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By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 29, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- America Online Inc., the No. 1 online service, filed another lawsuit yesterday to stop its customers from being flooded with millions of unsolicited pieces of "junk" e-mail.The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in San Diego against Michael Persaud, claims that he committed fraud by using various names to send millions of e-mail messages to America Online customers. Those messages solicit money in exchange for a directory of companies that offer home employment.The lawsuit is one of nine filed by AOL in five states against people who send out "spam," a term for unwanted electronic mail.
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BUSINESS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2005
An Essex man was placed on probation this week for harassing his former supervisor by signing her up for e-mail subscriptions, flooding her inbox with unwanted messages from dating services and job lines, the state attorney general's office said yesterday. Scott C. Huffines, 41, a former Web designer at Maryland Public Television, admitted signing his supervisor's e-mail address on Internet sites to annoy the woman with the resulting e-mails, according to the attorney general's office.
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NEWS
By Leslie Cauley | August 22, 1991
While the eyes of the world stayed glued to television sets and newspapers to keep up with unfolding events in the Soviet Union over the past 48 hours, employees at a local computer firm only had to turn to their computer screens for updates.Using electronic mail, or "E-mail" -- the computer equivalent of sending letters back and forth -- representatives of Intelligent Resources International Inc. said that they were able to maintain nearly constant communication with Soviet citizens for updates on events as they happened half a world away.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
A Harford County man has been charged in connection with a series of threatening e-mails to school officials and local and state politicians. Police issued an arrest warrant yesterday for Douglas Andrew Kukucka, 42, who worked in the facilities department of the Harford County school system until he was fired in 2002. Kukucka allegedly sent e-mails to officials accusing the school system of conspiring to conceal environmental hazards, police say. An e-mail to a Baltimore TV station last week alluded to a pending school "massacre" in Harford County.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1995
You can't reach the mayor of Baltimore by e-mail. You can't reach the mayor of Washington by computer, either. But if you want to talk to the mayor of Westminster, just have your modem call his.Mayor Kenneth A. Yowan made his electronic mail address public this week, opening a communications link to anyone, anywhere, who has access to a computer, a modem and a mail account.Mr. Yowan can be reached at kyowanccpl.carr.lib.md.us.Carroll County Public Library patrons who have accounts can use library computers to send electronic mail to the mayor, said Scott Reinhart, assistant director for automation support and technical services.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | October 26, 1992
ATLANTA -- Last year Kennesaw, Ga., native Tommy Williams, a sometime country singer, sat down at his computer and wrote to his new love. Though they'd never met, they'd exchanged scores of cathode-ray letters, hers signed "Judith of the Valley," his signed "The Seeker.""If you are as serious as I about our love and life, may I have your typing hand please? And a paper clip?" he tapped on his keyboard.A world away, near Sacramento, Calif., Judy Lewis lifted her hand, and followed her suitor's instructions: "Now modify the paper clip . . . and pretend I am putting it on your finger."
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | November 9, 1992
Business group fears rates in C&P's planHouston's, an Atlanta-based chain of 60 restaurants nationwide, has tried out the pager idea in Phoenix, Chicago and California with similar results.MCI is reaching out for Clinton coattailsNever one to miss a marketing trick, MCI Communications Corp. has launched a new ad campaign to take advantage of Clinton fever. A 24-page booklet, which will appear as newspaper inserts, outlines MCI's plans for telecommunications changes in businesses. It's dubbed the "100 Day Report."
NEWS
March 29, 1996
ELECTRONIC MAIL, better known as e-mail, is sending the General Assembly a message: Maryland's Open Meetings law should be updated to reflect the capabilities of this rapidly expanding means of private communication.Specifically, public bodies required to hold open meetings to discuss policy matters should not be permitted to use thiscomputer-message medium to avoid that legal obligation.Secret meetings and telephone round-robins are barred in these cases. E-mail should be added to the list, as more and more people learn to communicate via computer, whether over the Internet or through on-line services.
BUSINESS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2005
An Essex man was placed on probation this week for harassing his former supervisor by signing her up for e-mail subscriptions, flooding her inbox with unwanted messages from dating services and job lines, the state attorney general's office said yesterday. Scott C. Huffines, 41, a former Web designer at Maryland Public Television, admitted signing his supervisor's e-mail address on Internet sites to annoy the woman with the resulting e-mails, according to the attorney general's office.
