Advertisement
HomeCollectionsElectronic Medical Records
IN THE NEWS

Electronic Medical Records

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2010
As Maryland's efforts to implement electronic medical records escalate, so does the debate about patient privacy and the potential for commercial exploitation of the technology. Computerized files are seen as a way to improve care and save tens of billions of dollars in health costs, but doctors and advocacy groups have raised concerns about the risks of exposing detailed personal health information. In particular, doctors worry that insurance and drug companies could manipulate the records to affect decisions on patient treatment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 16, 2014
Who is ready to improve heath care at lower costs? Independent doctors and their patients are. My wife and I organized a group of independent doctors who are in CareFirst Blue Cross Blue Shield's Patient-Centered Medical Home program. Twenty-one years ago, I irritated old docs with my ability to use laptops and then electronic medical records. I took sixth grade typing class, had they? Why did they use dictation? I have been the new kid on the block, so I can connect with any patient.
Advertisement
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 18, 2007
WASHINGTON --The Bush administration has no clear strategy to protect the privacy of patients as it promotes the use of electronic medical records throughout the nation's health care system, federal investigators say in a new report. In the report, the Government Accountability Office, an investigative arm of Congress, said the administration had a jumble of studies and vague policy statements but no overall strategy to ensure that privacy protections would be built into computer networks linking insurers, doctors, hospitals and other health care providers.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 17, 2012
The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is asking the public for informal comments on proposed changes to regulations for summer youth camps. The regulations that look at health and safety issue haven't been updated since 1992. More than 700 youth camps are certified and inspected annually by state health officials and just as many that are run by government agencies or accredited alternatively through Boy Scouts of America or other groups. Officials are looking at these questions: 1.      Should there be a change in the frequency of inspections for camps, based on their health and safety experience, inspection history, and risk?
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Kelly Brewington and Matthew Hay Brown and Kelly Brewington,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | May 19, 2009
Maryland is poised to jump ahead of the rest of the nation in health information technology on Tuesday when Gov. Martin O'Malley signs a bill intended to coax doctors into using electronic medical records. The computerized files are seen as the foundation of a national health information network that proponents say will improve care, advance medical knowledge and save the country tens of billions of dollars annually. But with the startup costs to individual doctors in the tens of thousands of dollars, many smaller practices have been slow to move from clipboard to computer screen.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 17, 2012
The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is asking the public for informal comments on proposed changes to regulations for summer youth camps. The regulations that look at health and safety issue haven't been updated since 1992. More than 700 youth camps are certified and inspected annually by state health officials and just as many that are run by government agencies or accredited alternatively through Boy Scouts of America or other groups. Officials are looking at these questions: 1.      Should there be a change in the frequency of inspections for camps, based on their health and safety experience, inspection history, and risk?
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | May 9, 2006
Maryland ranks fourth among states in the percentage of prescriptions submitted electronically by doctors, a method believed to reduce medical errors, pharmacy industry groups reported yesterday. Two local groups that have been working to encourage doctors to do so-called e-prescribing, the Delmarva Foundation and MedChi, the state medical society, said they would continue their efforts. The ranking came from two pharmacy trade associations, the National Association of Chain Drug Stores and the National Community Pharmacists Association, and from SureScripts, an electronic network for pharmacies set up by the two associations.
NEWS
January 16, 2014
Who is ready to improve heath care at lower costs? Independent doctors and their patients are. My wife and I organized a group of independent doctors who are in CareFirst Blue Cross Blue Shield's Patient-Centered Medical Home program. Twenty-one years ago, I irritated old docs with my ability to use laptops and then electronic medical records. I took sixth grade typing class, had they? Why did they use dictation? I have been the new kid on the block, so I can connect with any patient.
NEWS
By Gene Ransom | February 9, 2012
At a time when physicians and policymakers alike are being asked to reduce health care costs without sacrificing quality care, it's crucial that we unleash the enormous potential for savings that could come from exciting new advances in health information technology. There's no better example of the revolution under way in medical care than electronic medical records and electronic prescribing systems, which not only allow doctors to generate prescriptions and orders electronically and transmit them directly, but provide instant access to drug reference information and a patient's complete medical history.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | January 3, 2008
Designing new health insurance packages to cover the uninsured. Finding ways to reward doctors and hospitals for good and efficient care. Controlling medical costs. Building a secure system of electronic medical records. Chester "Chet" Burrell, the new chief executive officer of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, is setting an ambitious agenda for himself and his company. Burrell, who started on the job Dec. 1, has been busy in his first month, meeting with the political leaders, hospital executives and others who have had a sometimes contentious relationship with the state's largest health insurer over the past few years.
