlon Brando and James Dean for audiences far beyond America's shores. During his heyday (1930-1960), Kazan virtually re-explored the terrain of John Dos Passos' trilogy, U.S.A.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | July 2, 2009
Karl Malden, an Academy Award-winning actor who excelled in plain-spoken, working-class roles, including the awkward Mitch in A Streetcar Named Desire and a brave priest in On the Waterfront, died Wednesday at his home in Los Angeles. No cause of death was immediately disclosed. He was 97. Mr. Malden's bulbous nose and thinning hair made him one of the most familiar sights in movies and on television for five decades. In the 1970s, he became known to millions of viewers as a police veteran who partners with a young inspector played by Michael Douglas on the ABC drama series The Streets of San Francisco.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | October 5, 2003
Elia Kazan was all about passion. He put it on the screen, he infused his life with it, and he elicited it from all manner of audiences. Few directors have engendered so much controversy in their lifetimes, or hewn so stubbornly to beliefs that, while perhaps not universally popular, were definitely their own. When he died last Sunday at his New York home, Kazan left a legacy that critics and commentators still will be wrestling with decades from now....
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1999
It's hard to deny that Elia Kazan is one of the country's greatest living filmmakers, with a resume that includes "A Streetcar Named Desire," "On the Waterfront," "Splendor in the Grass" and "East of Eden.'But it's just as hard to deny that Kazan's naming of names during the great red hunt of the 1950s damaged several careers and helped legitimize a process that would destroy dozens more. Of the seven actors he named before the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) -- Lewis Leverett, J. Edward Bromberg, Phoebe Brand, Morris Carnovsky, Tony Kraber, Paula Miller and Art Smith -- not one had a career that amounted to more than a minor footnote in stage and movie history.
NEWS
By Joanna Brenner | July 27, 2008
J. Buck Jabaily is the artistic director of the Single Carrot Theatre on North Avenue. Jabaily and his friends founded the theater in Colorado in 2005 when they graduated from college, and they held their first show in Baltimore in January 2007. Jabaily is directing Shakespeare's Richard III, which runs through Aug. 3. "One Hundred Years of Solitude" by Gabriel Garcia Marquez This epic, fueled by Garcia Marquez's towering imagination, has helped free my mind as a director. In his style of magical realism, every whim of the creative mind is to be mined, and this book taught me volumes about following the impulse of your ideas, even if you don't know where they're going to lead.
NEWS
By Marjorie Garber | December 7, 1993
FOR a moment last month it seemed as if the White House, under pressure from conservatives, was about to propose a broad new "child pornography" statute banning some depictions of children even if they are clothed. This would have posed some interesting problems for executives from Coppertone to Calvin Klein.When the Justice Department argued before the Supreme Court that a Pennsylvania man should not be prosecuted for possessing videotapes of young girls because they were clothed and not acting lasciviously, conservative opponents accused President Clinton of being soft on child pornography.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 13, 1999
In a way it's ironic that Elia Kazan is being honored for his achievement in film. Because it was as a theater director that he made his biggest impact on American culture.Kazan brought the work of playwrights Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams and William Inge to life on the stage, most famously with "Death of a Salesman" (1949), "A Streetcar Named Desire" (1947), "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" (1955) and "The Dark at the Top of the Stairs" (1957).In 1931, he co-founded the influential Group Theatre, which was dedicated to bringing work by new, socially conscious writers to the fore.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | July 2, 2009
Karl Malden, an Academy Award-winning actor who excelled in plain-spoken, working-class roles, including the awkward Mitch in A Streetcar Named Desire and a brave priest in On the Waterfront, died Wednesday at his home in Los Angeles. No cause of death was immediately disclosed. He was 97. Mr. Malden's bulbous nose and thinning hair made him one of the most familiar sights in movies and on television for five decades. In the 1970s, he became known to millions of viewers as a police veteran who partners with a young inspector played by Michael Douglas on the ABC drama series The Streets of San Francisco.
NEWS
By Joanna Brenner | July 27, 2008
J. Buck Jabaily is the artistic director of the Single Carrot Theatre on North Avenue. Jabaily and his friends founded the theater in Colorado in 2005 when they graduated from college, and they held their first show in Baltimore in January 2007. Jabaily is directing Shakespeare's Richard III, which runs through Aug. 3. "One Hundred Years of Solitude" by Gabriel Garcia Marquez This epic, fueled by Garcia Marquez's towering imagination, has helped free my mind as a director. In his style of magical realism, every whim of the creative mind is to be mined, and this book taught me volumes about following the impulse of your ideas, even if you don't know where they're going to lead.
