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Electronic Voting

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NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | March 11, 2006
Three days after House lawmakers unanimously passed a bill to abandon Maryland's electronic-voting system in favor of paper ballots, the manufacturer of the touch-screen machines offered a plan it said would provide the confidence of a paper record at a fraction of the costs required by the proposed legislation. Diebold Election Systems said it could replace 5 percent of Maryland's electronic voting machines with models attached to a printer. Swapping out about 1,000 of Maryland's voting machines with the printer-equipped version would cost about $5 million, a fraction of the estimated $12 million to $16 million for a one-year lease of a paper-ballot system required by the House bill, company representatives said.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2012
Two Democratic candidates in Maryland's 1st Congressional District remained locked Thursday in a too-close-to-call contest for the party's nomination, after an initial tally of absentee ballots left them separated by fewer than 100 votes. In the only still-undecided race from Tuesday's statewide primary, Cockeysville businesswoman Wendy Rosen had an 86-vote lead over physician John LaFerla of Chestertown, out of more than 25,000 ballots cast. Rosen has declared victory, but LaFerla has said the race remains too close for him to concede.
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NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2005
After widespread criticism about the security of electronic voting systems, the National Science Foundation announced a $7.5 million grant yesterday for a new center at the Johns Hopkins University to explore the reliability of the machines. Named to head the center was Avi Rubin, a Hopkins professor and longtime critic of the state's electronic voting machines, who said the new center's goal is to design the most foolproof, transparent voting system possible. The center will be called ACCURATE, short for A Center for Correct, Usable, Reliable, Auditable and Transparent Elections.
NEWS
September 16, 2010
The aftermath of Tuesday's primary election has again focused anxiety on Maryland's electronic voting system, with candidates angry about delayed results and, in the case of the Baltimore state's attorney race, one claiming up to 10,000 votes are missing. The questions about the integrity of the process are fueled by what seems like a low-tech component of the system — the transfer of data from the voting machines to county boards of election — that led to several cases of election night human error.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 3, 2004
SANTA ROSA DU PURUS, Brazil - The closest thing to a computer in Manoel Perreira Kaxinawa's tiny village is a calculator, one of two shared by the hamlet's 160 inhabitants. So after a three-day journey upriver to this remote Amazon town, through thick, impenetrable jungle, Perreira was more than ready to glimpse an electronic voting machine. An election official walked him through a demonstration. Perreira, about to vote for the first time in his life, punched in the numbers of his preferred candidates like a natural, a quick and painless practice run for today's election.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2004
An Anne Arundel County Circuit Court judge rejected yesterday a challenge to Maryland's new electronic voting system, saying officials had done enough to "ensure each vote is counted and the security and secrecy of the ballots remain intact." Allowing voters the option of casting paper ballots - one of the plaintiffs' top requests - would "cause much confusion and is clearly against the public interest," Judge Joseph P. Manck said in a seven-page ruling. The state elections chief, Linda H. Lamone, hailed the ruling.
NEWS
September 16, 2010
The aftermath of Tuesday's primary election has again focused anxiety on Maryland's electronic voting system, with candidates angry about delayed results and, in the case of the Baltimore state's attorney race, one claiming up to 10,000 votes are missing. The questions about the integrity of the process are fueled by what seems like a low-tech component of the system — the transfer of data from the voting machines to county boards of election — that led to several cases of election night human error.
NEWS
March 26, 2003
Carroll County could be using an electronic voting system that could cost the county as much as $1.6 million for its next election. Patricia K. Matsko, county elections director, said in a meeting with the commissioners yesterday that Carroll is one of 17 Maryland counties slated for the new Direct Recording Electronic Voting System by this time next year. The state will purchase and maintain ownership of the equipment, while jurisdictions will share equally in the cost. The estimate includes costs to implement the system, technical support, maintenance, training and voter education.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | November 2, 2006
To make sense out of all the confusing and contradictory information out there about electronic voting, it helps to be a bit of a conspiracy theorist. Paranoia, after all, can be merely reading too much into reality. Consider that at least 175,000 Maryland voters have asked for absentee ballots this year - an all-time high. In fact, their number represents about 10 percent of the votes cast in the 2002 gubernatorial election - certainly enough to turn even a relatively close contest into a cliffhanger.