NEWS
By Gene Ransom | February 9, 2012
At a time when physicians and policymakers alike are being asked to reduce health care costs without sacrificing quality care, it's crucial that we unleash the enormous potential for savings that could come from exciting new advances in health information technology. There's no better example of the revolution under way in medical care than electronic medical records and electronic prescribing systems, which not only allow doctors to generate prescriptions and orders electronically and transmit them directly, but provide instant access to drug reference information and a patient's complete medical history.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2010
As Maryland's efforts to implement electronic medical records escalate, so does the debate about patient privacy and the potential for commercial exploitation of the technology. Computerized files are seen as a way to improve care and save tens of billions of dollars in health costs, but doctors and advocacy groups have raised concerns about the risks of exposing detailed personal health information. In particular, doctors worry that insurance and drug companies could manipulate the records to affect decisions on patient treatment.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Kelly Brewington and Matthew Hay Brown and Kelly Brewington,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | May 19, 2009
Maryland is poised to jump ahead of the rest of the nation in health information technology on Tuesday when Gov. Martin O'Malley signs a bill intended to coax doctors into using electronic medical records. The computerized files are seen as the foundation of a national health information network that proponents say will improve care, advance medical knowledge and save the country tens of billions of dollars annually. But with the startup costs to individual doctors in the tens of thousands of dollars, many smaller practices have been slow to move from clipboard to computer screen.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | January 3, 2008
Designing new health insurance packages to cover the uninsured. Finding ways to reward doctors and hospitals for good and efficient care. Controlling medical costs. Building a secure system of electronic medical records. Chester "Chet" Burrell, the new chief executive officer of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, is setting an ambitious agenda for himself and his company. Burrell, who started on the job Dec. 1, has been busy in his first month, meeting with the political leaders, hospital executives and others who have had a sometimes contentious relationship with the state's largest health insurer over the past few years.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 18, 2007
WASHINGTON --The Bush administration has no clear strategy to protect the privacy of patients as it promotes the use of electronic medical records throughout the nation's health care system, federal investigators say in a new report. In the report, the Government Accountability Office, an investigative arm of Congress, said the administration had a jumble of studies and vague policy statements but no overall strategy to ensure that privacy protections would be built into computer networks linking insurers, doctors, hospitals and other health care providers.
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | May 9, 2006
Maryland ranks fourth among states in the percentage of prescriptions submitted electronically by doctors, a method believed to reduce medical errors, pharmacy industry groups reported yesterday. Two local groups that have been working to encourage doctors to do so-called e-prescribing, the Delmarva Foundation and MedChi, the state medical society, said they would continue their efforts. The ranking came from two pharmacy trade associations, the National Association of Chain Drug Stores and the National Community Pharmacists Association, and from SureScripts, an electronic network for pharmacies set up by the two associations.
NEWS
December 3, 2010
I was saddened to read "Patient perks: Hospitals sweeten the pot with made-to-order meals, private rooms and Wi-Fi. " (Dec. 2.) In the article you noted that local hospitals are spending millions of dollars on "house musicians and round-the clock room-service meals ... 32-inch flat-screen televisions, safes, Wi-Fi ... comfort foods like milkshakes ... entertainment centers," etc. More than 10 years ago, the Institute of Medicine issued a...
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | August 6, 2009
A statewide health information exchange that would give doctors computerized access to patients' medical histories got a $10 million funding boost Wednesday. The Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission, the state agency that sets rates that hospitals can charge, approved the startup funding to build the system that's been studied for several years. The funding comes from a surcharge of a few pennies on hospital bills, which are mostly footed by insurance companies. "This will give health care providers the right information at the point of care so that they can make the best diagnosis and treatment decision, while in a framework that protects patient privacy," said David Horrocks, president of Chesapeake Regional Information System for our Patients.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.