Advertisement
HomeCollectionsElectronics
IN THE NEWS

Electronics

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 25, 2009
Computer Donation Management Inc., a company that recycles electronic equipment, is moving from its Southeast Baltimore location to an industrial building in East Baltimore near the Baltimore County line. The company, which does business as CDM eCycling, signed a lease for 100,700 square feet at 500 North Point Blvd. and plans to move in January, brokers at Cushman & Wakefield said. The 10-year-old company handles electronic waste materials in the Mid-Atlantic by restoring or dismantling obsolete equipment for parts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 14, 2014
In the second most dangerous city in the country, your letter writers should not be too concerned with kids doing drugs ( "After deaths at Merriweather, Moonrise Festival should be canceled," Aug. 7). Their concern is admirable, but if you were to cancel a show and lock electronic dance music concerts down, it would only create a bigger backlash from fans of this music, which in turn would create a harder and heavier-hitting drug scene. This "dangerous" Moonrise Festival also employed hundreds of people in an area that has a desperate need for jobs.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker | andrea.walker@baltsun.com | March 22, 2010
Electronics retail chain hhgregg plans to open six stores in the Baltimore area later this year, filling a void left when Circuit City went out of business last year. The Indianapolis-based chain will open stores in Hanover, Annapolis, Catonsville, Bel Air, Towson and Glen Burnie – some in former Circuit City buildings. It expects to hire 50 people at each store. The openings are part of an expansion by the company in the mid-Atlantic. hhregg has 129 stores in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.
NEWS
August 12, 2014
Thank you for your insightful editorial on August 5th, advocating for a harm reduction approach to drug use at electronic dance music (EDM) events ( "High risk high," Aug. 5). As the mother of a college student who died of a heat stroke last summer after taking "Molly" as part of her experience at one of these events, I have come to understand more than I ever cared to about this issue. But the death of my daughter has made activism an imperative for me, and I want to see similar tragedies come to an end. Before my daughter, Shelley Goldsmith, died, I had never heard of "harm reduction.
EXPLORE
June 17, 2011
Elkridge-based electronics recycling company E-Structors was honored with a Maryland Green Registry Leadership Award Tuesday, June 7. The award is given to organizations that "have shown a strong commitment to sustainable practices, measurable results and continuous improvement," according to a news release from the Maryland Department of the Environment. E-Structors was able to ensure that 100 percent of the materials it recycles stay out of landfills by increasing the company's operational efficiency and taking advantage of new opportunities to recycle material such as shrink wrap and broken wooden pallets.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Lynetta McCoy has told the teenagers the ugly truth, but not the younger kids. Instead, the smallest of the 50 or so children who regularly eat meals and receive tutoring at the Boys & Girls Club at Admiral Oaks in Annapolis believe that the club's recently stolen Xbox Kinect video game system stopped working. McCoy, the club's director, brought her own Xbox from home for the kids to use on Wednesday. She's still unsure how she'll explain everything else that disappeared during the burglary of more than $15,000 worth of club computers, electronics and cash earlier this week.
NEWS
July 30, 2003
Walter A. Johnston, retired owner of an electronics business and an Eastern Shore hotel, died of cancer Sunday at his home in Largo, Fla. The former Glen Arm resident was 74. Born and raised on a farm in New Windsor, he was a 1946 graduate of Westminster High School. He enlisted in the Navy and was stationed at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, working in electronics. After his discharge, he attended an electronics school and became a military radar test engineer for Bendix Corp. in Towson. He later joined Hoover Electronics in Reisterstown, also in defense work.
NEWS
April 15, 2004
Martin L. Jones, a retired electronics defense worker and former radio station chief engineer, died April 8 of complications from cancer at Rock Glen Nursing Home in Catonsville. The Ellicott City resident was 92. Born in Baltimore and raised in Walbrook, he was a 1930 graduate of Forest Park High School and attended the Johns Hopkins University. Interested in electronics at an early age, he tinkered in his basement and made a working microphone from a Hershey metallic candy wrapper and a magnet.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1992
Franklin Electronic Publishers Inc. will unveil its first product aimed at the handicapped market at the 1992 Winter Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.Language Master 6000SE, a talking electronic dictionary, spell checker, thesaurus, grammar checker and message unit, is the first hand-held unit that has full speech capability, said company spokeswoman Mindy Fendrick.The device, priced at $495, was designed as an aid to people with handicaps such as blindness, speech impairments and learning disabilities.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 24, 1999
SOUTHFIELD, Mich. -- Lear Corp., the world's largest maker of vehicle interiors, is poised to expand in the $20 billion global automotive-electronics market after last month's purchase of UT Automotive for $2.3 billion.The value of electronics per vehicle is expected to average $5,400 next year, up from $1,500 in 1990, James Vandenberghe, Lear's vice chairman, said yesterday.Buying the United Technologies Corp. unit created the world's No. 3 maker of vehicle electrical systems, behind Delphi Automotive Systems Corp.