NEWS
October 8, 2006
ISSUE: Elections officials across Maryland faced a bevy of problems on Primary Day. In Anne Arundel, at least 100 vacancies for election judges were unfilled, and many judges who participated lacked the proper training to operate the electronic voting machines. Those two factors contributed to the temporary mishandling of memory cards holding 6,000 votes and sparked allegations of unrecorded votes. County and state elections officials have since expressed confidence in the electronic voting system and said many of the difficulties will be resolved for the general election Nov. 7. YOUR VIEW: Do you have confidence in these voting machines and the ability of Anne Arundel elections officials to correctly operate them Nov. 7?
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2010
One first-grade class at a private school in Owings Mills has spent the year mastering the basics of primary academia and garnering a few lessons in hands-on charity. The 16 students at McDonogh School have made fleece blankets and put together hygiene kits that included wool socks for distribution to Baltimore's homeless. First-grader Mary Corrigan knows the value of an extra pair. "Your socks can get icky when they get wet," she said. The students fashioned colorful friendship pins and sold them for a quarter.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | February 11, 2007
Howard County election officials drew the ire of a powerful local state senator over their opposition to a statewide bill that would require a voter-inspected paper record of ballots in time for next year's March presidential primary. With Senate Majority Leader Edward J. Kasemeyer as the prime sponsor and all but 10 of 47 state senators listed as co-sponsors - including Howard's two other senators - county elections administrator Betty L. Nordaas' caution that switching voting systems would cost the county more than $1 million provoked a reaction.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | November 2, 2006
To make sense out of all the confusing and contradictory information out there about electronic voting, it helps to be a bit of a conspiracy theorist. Paranoia, after all, can be merely reading too much into reality. Consider that at least 175,000 Maryland voters have asked for absentee ballots this year - an all-time high. In fact, their number represents about 10 percent of the votes cast in the 2002 gubernatorial election - certainly enough to turn even a relatively close contest into a cliffhanger.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 29, 2006
The federal government is investigating the takeover last year of a leading American manufacturer of electronic voting systems by a small software company that has been linked to the leftist government of President Hugo Chavez of Venezuela. The federal inquiry is focusing on the Venezuelan owners of the software company, the Smartmatic Corp., and is trying to determine whether the government in Caracas has any control or influence over the firm's operations, government officials and others familiar with the investigation said.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | October 26, 2006
In episode after episode, computer scientists have demonstrated the weaknesses of Maryland's electronic voting system. And time after time, officials from the State Board of Elections and Diebold Election Systems have circled the wagons - ignoring the real issues and branding their critics as kooks. We have now learned that Diebold quietly replaced the main circuit boards in all its terminals last year because of a fatal flaw that it knew about for years. Last week, someone who doesn't like Diebold dropped a couple of disks containing old company source code at the office of a longtime critic of electronic voting.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | October 21, 2006
As the FBI continued its review of the possible theft of the computer code used in Maryland's voting machines two years ago, Diebold and elections officials assured voters that the electronic voting system set to be used in next month's election is safe and tamperproof. But critics of the state elections board and its touch-screen machines said the anonymous package left at a former legislator's office this week was another disturbing sign that Maryland's voting system could face a security threat.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2004
A group advocating a paper audit trail to verify electronic voting in Maryland is calling for the resignation of state elections chief Linda H. Lamone. The Campaign for Verifiable Voting in Maryland plans to present a letter to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. today asking that Lamone be replaced by "an administrator committed to election integrity and a voter-verified paper ballot audit trail," according to the group's co-founder, Linda Schade. At the same time, the group plans to present the governor's office with petitions containing more than 10,000 signatures calling for a voting system that produces paper records, Schade said.
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | October 15, 2006
With less than four weeks to go before the general election, the debate over electronic voting and other problems in Maryland's 2006 electoral process has become as important as the political races themselves - and The Sun should continue to cover all aspects of this continuing story. As Maryland officials try to fix the technical and human problems that created havoc during the September primary election, the integrity of the election system hangs in the balance. Since the primary, a number of articles have documented how the new voter check-in process kept some voters waiting for hours.
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