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Elena Kagan

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By Theo Lippman Jr | August 4, 2010
The Senate is expected to confirm this week — possibly as early as today — Elena Kagan to be a Supreme Court justice. I hope that's wrong. I am opposed to her nomination because she graduated from an Ivy League law school. What's wrong with that, you ask? The answer: All nine members would be "Ivies" if she gets on the bench. A second wrong would be that now, all members of the court would have never been elected to a government position. Contrast those circumstances to facts about the Supreme Court's justices of the last half of the 1950s.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 28, 2013
The Supreme Court's mixed bag of decisions in the session's final days, particularly on voting rights and same-sex marriage, seized the nation's headlines but did little to bolster its own clarity or credibility. Interested non-lawyers were left dependent on legal experts to sort out where this highest bench, with a general but not rigidly consistent conservative majority, comes down in today's cultural and political climate. Liberal defenders of the Voting Rights Act's preclearance monitoring of discriminatory practices in states, mostly in the Deep South, were jolted by the court's split decision to abandon the provision.
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NEWS
April 5, 2012
Now your opinion writers are masking their invective. I thought it was a new and fair Dan Rodricks in the first two paragraphs of his recent column ("Razing the JFX, lowering O's expectations," April 3) that reflected the headline. But the remainder of the column was the usual rationalization of President Barack Obama's poor health care law. Healthcare should be improved - coverage for uninsured and an extra year for kids is fine. But we don't need 2,000-plus pages to do that.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
The Supreme Court's decision today to uphold Maryland's law allowing the collection of DNA samples from people arrested for serious crimes upholds the interests of justice, the Constitution and common sense. Concerns that the DNA samples could violate suspects' privacy were unfounded, the practice of taking the samples is less intrusive than other searches authorized under the Fourth Amendment, and the direct result of a ruling against the law would have been the possibility that a known rapist would be released onto the street.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Of all the things in the hundreds of thousands of pages of Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan's paper trail, the one she may regret the most when her Senate confirmation hearing opens today is a 1995 University of Chicago Law Review article about the very process she's about to undergo. She argued that high court confirmation hearings had become useless "lovefests" between question-dodging nominees and compliant senators. The hearings revealed "far too little" about the nominees' views about the law and the constitution, she wrote.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 28, 2013
The Supreme Court's mixed bag of decisions in the session's final days, particularly on voting rights and same-sex marriage, seized the nation's headlines but did little to bolster its own clarity or credibility. Interested non-lawyers were left dependent on legal experts to sort out where this highest bench, with a general but not rigidly consistent conservative majority, comes down in today's cultural and political climate. Liberal defenders of the Voting Rights Act's preclearance monitoring of discriminatory practices in states, mostly in the Deep South, were jolted by the court's split decision to abandon the provision.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
The U.S. Supreme Court takes up the issue of racial preference in college admissions on Wednesday, and that ought to be a concern for those who believe such policies have provided countless opportunities for minorities - and enriched the educational experience for whites. There is a growing movement in this country to eliminate affirmative action on the grounds that it's no longer needed - or was even helpful in the first place. Granted, this can be a complex issue, and even the most liberal interpretations of the race-conscious policy acknowledge that a balance must be struck to make colleges diverse but also keep the admissions process fair and merit-based.
NEWS
By Jonathan Turley | May 16, 2010
If confirmed as a Supreme Court justice, Elena Kagan will bring greater diversity to the court by adding a third woman. What she will not bring is educational diversity. Her confirmation will leave the court entirely composed of former law students at either Harvard or Yale. President Barack Obama's decision to select a nominee from one of these two schools is particularly disappointing as a replacement for Justice John Paul Stevens — an iconic figure on the court who was also its only graduate from an alternative institution (Northwestern)
NEWS
June 3, 2013
The Supreme Court's decision today to uphold Maryland's law allowing the collection of DNA samples from people arrested for serious crimes upholds the interests of justice, the Constitution and common sense. Concerns that the DNA samples could violate suspects' privacy were unfounded, the practice of taking the samples is less intrusive than other searches authorized under the Fourth Amendment, and the direct result of a ruling against the law would have been the possibility that a known rapist would be released onto the street.
