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By Yolanda Garfield | August 4, 1991
This elegant interpretation of a style known as French country dispels the image many people expect -- that of rustic furnishings in rough finishes covered with quaint prints.For the owners of this French country-style home in Potomac, formal entertaining is a top priority. So they asked Rehoboth Beach designer Diane Gordy to update the home's interior to a sophisticated look in keeping with the architecture.To infuse the living room with a light, airy quality, the walls were painted a pale yellow, then the floors were pickled, a process that consists of staining the floors white, rubbing the stain off with a rag, then sealing.
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By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Although it's only minutes from the busiest parts of Howard County, the Highland Inn feels removed from the hustle and bustle of the area. From the pretty setting to the well-executed, classic food, dinner there is a welcome respite from everyday troubles. The Highland Inn's owner, Brian Boston, made his local reputation at the Milton Inn in Baltimore County. Like the Milton Inn, the Highland Inn is nestled in a quiet country setting. Peaceful and charming, the space, in an updated farmhouse, is a little less formal than the Milton Inn, but it is lovely enough to make a meal feel special.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 6, 1994
Despite what many people may think, "elegant" and `f "expensive" need not be synonymous. I've long noticed, in fact, that it doesn't take a bundle of money to make an interior shimmer with elegance. So how, then, should "elegant" be defined?While not nearly as subjective a term as "good taste," this is another of those instances when two people might attach different meanings to the same word. I think, though, that nearly everyone will agree that "elegant" carries connotations of correctness and refinement of style.
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By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Date: April 20 Her story: Casey Schachter, 33, grew up in Leonardtown in St. Mary's County. She works for a government contractor and also teaches yoga at Evolve Yoga + Wellness in California, Md. Her mother, Carol Schachter, and her mother's fiance, Charlie Bass, live in Callaway. Her father, Steve Carey, and his wife, Kim Carey, live in upstate New York. His story: Brian Bowen, 36, grew up in Lusby in Calvert County. He is a firefighter in Washington. His parents, Linda and George Bowen, live in Lusby.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 20, 1996
Everyman Theatre has mounted the most elaborate, elegant production in its short history -- in support of a play about mediocrity.The play is Peter Shaffer's "Amadeus," and the staging is perfectly appropriate since Shaffer tells his story through contrasts.The central contrast concerns Antonio Salieri. At one time the most celebrated composer in Europe, Salieri has the inescapable truth of his own mediocrity forced upon him when confronted by the bona fide genius of that obnoxious prodigy, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 2, 1994
Those of you who follow design trends are probably aware that "elegant eclecticism" has been deemed the defining look of the '90s.That does not mean "anything goes." Instead, the idea is to achieve a sophisticated, pared-down look by assembling a combination of complementary styles.Not surprisingly, references to historical designs are very much a part of this vogue. But it's not a matter of simply filling a room with copies of the wonderful 18th century furniture produced in England, France and in the Colonies.
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1996
Teriko Goodwyn wants her clothes to express who she is. That means she may dress "quietly sassy" one day and "casually elegant" the next.The common thread? The owner of "Expressions of You," a Northwest Baltimore interior design business, is true to her style."Some people let clothes wear them," says Ms. Goodwyn, 38, who has a 3-year-old daughter. "Others wear their clothes, and I'm one of them."Friends say you always look put together. How do you accomplish that?I see my clothing as an expression of me. It's much like when I decorate.
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By Robert Haskins | November 23, 1991
Drastic cuts in state funding forced the Peabody Conservatory to stage Mozart's "Marriage of Figaro" without sets, save for a few simple doorways and furniture.But make no mistake. In every other way, this is a spirited, professional production which well serves the reputation of the nationally known music school.Much of the credit for that success, surely, must rest with Roger Brunyate, who has made Mozart a staple of Peabody's opera program since becoming its artistic director in 1980. This "Figaro" is functional but elegant -- and after seeing the "hip" vagaries of Peter Sellars' Mozart operas, Mr. Brunyate's vision is infinitely more attractive.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 5, 1994
Q: I have inherited some dining-room furniture that is a high-quality reproduction of both Hepplewhite and Sheraton styles. Now I'm puzzled about how to treat the dining room itself. It's a fairly large space with a 9-foot ceiling and two narrow but not-so-tall windows.Any suggestions?A: I assume that you want the room to look elegant and relatively formal.That shouldn't be too difficult to achieve, though you will have to sort through a number of choices relating to your taste, budget and the availability of certain items.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | May 15, 2008
George's, situated in the gorgeous Peabody Court Hotel, has one of Baltimore's best addresses, in Mount Vernon Square and within walking distance of the city's best-known cultural attractions. The historic hotel does justice to the location, practically purring with old-world charm, from its wood floors to its royal-purple walls and the stunning chandelier in the lobby. "Quiet elegance" are the key words of the hotel and its restaurant. The restaurant staff is attentive, but practically tiptoes across the floors, and leans in to take your order, speaking in close to a whisper in an apparent attempt to keep the room's ambient noise level as low as possible.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Terry Stafford grew up in Chatham, Va., before bringing her Southern lifestyle to Abingdon some 28 years ago. Of her dream house, she proudly remarks, "Everybody who comes into this house says it should be in Southern Living magazine. " That was her plan all along when the builder she worked for designed a three-gabled, Colonial-style home for her and husband, Jim Boyd, for which they paid just under $750,000. A licensed real estate agent with Keller Williams Premier Realty and the host for 20 years of the WCBM talk radio show "All About Real Estate," Stafford, 64, insisted that her home fit the couple's lifestyle.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
From its humble origins on the shores of the Patapsco River in industrial and rail-clogged South Baltimore, Charles Street transforms itself during its 10.9-mile journey through the heart of the city as it heads north through the fashionable and wealthy neighborhoods of Guilford, Homeland, Woodbrook, Murray Hill and into Baltimore County. Charles Street — less glamorously known as state Route 139 above North Avenue — courses its way through Mount Vernon Place, around the Washington Monument, the first erected to the nation's first president.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Designed by the influential Baltimore architects Edward L. Palmer and William D. Lamdin in 1925 and built in 1928, the home at 101 Witherspoon Road is one of the premier properties in Homeland. This North Baltimore home is built of local stone with a Vermont slate roof, and it has over 7,000 square feet of living space. The property is being offered by Hill & Co. Realtors for $1.25 million. "It's a unique property with one of the largest lots in Homeland," said Mary Lynne Mullican, the listing agent for Hill & Co. "The wrought-iron work on the back loggia is beautiful.