NEWS
By DAVID CAUTE | November 27, 2005
Elia Kazan: A Biography Richard Schickel HarperCollins / 510 pages From his formative years, Elia Kazan's role models among directors included Stanislavsky, Dovzhenko and the maestros of European expressionism. As a quintessentially American genius of stage and screen, passionately believing in "roots," Kazan unveiled Marlon Brando and James Dean for audiences far beyond America's shores. During his heyday (1930-1960), Kazan virtually re-explored the terrain of John Dos Passos' trilogy, U.S.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | October 5, 2003
Elia Kazan was all about passion. He put it on the screen, he infused his life with it, and he elicited it from all manner of audiences. Few directors have engendered so much controversy in their lifetimes, or hewn so stubbornly to beliefs that, while perhaps not universally popular, were definitely their own. When he died last Sunday at his New York home, Kazan left a legacy that critics and commentators still will be wrestling with decades from now....
FEATURES
By Mervyn Rothstein and Mervyn Rothstein,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 2003
Elia Kazan, the immigrant child of a Greek rug merchant who became one of the most honored and influential directors in Broadway and Hollywood history, died yesterday at his home in New York. He was 94. Kazan's achievements in theater and cinema helped define the American experience for more than a generation. For Broadway, his legendary productions included A Streetcar Named Desire, Death of a Salesman, The Skin of Our Teeth, All My Sons, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Sweet Bird of Youth, The Dark at the Top of the Stairs, Tea and Sympathy and J.B. His movie classics include A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, A Streetcar Named Desire, On the Waterfront, Viva Zapata!
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2000
Angelina Jolie's reputation as a gal who knows how to celebrate was cemented when she jumped into a pool last year after winning a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress in a TV movie. Yesterday, after taking home an Oscar for her supporting role in "Girl, Interrupted," Jolie said she planned on celebrating just as hard. "I mentioned something to somebody about a roof at the Shrine," she told reporters, "but I'm not sure I can get on it in this dress." Wearing an all-black number that one press-room fashion critic dubbed the "Morticia Addams look," Jolie said she was proud to follow in the footsteps of her father, Oscar winner Jon Voight.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 13, 1999
In a way it's ironic that Elia Kazan is being honored for his achievement in film. Because it was as a theater director that he made his biggest impact on American culture.Kazan brought the work of playwrights Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams and William Inge to life on the stage, most famously with "Death of a Salesman" (1949), "A Streetcar Named Desire" (1947), "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" (1955) and "The Dark at the Top of the Stairs" (1957).In 1931, he co-founded the influential Group Theatre, which was dedicated to bringing work by new, socially conscious writers to the fore.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1996
There's a bit of a war going on in cable-TV land, and the winners appear to be movie lovers everywhere.American Movie Classics (AMC), which for years dominated the vintage-movies niche on cable television, is being challenged by Turner Classic Movies (TCM). The result is a slew of good movies and programmers who keep a wary eye on what the competition is doing, being sure to match their counterparts blow for blow.March is a perfect example of the competition that has developed. TCM, which has the advantage of access to Ted Turner's nearly bottomless pit of old movies, has for several years staged its "31 Days of Oscar" festival.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2000
Angelina Jolie's reputation as a gal who knows how to celebrate was cemented when she jumped into a pool last year after winning a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress in a TV movie. Yesterday, after taking home an Oscar for her supporting role in "Girl, Interrupted," Jolie said she planned on celebrating just as hard. "I mentioned something to somebody about a roof at the Shrine," she told reporters, "but I'm not sure I can get on it in this dress." Wearing an all-black number that one press-room fashion critic dubbed the "Morticia Addams look," Jolie said she was proud to follow in the footsteps of her father, Oscar winner Jon Voight.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1999
It's hard to deny that Elia Kazan is one of the country's greatest living filmmakers, with a resume that includes "A Streetcar Named Desire," "On the Waterfront," "Splendor in the Grass" and "East of Eden.'But it's just as hard to deny that Kazan's naming of names during the great red hunt of the 1950s damaged several careers and helped legitimize a process that would destroy dozens more. Of the seven actors he named before the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) -- Lewis Leverett, J. Edward Bromberg, Phoebe Brand, Morris Carnovsky, Tony Kraber, Paula Miller and Art Smith -- not one had a career that amounted to more than a minor footnote in stage and movie history.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1996
There's a bit of a war going on in cable-TV land, and the winners appear to be movie lovers everywhere.American Movie Classics (AMC), which for years dominated the vintage-movies niche on cable television, is being challenged by Turner Classic Movies (TCM). The result is a slew of good movies and programmers who keep a wary eye on what the competition is doing, being sure to match their counterparts blow for blow.March is a perfect example of the competition that has developed. TCM, which has the advantage of access to Ted Turner's nearly bottomless pit of old movies, has for several years staged its "31 Days of Oscar" festival.
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