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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
Actress Felicia "Snoop" Pearson, indicted last month as a co-conspirator in a drug ring, will be released from the city jail on electronic monitoring so she can travel to Philadelphia to film a movie. Pearson, 30, who had troubles with the law before gaining fame for her role on HBO's "The Wire," was among more than 60 people charged in a drug conspiracy case and had been held without bond. Her initial attorney, entertainment lawyer Paul Gardner, launched a "Free Snoop" campaign on YouTube, and later was replaced with attorney Benjamin C. Sutley.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2013
A U.S. District Court judge has released a Baltimore police officer caught in a drug dealing and tax-fraud investigation from federal custody until trial. On Tuesday, U.S. Magistrate Judge Stephanie A. Gallagher allowed Baltimore police officer Ashley Roane, 25, pre-trial release with conditions. She faces charges of attempted possession with intent to distribute one kilogram or more of heroin, possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime, aggravated identity theft and identity theft.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1997
A former Baltimore police officer who was suspected of being an "enforcer" for a drug dealer who had been a friend since childhood was sentenced yesterday to a year on electronic monitoring for falsifying a police report to help his friend.Despite Andre Johnson's assertion that he had been "saved" by religion, Baltimore Circuit Judge Mabel E. H. Hubbard said his crime of misconduct in office deserved punishment. "You knew better," she said. "You promised that you would not consort with known drug dealers."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
A federal court judge ruled Thursday that Baltimore Police Officer Daniel Redd, who was indicted last month on drug conspiracy and firearms charges, can be released from detention pending trial despite having confessed to investigators. He could be released as soon as Friday to his mother's custody under electronic home monitoring and can't leave the house except for doctor's appointments and court-related meetings. The order will be stayed, however, so Assistant U.S. Attorney James Wallner can seek an appeal Friday.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | December 8, 2005
With the support of House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. unveiled his proposal to tighten supervision of convicted sex offenders in Maryland, extending parole to life for serious offenders and allowing them to be monitored electronically. "The time has come for Maryland to move forward on this issue," Curran said during a news conference in Annapolis. The matters of how to effectively inform residents about sex offenders in their communities and how to keep better track of them have become a hot issue this election season, with lawmakers and candidates looking to capitalize on public support for tougher laws.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 31, 2002
A 14-year-old juvenile offender accused of killing another teen-ager -- two days after removing his home-detention electronic monitoring device -- pleaded guilty yesterday to second-degree murder in Baltimore Circuit Court and was given a 12-year prison term. The young killer, Armad Cloude, also pleaded guilty to a charge of using a handgun in a crime of violence. Judge John M. Glynn sentenced the boy to 20 years, then suspended all but 12 years. He recommended that Cloude be sent to the youth offender program at Patuxent Institution.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2002
City and state officials are pledging to do a better job of monitoring young, violent offenders under a new program that Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Mayor Martin O'Malley will announce today. Under Operation Safe Kids, city police and state probation agents will form joint patrols to make sure juvenile offenders are obeying court-ordered curfews and other conditions of their release. An apprehension unit will track down those who violate those conditions. The city's Health Department will hire workers to help offenders find jobs, receive drug treatment and gain access to other social services.
NEWS
May 27, 1993
Seven years into his job as Maryland's public safety secretary, Bishop L. Robinson has reversed course: he's now a fan of alternatives to the state's costly prison expansion plan. He says he would like to see 30 percent of the state's inmates dealt with through non-incarceration.We applaud Mr. Robinson's turnaround. It makes no sense to build a seemingly endless chain of large new prisons. The expense to taxpayers is enormous and the results are counter-productive: prisons don't stop criminals from returning to their former lifestyles once they are released.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1996
Two weeks after developer Philip Manglitz was convicted of laundering money for a western Howard County drug ring, he faces an additional charge of intimidating a federal witness.Federal agents arrested the 48-year-old developer Tuesday night at his Glenwood home and charged him with sending threatening correspondence to a woman he believed was giving information to authorities.Manglitz was formally charged yesterday with witness tampering -- a charge with a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison -- in a hearing in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Sean Mussenden and Sean Mussenden,ORLANDO SENTINEL | May 3, 2005
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - When Mark Lunsford dressed to go to the Capitol yesterday morning, he put on dark pants, a white shirt and a dark necktie patterned with painful memories. It bore a dozen repeating pictures of his 9-year-old daughter, Jessica, smiling broadly. Since her death and the arrest of a convicted sex offender who has been charged with killing her, Jessica's father has worn the tie again and again to lobby lawmakers to tighten the state's pedophile laws. "That's my hug," he said of the tie, which he wore as he watched Gov. Jeb Bush sign a package of laws named for his daughter.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
Actress Felicia "Snoop" Pearson, indicted last month as a co-conspirator in a drug ring, will be released from the city jail on electronic monitoring so she can travel to Philadelphia to film a movie. Pearson, 30, who had troubles with the law before gaining fame for her role on HBO's "The Wire," was among more than 60 people charged in a drug conspiracy case and had been held without bond. Her initial attorney, entertainment lawyer Paul Gardner, launched a "Free Snoop" campaign on YouTube, and later was replaced with attorney Benjamin C. Sutley.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2006
Think twice about what you write in your e-mails, which Web sites you browse and what you say on the telephone. The recent snooping scandal at Hewlett-Packard Co. got me thinking about workplace privacy or the lack thereof. HP's case involved hired investigators who used pretexting, or getting information under false pretenses, to obtain phone records of its board directors, two employees and several journalists. It's an extreme - and possible illegal - case of employer surveillance. But how many of us are really aware of the extent of employer monitoring at our own offices?