BUSINESS
By Steve Auerweck and Steve Auerweck,Staff Writer | June 7, 1993
MCI wins contract for network servicesWashington-based MCI Corp. has won a five-year contract worth more than $200 million to provide network services to CoREN, a new, coast-to-coast consortium of eight regional data networks that make up the heart of the Internet.The agreement, announced last week, means that the regional networks will be able to migrate easily to advanced offerings such as switched digital services or asynchronous transfer mode (ATM), according to Jerry Edgerton, MCI's vice president of government systems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Harry Jackson Jr. and Harry Jackson Jr.,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 4, 2003
ST. LOUIS - Electronic mail has become the third-most popular form of communication behind meeting face-to-face and speaking on the telephone. Billions of e-mail "letters" from individuals, corporations, governments and other facilities and countries cross paths every day. So what has changed? Until the mid-1990s, when the broad embrace of e-mail became a household tool, letters were the way to communicate in writing. Many protocols regulated letters from the formal, typewritten, businesslike to very casual, handwritten and colloquial.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Tom Pelton and Michael Stroh and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2001
Need to give Ben Cardin a piece of your mind? These days you're more likely to reach Baltimore's Democratic congressman with a PC than a pen. Like many legislators, Cardin hasn't seen the mailman in his Washington office for nearly three weeks. "E-mail has become the principal way - and for many people the only way - to communicate," says Cardin, who is wired into his office e-mail through his new BlackBerry pager. "If we can't get the views of our constituents, we can't function." From Capitol Hill to Hollywood, use of electronic mail and faxes is surging as mailroom closures and fears over poisoned letters continue to spread.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2000
Snide jokes about the boss. Cartoons containing ethnic slurs. Sexually explicit messages. Across the state, Maryland's municipalities are scrambling to let workers know their every keystroke could be monitored as the computer police nose around inboxes and peek at electronic files in search of offensive e-mail messages. "It's a public trust issue," said Steven D. Powell, director of management and budget for Carroll County. "When you're using equipment that belongs to the taxpayers, you have to be mindful that everything you do is subject to public scrutiny."
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2000
When Bill Clinton and his staffers vacate the White House in January, they'll leave behind a historic mess: eight years' worth of memos, snapshots and bureaucratic bric-a-brac that must be preserved for posterity by the National Archives, the government's official record keeper. And, oh yes, there's also the little matter of 40 million e-mail messages. While the Clinton administration isn't the first to have electronic mail, it's the first to amass so much of it. Recorded on thousands of magnetic computer tapes, the messages will constitute the largest single deposit of digital records in the history of the National Archives.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 21, 2000
MOSCOW -- In the old Soviet days, the secret police had all the time and money they needed to read mail, tap telephones and keep track of typewriters and their owners. The Internet, bearing its huge flow of information, caught them at a moment of weakness, when government budgets were turning into a trickle too small to support expensive new eavesdropping technology. Resourceful as ever, the successors to the old KGB rose to the challenge. They decided that Internet users themselves should pay for the cost of being bugged.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alicia C. Shepard and Alicia C. Shepard,Special to the Sun | April 19, 1999
COLLEGE PARK -- Revolutions by nature are noisy. But not this one.Quietly and without fanfare, academic life at the University of Maryland's flagship campus has changed dramatically over the past four or five years as students and faculty push the "send" button on their computers.One day last month, 36,000 messages were delivered by just one of a dozen or so university e-mail systems. Electronic mail has become as much a part of college here and at universities across the country as chalkboards and calculators.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
A Harford County man has been charged in connection with a series of threatening e-mails to school officials and local and state politicians. Police issued an arrest warrant yesterday for Douglas Andrew Kukucka, 42, who worked in the facilities department of the Harford County school system until he was fired in 2002. Kukucka allegedly sent e-mails to officials accusing the school system of conspiring to conceal environmental hazards, police say. An e-mail to a Baltimore TV station last week alluded to a pending school "massacre" in Harford County.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | August 12, 1997
Tired of relying on the usual shorthand and those abominable "emoticons" for expressing yourself in your e-mail? Well, cool out, cats and dolls -- Frank-E-Mail is swingin' to your rescue.Frank-E-Mail, an Internet program that turns ordinary e-mail into Sinatra-ese, is the brainchild of Rich Paschall, a 33-year-old advertising man in Atlanta. He created translations of several hundred common words and phrases that might have been uttered by the Chairman.Pascall's Web site -- http: //www.pscentral.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 29, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- America Online Inc., the No. 1 online service, filed another lawsuit yesterday to stop its customers from being flooded with millions of unsolicited pieces of "junk" e-mail.The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in San Diego against Michael Persaud, claims that he committed fraud by using various names to send millions of e-mail messages to America Online customers. Those messages solicit money in exchange for a directory of companies that offer home employment.The lawsuit is one of nine filed by AOL in five states against people who send out "spam," a term for unwanted electronic mail.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1998
Jayne A. Hitchcock was becoming a familiar name on the Internet. Too familiar.By January 1997, you might have found the Crofton woman's name, address and home phone number in news groups for sadomasochists. You could see it on electronic bulletin boards for beer lovers, calling them drunks and morons. Her employer found it on electronic mail messages insulting her co-workers.Hitchcock -- who says she did not send the messages but suspects who did -- called police to report this high-tech harassment.
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