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Elevator Music

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ENTERTAINMENT
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
There was a news item in the paper the other day and, after reading it, I slumped in my chair and thought: That's it, now there can be no hope. The news was this: In a final, savage blow to the economy, Muzak, the company that makes elevator music, had filed for bankruptcy. Oh, you go ahead and worry about the Detroit automakers and the greedy banks and shyster mortgage lenders if you want. But if you can't make money producing gooey orchestral arrangements of pop songs anymore, then there is no money to be made, period, and the economy is doomed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
There was a news item in the paper the other day and, after reading it, I slumped in my chair and thought: That's it, now there can be no hope. The news was this: In a final, savage blow to the economy, Muzak, the company that makes elevator music, had filed for bankruptcy. Oh, you go ahead and worry about the Detroit automakers and the greedy banks and shyster mortgage lenders if you want. But if you can't make money producing gooey orchestral arrangements of pop songs anymore, then there is no money to be made, period, and the economy is doomed.
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NEWS
By Larry Atkins | December 6, 2002
PHILADELPHIA -- Even though I'm only 41 years old, there are many signs that I'm starting to get old. My knees ache from arthritis and I limp like Walter Brennan after I try to play basketball. My eyesight and hearing are diminishing, as is my hairline. But perhaps one of the clearest signs that I'm getting older is that the music I grew up listening to has evolved into elevator music. During the past year, while eating at various fast-food restaurants, I've heard Muzak versions of Eric Clapton's "Let It Rain," Jethro Tull's "Bungle in the Jungle" and Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2003
That the musical State Fair gets lost in the Rodgers and Hammerstein canon is hardly a shock, since it's surrounded by the likes of Oklahoma!, Carousel, The King and I, South Pacific and The Sound of Music. But despite being one of the runts of the Rodgers and Hammerstein litter, the musical tale of the Frake family's visit to the Iowa State Fair of 1946 - being presented at the Chesapeake Arts Center in Brooklyn Park in a Merely Players production - is not without its charms. The well-scrubbed, all-American story of blue-ribbon boars, liquor-filled mincemeat and love lost and found on the midway by the two Frake siblings is serviceable enough, and the songs, including "It's a Grand Night for Singing," "It Might As Well Be Spring" and "Isn't It Kinda' Fun" aren't slouchy in the least.
FEATURES
By Fred Shuster and Fred Shuster,Los Angeles Daily News | August 6, 1995
Los Angeles -- Weary of the angst and hand-wringing of alternative rock, a growing number of musical refuseniks have fueled a zany new reissue boom based on easy-listening "elevator music" of the '50s and '60s.The faux-South Pacific instrumentals of Martin Denny, the loopy big-band genius known as Esquivel, and anything with a martini glass or woman in an evening gown on the cover is suddenly big business for stores that deal in collectible recordings. Albums that once were easily available for 50 cents in dusty thrift shops now change hands for $35 or more.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1999
Dear Mr. Azrael:What recourse do we have for dealing with a mortgage that's charging late fees, but the cause of the fee is actually their delay in processing?We were recently charged a late fee by [our mortgage company], but my payment was not processed for over 20 days after it was mailed. It was mailed from Baltimore to Pittsburgh in late January and was not processed until Feb. 17, 1999.They charged me a late fee of $67.50. To this point we have not been able to get any help through their customer service line, which takes over an hour to get through at times.
NEWS
January 22, 1998
The Chicago Tribune said in an editorial Sunday:LAST WEEK, THESE events made news:Whitewater prosecutor Kenneth Starr visited the White House to gather sworn testimony from first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. It was the fifth time Mrs. Clinton has testified in the investigation.President Clinton gave a deposition in the civil suit brought by Paula Jones, who has accused him of exposing himself and making ''odious, perverse and outrageous'' sexual advances to her in 1991.Labor Secretary Alexis Herman denied she has sold her influence in the White House, an allegation that is being investigated by the Justice Department.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan Leaders of the free world? | March 1, 1998
We're talking to ourselvesA HUNGRY crowd of patrons bunched around the lunch counter at Chick-Fil-A in Marley Station in Glen Burnie last week, placing their orders for chicken sandwiches and nuggets. A lone cashier patiently took each order and bellowed out to the cook, "I need a chicken sandwich, no tomato," with one order; "I need an order of fries" with the next.After a few moments of listening to the cashier's calls to the cook, a slender clerk emerged from the kitchen door."There's no one back here," she said.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2003
Dollars to doughnuts, the wise guy who dismissed baroque music as "Muzak for the intelligentsia" never heard of Red Priest. He probably would have known that "Red Priest" was the nickname for red-headed Antonio Vivaldi, who was indeed ordained but found more fame as a composer in 18th-century Venice than he ever could have as a churchman. But Red Priest is also a quartet of English baroque specialists that has become famous for swashbuckling, highly theatrical performances of works composed by its namesake and others.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | December 22, 1993
Any time something concerning Christmas is banned or challenged, it's almost a cinch news story.But in that regard, this has been a quiet season. I haven't read of even one nativity scene in a public building causing hysteria at the ACLU.The biggest story has been the court battle between the Arkansas businessman who strings a million lights on his mansion, and his irate neighbors.So my ears perked up when a woman caller, from a Chicago suburb, shouted into my ear: "They have outlawed Christmas music at Oak Park High School.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2003
Dollars to doughnuts, the wise guy who dismissed baroque music as "Muzak for the intelligentsia" never heard of Red Priest. He probably would have known that "Red Priest" was the nickname for red-headed Antonio Vivaldi, who was indeed ordained but found more fame as a composer in 18th-century Venice than he ever could have as a churchman. But Red Priest is also a quartet of English baroque specialists that has become famous for swashbuckling, highly theatrical performances of works composed by its namesake and others.