NEWS
August 11, 2014
Mike Gimbel's short-sighted and reactionary opinion that the Moonrise Festival at Pimlico should be canceled is something I'd expect to hear from a so-called "drug-czar," but it's speech that is uninformed at best and counterproductive at worst ( "After deaths at Merriweather, Moonrise Festival should be canceled," Aug. 8) As someone who regularly attends electronic music events of all shades (raves, club nights, festivals, and so on) throughout the Mid-Atlantic, I've heard speech like Mr. Gimbel's ad nauseam.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Frederick J. "Jack" Beste, a retired businessman and World War II veteran, died Wednesday at Lorien Mays Chapel of complications from pneumonia. He was 88. The son of Frederick J. Beste Sr., a cemetery director, and Evelyn Bevans Beste, a homemaker, Frederick John Beste was born in Baltimore and raised on Rosalie Avenue in Hamilton. He graduated in 1943 from Polytechnic Institute and enlisted in the Army Air Forces, where he was a radar and mathematics instructor. After being discharged in 1947, he went to work as an instructor for the New York Technical Institute of Maryland and later became its director.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Michael Pecht feels like Sherlock Holmes sometimes, and not just because he plays violin on the side. He's a reliability engineer by trade. He runs a 120-person team at the University of Maryland, where the workload includes digging into the mystery of why complex electronics don't work properly. "We get some new problem all the time," he said. "It's just really fascinating. " Pecht, who founded the Center for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering in 1986 and has run it since, was a consultant to Congress during the investigation of reports of sudden acceleration in Toyota vehicles, and more recently for the General Motors ignition-switch recall.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Out with the old, in with the new. Three banks of pay phones at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport have been converted to charging stations for electronic devices, a small upgrade big on symbolism and commentary on our changing times. The switch adds 184 outlets and USB ports in concourse D, an effort aimed at reducing plug-jockeying at the gates of JetBlue, Delta, United, U.S. Airways and Air Canada. The outlets replace previously removed phones that used to dangle inside the silver kiosks mounted on the walls.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 20, 2014
Brigadier General Bruce T. Crawford officially assumed command of the Army Communications-Electronics Command and of Aberdeen Proving Ground on Tuesday during a 10 a.m. ceremony at the post's C4ISR Center of Excellence Campus. Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general of the Army Materiel Command, presided over the ceremony and welcomed Crawford to the AMC family. Both generals greeted the more than 400 soldiers, dignitaries, employees and assembled guests. "Brig. Gen. Crawford knows communications, he knows the warfighter and he is well respected within the Army's Signal community and the Joint C4 [command, control, communications, computers]
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Charles W. Stills Jr., a Baltimore financial consultant who also was a church office manager, died Thursday in his sleep of unknown causes at his East Baltimore home. He was 80. The son of Charles W. Stills Sr., a steelworker and watchmaker, and Clara Henry Stills, a homemaker, Charles William Stills Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on East Eager Street and later Caroline Street. After graduating in 1951 from Dunbar High School, Mr. Williams enrolled at what was then Morgan State College, where he earned a bachelor's degree in business in 1955.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | October 22, 2009
Baltimore County residents can no longer put most household electronics out for trash collection starting Friday, when a new law takes effect. The county council enacted the legislation to keep potentially hazardous materials such as mercury, lead, cadmium, and arsenic out of landfills and waste-to-energy plants. Residents will be responsible for recycling computer equipment, such as monitors, keyboards, printers, laptops, and scanners, as well as televisions, VCRs, DVD players, telephones, including cell phones and answering machines, stereos, fax machines, and video display devices.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2003
Robert Bell Barnhill Sr., a Towson electronics business owner who saw the potential of wireless technology, died Thursday of a stroke at his Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., home. The former Dulaney Valley resident was 86. Born in Marshall, Mo., he began working at a young age to help his family during the Depression. After a year at Missouri Valley College, he went into management training at J.C. Penney, and later worked at Sears Roebuck and Carpenter Paper. He joined the Navy in 1942 and became an aviation radio technician while studying electronic communications at Texas A&M. He was assigned to a Baltimore-made Glenn L. Martin seaplane and flew on anti-submarine patrols in the South Atlantic.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Robert Lenox Dwight, a retired engineer who founded the National Electronics Museum and was active in the Assateague Coastal Trust and the Cylburn Arboretum, died of pneumonia March 22 at Baywoods of Annapolis. He was 91 and had lived on Gibson Island. Born in New York City, he was the son of Maitland Dwight, an attorney, and Lydia Butler Dwight, a homemaker. After graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy, he entered Princeton University in 1941. Following Pearl Harbor, he enlisted in the Navy and entered its V-12 education program.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Cell-phone recycling kiosks will be banned and stores that buy small electronics will be regulated like pawn shops under legislation passed Tuesday by the Baltimore County Council. The pair of bills, introduced last month by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, is meant to stem the theft of cell phones, which police say is a growing problem in the county. Both measures passed unanimously in a 6-0 vote, with one member absent. Robberies in the county have increased in recent years, with more than 350 cell phones stolen last year, police say. County police believe the potential for instant cash available at the recycling machines "was a driving force behind many of these crimes," Chief Jim Johnson said after the meeting.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.