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By SUSAN REIMER | January 15, 2006
During his holiday break from school, I pestered my son with so many questions about how to operate my new iPod, that he slapped a sign on my back: "Caution. Student iPod User." And it was a charming coincidence Christmas morning when we each opened a gift certificate for music downloads from the other. It was almost like an O. Henry short story. But these gifts were just what the people at Common Sense Media wanted: They presented a parent and a child with an opportunity to interact on the subject of electronic media.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 6, 2013
It is a recommendation that is certain to cause huge family fights, followed by door-slamming, tears and covert attempts to subvert it. The American Academy of Pediatrics is recommending that parents limit their children's access to cell phones, the Internet and television, especially in their bedrooms and particularly after lights out. And it has recommended that its member doctors begin asking questions about electronic media use at well-child...
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 6, 2013
It is a recommendation that is certain to cause huge family fights, followed by door-slamming, tears and covert attempts to subvert it. The American Academy of Pediatrics is recommending that parents limit their children's access to cell phones, the Internet and television, especially in their bedrooms and particularly after lights out. And it has recommended that its member doctors begin asking questions about electronic media use at well-child...
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | May 1, 2007
Circulation at the nation's major metropolitan newspapers continued to drop in the six months ending March 31 as consumers increasingly turned to the Internet and other electronic media for news, according to industry figures released yesterday. Average daily circulation at 745 newspapers dropped 2.1 percent compared with the corresponding period last year, according to a report released by the Audit Bureau of Circulations and analyzed by the Newspaper Association of America. Average Sunday circulation at 601 newspapers slipped 3.1 percent.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | May 1, 2007
Circulation at the nation's major metropolitan newspapers continued to drop in the six months ending March 31 as consumers increasingly turned to the Internet and other electronic media for news, according to industry figures released yesterday. Average daily circulation at 745 newspapers dropped 2.1 percent compared with the corresponding period last year, according to a report released by the Audit Bureau of Circulations and analyzed by the Newspaper Association of America. Average Sunday circulation at 601 newspapers slipped 3.1 percent.
NEWS
July 2, 2000
County department wins in national competition The Carroll County Department of Economic Development recently was named a winner in the international marketing competition sponsored by the American Economic Development Council. The office earned an Excellent Award for its publication/ad/paid campaign/B&W entry. Entries were submitted in 29 categories for four budget levels. Items included electronic media and printed materials. Judging was based on graphic appeal, appropriateness of message, positioning of content, and for electronic media, data type, quality and navigability.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | March 28, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The big talk in Washington is the raunchy performance given by a radio talk show host named Don Imus to the Radio & Television Correspondents Dinner.Mr. Imus insulted the President and First Lady, sitting just a few feet away from him, as well as the network anchormen, in what the 3,000 attendees considered to be bad taste.While most media dinners are in questionable taste, this one embarrassed the TV people because it appeared more than once on C-SPAN. The White House had asked C-SPAN not to replay it, but C-SPAN refused the request, thus guaranteeing it the largest audience it ever had.Those of us in the print media were not surprised that the radio-TV correspondents would screw up as badly as they did by inviting the bawdy Mr. Imus in the first place.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | March 17, 1991
The Lenten service at a Pasadena church Wednesday wasn't exactly a night for sackcloth and ashes.Instead of somber reflection, about 40 people who came to the Pasadena United Methodist Church to hear a lecture about the media and values had one rollicking good time.Church members nodded and clapped as the Rev. Bernard Keels, a former TV reporter and pastor of the A. P. Shaw United Methodist Churchin Washington, D.C., lambasted television as the evil of the age.Keels, who holds degrees from Haverford College and Yale Divinity School, blamed the electronic media for our violent society, saying "all our young boys see are guns."
SPORTS
By The Hartford Courant | October 9, 1992
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- The torrent New York Giants coach Ray Handley had to expect was unleashed yesterday.Abuse flowed nonstop on WFAN-AM. It detonated on the back pages of the New York tabloids, one showing a photo of Handley nudging a photographer from practice, another running a large picture of Handley with a gas gauge reading empty drawn on his forehead.This was the day after Handley announced his new media schedule, which significantly curtails his availability. Lost in all of it were two other stories that broke Wednesday -- the retirement plans of linebacker Lawrence Taylor, probably the best player the team has ever had, and the elbow injury that could keep starting quarterback Phil Simms out for up to six weeks.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | March 28, 1994
EVERY time there is a big story in Washington, the political participants blame the MEDIA. Words such as "press frenzy" and "yellow journalism" pop up all over the place. Those involved seem to believe that their problems would just disappear if only reporters would shut up.The question then arises:What branch of the MEDIA are we talking about?Who specifically is to blame for attacks on the integrity of all these public officials who chose to serve their country at great financial sacrifice?