NEWS
By Larry Atkins | December 6, 2002
PHILADELPHIA -- Even though I'm only 41 years old, there are many signs that I'm starting to get old. My knees ache from arthritis and I limp like Walter Brennan after I try to play basketball. My eyesight and hearing are diminishing, as is my hairline. But perhaps one of the clearest signs that I'm getting older is that the music I grew up listening to has evolved into elevator music. During the past year, while eating at various fast-food restaurants, I've heard Muzak versions of Eric Clapton's "Let It Rain," Jethro Tull's "Bungle in the Jungle" and Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven."
BUSINESS
March 21, 1999
Dear Mr. Azrael:What recourse do we have for dealing with a mortgage that's charging late fees, but the cause of the fee is actually their delay in processing?We were recently charged a late fee by [our mortgage company], but my payment was not processed for over 20 days after it was mailed. It was mailed from Baltimore to Pittsburgh in late January and was not processed until Feb. 17, 1999.They charged me a late fee of $67.50. To this point we have not been able to get any help through their customer service line, which takes over an hour to get through at times.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan Leaders of the free world? | March 1, 1998
We're talking to ourselvesA HUNGRY crowd of patrons bunched around the lunch counter at Chick-Fil-A in Marley Station in Glen Burnie last week, placing their orders for chicken sandwiches and nuggets. A lone cashier patiently took each order and bellowed out to the cook, "I need a chicken sandwich, no tomato," with one order; "I need an order of fries" with the next.After a few moments of listening to the cashier's calls to the cook, a slender clerk emerged from the kitchen door."There's no one back here," she said.
NEWS
January 22, 1998
The Chicago Tribune said in an editorial Sunday:LAST WEEK, THESE events made news:Whitewater prosecutor Kenneth Starr visited the White House to gather sworn testimony from first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. It was the fifth time Mrs. Clinton has testified in the investigation.President Clinton gave a deposition in the civil suit brought by Paula Jones, who has accused him of exposing himself and making ''odious, perverse and outrageous'' sexual advances to her in 1991.Labor Secretary Alexis Herman denied she has sold her influence in the White House, an allegation that is being investigated by the Justice Department.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler HTC and Stephen Wigler HTC,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 31, 1997
Among the great English composers, Edward Elgar was "distinguished" by a tin ear when it came to poetry. "The Music Makers," the composer's penultimate chorus-and-orchestra work, is a setting of an amateurish poem by one Arthur O'Shaughnessy, an expert on reptiles who would have been well-advised to have confined himself to those creatures.A composer need not have a good text to produce good music. But it's a measure of the weaknesses of "The Music Makers" that its best passages are those Elgar cannibalized from his earlier works.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Evening Sun Staff | December 15, 1990
It's the season to be shopping and merry music fills the air. But did you know the melodies you hear in stores and shopping malls are also a sales pitch?In stores from groceries to specialty clothing outlets, what was once benign background music is becoming increasingly targeted to specific audiences, like the varied sounds of radio stations. Sometimes the music is even interrupted by "deejays" pitching ads or public service announcements.You still hear "elevator music" (actually called "Environmental Music" by the pioneering Muzak firm)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler HTC and Stephen Wigler HTC,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 31, 1997
Among the great English composers, Edward Elgar was "distinguished" by a tin ear when it came to poetry. "The Music Makers," the composer's penultimate chorus-and-orchestra work, is a setting of an amateurish poem by one Arthur O'Shaughnessy, an expert on reptiles who would have been well-advised to have confined himself to those creatures.A composer need not have a good text to produce good music. But it's a measure of the weaknesses of "The Music Makers" that its best passages are those Elgar cannibalized from his earlier works.
FEATURES
By Fred Shuster and Fred Shuster,Los Angeles Daily News | August 6, 1995
Los Angeles -- Weary of the angst and hand-wringing of alternative rock, a growing number of musical refuseniks have fueled a zany new reissue boom based on easy-listening "elevator music" of the '50s and '60s.The faux-South Pacific instrumentals of Martin Denny, the loopy big-band genius known as Esquivel, and anything with a martini glass or woman in an evening gown on the cover is suddenly big business for stores that deal in collectible recordings. Albums that once were easily available for 50 cents in dusty thrift shops now change hands for $35 or more.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | December 22, 1993
Any time something concerning Christmas is banned or challenged, it's almost a cinch news story.But in that regard, this has been a quiet season. I haven't read of even one nativity scene in a public building causing hysteria at the ACLU.The biggest story has been the court battle between the Arkansas businessman who strings a million lights on his mansion, and his irate neighbors.So my ears perked up when a woman caller, from a Chicago suburb, shouted into my ear: "They have outlawed Christmas music at Oak Park High School.
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