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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
Just beyond the entrance of the Maryland Live Casino, row and row of video slot machines clang and beep and flash, beckoning would-be gamblers to insert bills - or even a credit card. Sprawling across a space larger than three typical Wal-Marts, the casino at Arundel Mills Mall, scheduled to open June 6, also features gaming consoles hooked into video feeds of real-time dice rolls, roulette wheel spins and card deck deals. "We are really concentrated on turning it into a really dynamic environment," said Joe Weinberg, managing partner and president of gaming forthe Cordish Cos., the Baltimore-based development firm that built and operates the casino.
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NEWS
By Louise Vest | January 13, 2014
January 1965 Vroom vroom Used car ads in the Times: " '62 Studebaker, V-8, automatic, 4 Door Sedan: $895; 1961 Dodge, Very clean, 8-cylinder, auto trans, many extras: $895; 1961 Chrysler, 2-door hardtop with automatic transmission, power steering: $1295; '59 Oldsmobile 4-door hardtop, auto transmission, 8 cylinder, Good condition: $695. " "Transco Names Ferguson: Tyler A. Ferguson has been named superintendent of pipeline construction for the Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Corporation, E. Clyde McGraw, president has announced.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | May 29, 2003
The best games are easy to learn but difficult to master, and so it was with Simon. When this strange but addictive tabletop toy hit the store shelves in 1978 it became an instant best seller. At a time when electronic games were in their infancy and a novelty, millions were mezmerized by Simon's four glowing panels, which beeped cheerfully as they lit up in random patterns of increasing length that players were challenged to match until their short-term memory gave out. Twenty-five years later, Milton Bradley has launched a glitzed-up anniversary model for the MTV generation called Simon2, which keeps the faith but adds some 21st century wrinkles.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
Some of those who came to play at Hot Spot Sweepstakes in Towson on Wednesday afternoon walked away disappointed. Some seemed stunned. Finding the door locked, they peeked into the tinted storefront window to see a dark room and tables and chairs, but none of the computer terminals where some spent hours a week playing a slots game for cash prizes. The game room with 100 computer terminals had been shut down and cleared of all machines earlier in the day by Baltimore County police officers, who hit the location on Goucher Boulevard in Towson and nine other places in the county in a sweep culminating an investigation that began late last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Scott and Dave Scott,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 26, 2000
There was a time when the "Endless Summer" for a child referred to hours spent at the beach, on a dusty baseball diamond or romping with the neighborhood kids. Kids still do all of those things, but today's kids have more ways of having fun, including hours and hours in front of computers or game consoles playing interactive games - contests that can feature a lot of blood and gore. More than 200 million electronic games are sold each year and millions of kids play them as part of their normal, nonviolent lives.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 4, 2001
JOYCE HLASS says that her son, Charlie, had a positive influence on many people during his 21 years of life. One year after Charlie's death from leukemia, Hlass is working to continue her son's legacy of brightening other people's lives through a foundation she started in his memory, Through Charlie's Eyes. The foundation was set up during the spring to raise money for enhancing the quality of life for patients ages 18-30 undergoing bone marrow and stem cell transplants. During Charlie's 16-month battle with acute myeloid leukemia, he underwent four stem cell transplants from his younger sister, Jennifer, now a junior at Towson University.
TRAVEL
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Last month, David Tewell gathered a group of friends and headed north to Atlantic City's new Golden Nugget casino and resort for two nights of eating well, club-hopping and, of course, gambling. For the 27-year-old Annapolis resident, hitting the poker tables makes the three-hour trip up I-95 worth it. "A successful Atlantic City trip is going out at night and playing poker during the day," Tewell said. "Nothing around Baltimore rivals it. " That may change tonight, with the grand opening of the roughly $500 million Maryland Live Casino at Arundel Mills Mall.
NEWS
By Louise Vest | January 13, 2014
January 1965 Vroom vroom Used car ads in the Times: " '62 Studebaker, V-8, automatic, 4 Door Sedan: $895; 1961 Dodge, Very clean, 8-cylinder, auto trans, many extras: $895; 1961 Chrysler, 2-door hardtop with automatic transmission, power steering: $1295; '59 Oldsmobile 4-door hardtop, auto transmission, 8 cylinder, Good condition: $695. " "Transco Names Ferguson: Tyler A. Ferguson has been named superintendent of pipeline construction for the Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Corporation, E. Clyde McGraw, president has announced.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
Some of those who came to play at Hot Spot Sweepstakes in Towson on Wednesday afternoon walked away disappointed. Some seemed stunned. Finding the door locked, they peeked into the tinted storefront window to see a dark room and tables and chairs, but none of the computer terminals where some spent hours a week playing a slots game for cash prizes. The game room with 100 computer terminals had been shut down and cleared of all machines earlier in the day by Baltimore County police officers, who hit the location on Goucher Boulevard in Towson and nine other places in the county in a sweep culminating an investigation that began late last year.
FEATURES
By P.J. Huffstutter and P.J. Huffstutter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 2, 1999
SAN RAFAEL, Calif. -- Jack Sorensen's phone rings. It's another call for help.A movie studio executive is trying to persuade Sorensen's software developers at LucasArts Entertainment Co. to create a computer game based on his upcoming film. Another pitch. Another "sure hit." And like scores of calls before, the LucasArts president will reject it."Studios are begging everyone I know to do projects. And we won't because we don't have to," Sorensen said. "I remember these same executives, just a few years ago, laughing at the idea of games being as big as movies.