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | December 8, 2005
With the support of House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. unveiled his proposal to tighten supervision of convicted sex offenders in Maryland, extending parole to life for serious offenders and allowing them to be monitored electronically. "The time has come for Maryland to move forward on this issue," Curran said during a news conference in Annapolis. The matters of how to effectively inform residents about sex offenders in their communities and how to keep better track of them have become a hot issue this election season, with lawmakers and candidates looking to capitalize on public support for tougher laws.
NEWS
By Sean Mussenden and Sean Mussenden,ORLANDO SENTINEL | May 3, 2005
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - When Mark Lunsford dressed to go to the Capitol yesterday morning, he put on dark pants, a white shirt and a dark necktie patterned with painful memories. It bore a dozen repeating pictures of his 9-year-old daughter, Jessica, smiling broadly. Since her death and the arrest of a convicted sex offender who has been charged with killing her, Jessica's father has worn the tie again and again to lobby lawmakers to tighten the state's pedophile laws. "That's my hug," he said of the tie, which he wore as he watched Gov. Jeb Bush sign a package of laws named for his daughter.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 31, 2002
A 14-year-old juvenile offender accused of killing another teen-ager -- two days after removing his home-detention electronic monitoring device -- pleaded guilty yesterday to second-degree murder in Baltimore Circuit Court and was given a 12-year prison term. The young killer, Armad Cloude, also pleaded guilty to a charge of using a handgun in a crime of violence. Judge John M. Glynn sentenced the boy to 20 years, then suspended all but 12 years. He recommended that Cloude be sent to the youth offender program at Patuxent Institution.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2002
City and state officials are pledging to do a better job of monitoring young, violent offenders under a new program that Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Mayor Martin O'Malley will announce today. Under Operation Safe Kids, city police and state probation agents will form joint patrols to make sure juvenile offenders are obeying court-ordered curfews and other conditions of their release. An apprehension unit will track down those who violate those conditions. The city's Health Department will hire workers to help offenders find jobs, receive drug treatment and gain access to other social services.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1996
Convicted money-launderer Philip Manglitz will remain behind bars until he is sentenced Sept. 8 for his role in a western Howard County drug ring, a federal judge ruled last week.U.S. District Judge Herbert Maletz revoked the Glenwood developer's $1.3 million personal recognizance bond Friday after hearing in federal court. Three weeks ago, Manglitz -- who faces up to life in prison in the money-laundering and drug conspiracy case -- was charged with witness intimidation. He has been jailed since his July 10 arrest on that charge.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | September 14, 1992
As the citizen task force considers alternatives to jail sentences to reduce the detention center population, two county council members say house arrest may be an option.Under house arrest, the inmate must remain at home unless the court authorizes travel, usually for work, school or a medical appointment. An electronic monitoring device assures compliance.Council members Edward Middlebrooks and George F. Bachman said they are especially interested in a sophisticated electronic monitoring system the county considered buying last year.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1997
A former Baltimore police officer who was suspected of being an "enforcer" for a drug dealer who had been a friend since childhood was sentenced yesterday to a year on electronic monitoring for falsifying a police report to help his friend.Despite Andre Johnson's assertion that he had been "saved" by religion, Baltimore Circuit Judge Mabel E. H. Hubbard said his crime of misconduct in office deserved punishment. "You knew better," she said. "You promised that you would not consort with known drug dealers."
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1996
Convicted money-launderer Philip Manglitz will remain behind bars until he is sentenced Sept. 8 for his role in a western Howard County drug ring, a federal judge ruled last week.U.S. District Judge Herbert Maletz revoked the Glenwood developer's $1.3 million personal recognizance bond Friday after hearing in federal court. Three weeks ago, Manglitz -- who faces up to life in prison in the money-laundering and drug conspiracy case -- was charged with witness intimidation. He has been jailed since his July 10 arrest on that charge.
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