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Brian Melton | April 15, 2013
One might assume that even the most discriminating big sedan buyer could find satisfaction from one of the nine versions of BMW's flagship 7-series. One would be incorrect. For that ultra-discerning person, there's the BMW Alpina B7: more power, more athletic handling, more exterior styling, more cabin cosseting and, with only 2,000 produced per year, more exclusivity.  Alpina, a limited vehicle production company in its own right, has been partnering with BMW for 40 years to make already exceptional vehicles even better.
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Susan Reimer | February 20, 2013
Women's lacrosse has been warning its people for years: Dial it back, or they will make us wear helmets. Coaches, players and referees knew that if their elegant game got rough, the powers that be would impose helmets. Goggles were required in 2005, and that was just the warning shot. Thanks to the National Football League and the National Hockey League, concussions are no longer the accident that sometimes happens to someone else's kid while playing sports. Brain injuries caused by repeated blows to the head are causing dementia - or worse, suicide - among yesterday's heroes in professional sports.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
When Maureen Neunan's only child headed off to college halfway across the country, the four-bedroom, four-bathroom Ellicott City house where the two lived suddenly seemed enormous to the 56-year-old divorcee. "I decided this was not where I wanted to be," she said. "I didn't need big or grand anymore. " And so she and her friend, real estate agentr Carol Walters of Long & Foster's Columbia office, paid a visit to the Ritz-Carlton Residences at Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Neunan recalled visiting the unit she bought at first sight.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | February 25, 1996
Even though I like a mixture of furniture styles, I'm having trouble producing an informally elegant atmosphere in my large living room. Can you give me some general guidance?I suggest that you keep things simple both in color and line. The floor, walls and curtains could all be done in shades of bleached linen, while at least some of the furniture might be in a similar color. The type of furnishings -- rustic, traditional or modern -- is less important than their color, which should not be dark.
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By Babs Suzanne Harrison and Babs Suzanne Harrison,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | June 2, 1996
London boasts 67 square miles of parks, 50 miles of shops, 227 street markets, five symphony orchestras, 108 theaters, 5,500 pubs and 5,000 restaurants.You, on the other hand, have one weekend.American novelist Henry James said London had an "inconceivable immensity," and it still overwhelms the casual visitor almost 100 years later.How do you cut a city of 7 million down to size? Think neighborhoods, many of which are small cities unto themselves.For the repeat visitor who has seen the major sites, St. James's, in the heart of the West End, provides an elegant microcosm of London's best shops, art galleries, restaurants, royal parks and theaters, all within walking distance.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
James Haddow "Reds" Orpin, a retired salesman and former Overlea resident, died Monday of a heart attack at Baptist Hospital in Pensacola, Fla. He was 70. Mr. Orpin was born in Newark, N.J., and moved with his family at an early age to Meise Drive in Northeast Baltimore. He was a graduate of Parkville High School and served in the Army in Alaska from 1964 to 1966, when he was discharged with the rank of private. A musician who played guitar and bass, Mr. Orpin was a founder in the early 1960s of Danny and the Elegants, which for a time was the house band at Hollywood Park in Essex.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2012
Baltimore has its own beloved Afghan restaurant, The Helmand, which opened in Mount Vernon in 1989 and from the start charmed diners with its refined version of Afghan cuisine in a candlelit urban setting. Howard County has Maiwand Kabob, which is equally beloved. Naseem and Roxanna Rafiq opened the first Maiwand Kabob in 1991 in the Harpers Choice Village Center. Two more locations followed, in Linthicum Heights and Hanover. In June, the Rafiqs, with their daughter, Nina, opened a new location in Columbia Crossing.
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