NEWS
August 8, 2010
With her confirmation by the Senate as a U.S. Supreme Court justice, Elena Kagan becomes only the fourth woman ever to serve on the nation's highest court. At 50, the former Harvard Law School dean and Obama administration solicitor general can look forward to decades on the bench, where we hope she'll be a moderating force on a court that, like the Senate that confirmed her 63-to-37, has become increasingly polarized in recent decades. Justice Kagan's swearing-in Saturday marks the first time that three female justices will sit on the court concurrently, and she brings impeccable credentials and a wealth of experience to the job, though she has never served as a judge.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
The U.S. Supreme Court takes up the issue of racial preference in college admissions on Wednesday, and that ought to be a concern for those who believe such policies have provided countless opportunities for minorities - and enriched the educational experience for whites. There is a growing movement in this country to eliminate affirmative action on the grounds that it's no longer needed - or was even helpful in the first place. Granted, this can be a complex issue, and even the most liberal interpretations of the race-conscious policy acknowledge that a balance must be struck to make colleges diverse but also keep the admissions process fair and merit-based.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
Now your opinion writers are masking their invective. I thought it was a new and fair Dan Rodricks in the first two paragraphs of his recent column ("Razing the JFX, lowering O's expectations," April 3) that reflected the headline. But the remainder of the column was the usual rationalization of President Barack Obama's poor health care law. Healthcare should be improved - coverage for uninsured and an extra year for kids is fine. But we don't need 2,000-plus pages to do that.
NEWS
August 8, 2010
With her confirmation by the Senate as a U.S. Supreme Court justice, Elena Kagan becomes only the fourth woman ever to serve on the nation's highest court. At 50, the former Harvard Law School dean and Obama administration solicitor general can look forward to decades on the bench, where we hope she'll be a moderating force on a court that, like the Senate that confirmed her 63-to-37, has become increasingly polarized in recent decades. Justice Kagan's swearing-in Saturday marks the first time that three female justices will sit on the court concurrently, and she brings impeccable credentials and a wealth of experience to the job, though she has never served as a judge.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | August 4, 2010
The Senate is expected to confirm this week — possibly as early as today — Elena Kagan to be a Supreme Court justice. I hope that's wrong. I am opposed to her nomination because she graduated from an Ivy League law school. What's wrong with that, you ask? The answer: All nine members would be "Ivies" if she gets on the bench. A second wrong would be that now, all members of the court would have never been elected to a government position. Contrast those circumstances to facts about the Supreme Court's justices of the last half of the 1950s.
NEWS
By John Paul Rollert | July 12, 2010
The Elena Kagan hearings were a sleepy affair. With no 12th-hour revelations and a candidate who acquitted herself as cagey and well qualified, the solicitor general proved adept at the kabuki dance of the Supreme Court confirmation process. Yet there was one exception to the otherwise humdrum hearings: the bewildering decision by Republicans to taint Ms. Kagan by her association with Thurgood Marshall. Yes, that Thurgood Marshall — Baltimore native, hero of the civil rights movement, mastermind of Brown v. Board of Education, and the first African-American Supreme Court justice.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan is but a supporting actor in the drama that will unfold at her nomination hearings, which begin today. With the political composition of the Senate, the solicitor general will be confirmed. The more interesting question is whether the hearings will elevate above the usual spate of buzzwords and gotcha games into meaningful discussion of constitutional interpretation. Indications are stronger than usual that they might. For the first time in decades, the Constitution is a major issue in an election year.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan is but a supporting actor in the drama that will unfold at her nomination hearings, which begin today. With the political composition of the Senate, the solicitor general will be confirmed. The more interesting question is whether the hearings will elevate above the usual spate of buzzwords and gotcha games into meaningful discussion of constitutional interpretation. Indications are stronger than usual that they might. For the first time in decades, the Constitution is a major issue in an election year.
NEWS
By John Paul Rollert | July 12, 2010
The Elena Kagan hearings were a sleepy affair. With no 12th-hour revelations and a candidate who acquitted herself as cagey and well qualified, the solicitor general proved adept at the kabuki dance of the Supreme Court confirmation process. Yet there was one exception to the otherwise humdrum hearings: the bewildering decision by Republicans to taint Ms. Kagan by her association with Thurgood Marshall. Yes, that Thurgood Marshall — Baltimore native, hero of the civil rights movement, mastermind of Brown v. Board of Education, and the first African-American Supreme Court justice.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Of all the things in the hundreds of thousands of pages of Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan's paper trail, the one she may regret the most when her Senate confirmation hearing opens today is a 1995 University of Chicago Law Review article about the very process she's about to undergo. She argued that high court confirmation hearings had become useless "lovefests" between question-dodging nominees and compliant senators. The hearings revealed "far too little" about the nominees' views about the law and the constitution, she wrote.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | May 17, 2010
It is hard not to notice that the ascension of women to the highest ranks of power brings out the most bizarre commentary on their character and qualifications, as if pants suits and piano playing had anything to do with anything. In the case of Elena Kagan, nominated by President Barack Obama to the Supreme Court, we are hearing about her "careerism." Her straight-to-the-top resume is apparently evidence of cold-blooded ambition, while the same quick march to success was considered evidence of Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.'s brilliance.
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