TRAVEL
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Last month, David Tewell gathered a group of friends and headed north to Atlantic City's new Golden Nugget casino and resort for two nights of eating well, club-hopping and, of course, gambling. For the 27-year-old Annapolis resident, hitting the poker tables makes the three-hour trip up I-95 worth it. "A successful Atlantic City trip is going out at night and playing poker during the day," Tewell said. "Nothing around Baltimore rivals it. " That may change tonight, with the grand opening of the roughly $500 million Maryland Live Casino at Arundel Mills Mall.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
Just beyond the entrance of the Maryland Live Casino, row and row of video slot machines clang and beep and flash, beckoning would-be gamblers to insert bills - or even a credit card. Sprawling across a space larger than three typical Wal-Marts, the casino at Arundel Mills Mall, scheduled to open June 6, also features gaming consoles hooked into video feeds of real-time dice rolls, roulette wheel spins and card deck deals. "We are really concentrated on turning it into a really dynamic environment," said Joe Weinberg, managing partner and president of gaming forthe Cordish Cos., the Baltimore-based development firm that built and operates the casino.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar and Julie Baughman, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2011
Baltimore County police are likely to file charges in their investigation of the use of electronic gambling devices at a Dundalk bar co-owned by state Del. Joseph J. "Sonny" Minnick, a police spokeswoman said. Detective Cathy Batton, the spokeswoman, said she could not discuss the nature of the charges or say who would be charged until the investigation into Minnick's Restaurant is complete. Baltimore County police raided the restaurant June 29 and seized five electronic gambling devices.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
Baltimore County police raided Minnick's Restaurant in Dundalk, owned by Del. Joseph J. "Sonny" Minnick, and seized five electronic gaming devices, according to a police spokeswoman. Police removed the machines from the bar at 7100 Sollers Point Road on June 29, acting on a complaint received by the liquor board, police spokeswoman Detective Cathy Batton confirmed. She said no charges have been filed. Michael Mohler, chief administrator for the Board of Liquor License Commissioners, said the agency received an anonymous complaint that the bar "has been paying off on poker machines and has been for years.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | February 27, 2008
They look like slots, they play like slots, they pay out like slots, and they have proliferated for years under a legal loophole. But with Maryland girding for a debate over expanding state-sanctioned gambling, top lawmakers said yesterday that they intend to back legislation that would outlaw loosely regulated electronic gambling machines. Placed in dedicated parlors or bars and restaurants from Western Maryland to the Eastern Shore, many of the machines have spinning cherries or BAR icons but are technically considered bingo games, not slot machines.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | March 22, 2007
When our boys were young, I would yield to temptation from time to time and buy them hand-held electronic games - tiny versions of blackjack, frogger, poker, pinball or some other pleasant time-waster. They were fun, easy to use and didn't require a major investment. So I had a feeling of pleasant d?j? vu when I unwrapped Radica's Brain Games, a little gadget with a monochrome LCD screen that looked a lot like the beeping boxes the kids enjoyed. But this was different in one key respect.
FEATURES
By Amy Harmon and Amy Harmon,Los Angeles Times | May 30, 1995
Through the one-way glass, you can see the young Asian agent writhing in pain. Still, she refuses to talk. You are not a violent person. But you know what you have to do.You are, after all, a CIA recruit who has discovered a plot to assassinate the U.S. president. And this is, after all, only a game -- one that incorporates the best that digital technology has to offer. You turn up the voltage. She screams.So goes the interactive revolution."The Great Game" is one of a new crop of video games that give players control over ever more realistic -- and violent -- fantasy worlds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2000
PlayStation again, Sam. The North American launch of Sony's PlayStation 2 on Thursday is the most anticipated release of a video game system since "Pong" took over American TV sets in the mid-'70s. Thousands of video game addicts who ordered their systems 10 months ago will kick off the frenzy at one minute after midnight on launch day, when more than 200 Babbage's stores open their doors for the occasion. "We're worried that we're going to have a big problem with our customer base missing school or work the next day," said Russ Howard, vice president of brand marketing for the 962-store chain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | May 29, 2003
The best games are easy to learn but difficult to master, and so it was with Simon. When this strange but addictive tabletop toy hit the store shelves in 1978 it became an instant best seller. At a time when electronic games were in their infancy and a novelty, millions were mezmerized by Simon's four glowing panels, which beeped cheerfully as they lit up in random patterns of increasing length that players were challenged to match until their short-term memory gave out. Twenty-five years later, Milton Bradley has launched a glitzed-up anniversary model for the MTV generation called Simon2, which keeps the faith but adds some 21st century wrinkles.
NEWS
By Betsy Diehl and Betsy Diehl,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 4, 2001
JOYCE HLASS says that her son, Charlie, had a positive influence on many people during his 21 years of life. One year after Charlie's death from leukemia, Hlass is working to continue her son's legacy of brightening other people's lives through a foundation she started in his memory, Through Charlie's Eyes. The foundation was set up during the spring to raise money for enhancing the quality of life for patients ages 18-30 undergoing bone marrow and stem cell transplants. During Charlie's 16-month battle with acute myeloid leukemia, he underwent four stem cell transplants from his younger sister, Jennifer, now a junior at Towson University.
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