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | January 15, 2006
During his holiday break from school, I pestered my son with so many questions about how to operate my new iPod, that he slapped a sign on my back: "Caution. Student iPod User." And it was a charming coincidence Christmas morning when we each opened a gift certificate for music downloads from the other. It was almost like an O. Henry short story. But these gifts were just what the people at Common Sense Media wanted: They presented a parent and a child with an opportunity to interact on the subject of electronic media.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
Hoping to force action on his centerpiece witness-intimidation bill, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. called on a favorite weapon in dealing with a reluctant legislature: TV. Just in time for Wednesday's 5 p.m. news, the Republican governor strode into his ceremonial reception room alongside Patricia C. Jessamy, Baltimore's Democratic state's attorney, and hammered home the notion that opponents of the bill are bucking an issue that crosses partisan, racial...
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2003
Understand this: Television news loves bad weather. It lives for bad weather. So local stations felt they had a lot to live for yesterday as Hurricane Isabel swept toward Maryland. "It's the perfect television story," said Scott Livingston, news director of WBFF-TV. "You hope no one gets harmed, but you don't know what's going to happen." Stations expanded coverage - adding hours here, brief cut-ins there, with a whole lot of weather maps. News conferences from Mayor Martin O'Malley and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. were given extensive live coverage.
NEWS
July 2, 2000
County department wins in national competition The Carroll County Department of Economic Development recently was named a winner in the international marketing competition sponsored by the American Economic Development Council. The office earned an Excellent Award for its publication/ad/paid campaign/B&W entry. Entries were submitted in 29 categories for four budget levels. Items included electronic media and printed materials. Judging was based on graphic appeal, appropriateness of message, positioning of content, and for electronic media, data type, quality and navigability.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | March 28, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The big talk in Washington is the raunchy performance given by a radio talk show host named Don Imus to the Radio & Television Correspondents Dinner.Mr. Imus insulted the President and First Lady, sitting just a few feet away from him, as well as the network anchormen, in what the 3,000 attendees considered to be bad taste.While most media dinners are in questionable taste, this one embarrassed the TV people because it appeared more than once on C-SPAN. The White House had asked C-SPAN not to replay it, but C-SPAN refused the request, thus guaranteeing it the largest audience it ever had.Those of us in the print media were not surprised that the radio-TV correspondents would screw up as badly as they did by inviting the bawdy Mr. Imus in the first place.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | March 28, 1994
EVERY time there is a big story in Washington, the political participants blame the MEDIA. Words such as "press frenzy" and "yellow journalism" pop up all over the place. Those involved seem to believe that their problems would just disappear if only reporters would shut up.The question then arises:What branch of the MEDIA are we talking about?Who specifically is to blame for attacks on the integrity of all these public officials who chose to serve their country at great financial sacrifice?
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
Hoping to force action on his centerpiece witness-intimidation bill, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. called on a favorite weapon in dealing with a reluctant legislature: TV. Just in time for Wednesday's 5 p.m. news, the Republican governor strode into his ceremonial reception room alongside Patricia C. Jessamy, Baltimore's Democratic state's attorney, and hammered home the notion that opponents of the bill are bucking an issue that crosses partisan, racial...
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2003
Understand this: Television news loves bad weather. It lives for bad weather. So local stations felt they had a lot to live for yesterday as Hurricane Isabel swept toward Maryland. "It's the perfect television story," said Scott Livingston, news director of WBFF-TV. "You hope no one gets harmed, but you don't know what's going to happen." Stations expanded coverage - adding hours here, brief cut-ins there, with a whole lot of weather maps. News conferences from Mayor Martin O'Malley and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. were given extensive live coverage.
SPORTS
By The Hartford Courant | October 9, 1992
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- The torrent New York Giants coach Ray Handley had to expect was unleashed yesterday.Abuse flowed nonstop on WFAN-AM. It detonated on the back pages of the New York tabloids, one showing a photo of Handley nudging a photographer from practice, another running a large picture of Handley with a gas gauge reading empty drawn on his forehead.This was the day after Handley announced his new media schedule, which significantly curtails his availability. Lost in all of it were two other stories that broke Wednesday -- the retirement plans of linebacker Lawrence Taylor, probably the best player the team has ever had, and the elbow injury that could keep starting quarterback Phil Simms out for up to six weeks.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | March 17, 1991
The Lenten service at a Pasadena church Wednesday wasn't exactly a night for sackcloth and ashes.Instead of somber reflection, about 40 people who came to the Pasadena United Methodist Church to hear a lecture about the media and values had one rollicking good time.Church members nodded and clapped as the Rev. Bernard Keels, a former TV reporter and pastor of the A. P. Shaw United Methodist Churchin Washington, D.C., lambasted television as the evil of the age.Keels, who holds degrees from Haverford College and Yale Divinity School, blamed the electronic media for our violent society, saying "all our young boys see are guns."
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