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Electronic Filing

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BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | January 3, 1996
Marylanders will file more than a million fewer forms when they do their state taxes this year, but they may get a bigger kick from filling out a new, extra one on their federal return -- one that lets them get their federal refund deposited directly into their bank account."
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
Comptroller Peter Franchot said Wednesday that he planned to make the process of filing income taxes in Maryland "virtually paperless" by 2014. Franchot said at a meeting of the Board of Public Works, on which he sits, that 70 percent of Maryland taxpayers were expected to files returns electronically this year – double the rate of five years ago. He said electronic filing saved the state $2 per return and reduced paper waste by 26 million pages...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh | February 14, 2000
While traditional tax preparation programs are still improving, a lot of this year's tax action is taking place -- you guessed it -- online. The Internal Revenue Service is once again pushing taxpayers to file electronically rather than through the mail. According to the IRS, taxpayers who file electronically have fewer errors and get faster refunds. Last year, about one-quarter of all taxpayers filed electronically, either through the Internet or by "telefile," the agency's telephone service.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | January 24, 2009
TIP 12 IRS expands free electronic filing to all taxpayers Here's a tax break for all taxpayers: File your federal tax return for free with the IRS. The tax agency this year expanded its electronic filing program in ways that make it free for anyone who wants to use it. First, the income limit to qualify for the IRS Free File program has been raised. Taxpayers with adjusted gross income of up to $56,000 - more than 98 million of them - can file electronically through Free File now. The program is a partnership with private tax preparers and the IRS. You access it through the IRS site at www.irs.
NEWS
By Robert D. Hershey Jr. and Robert D. Hershey Jr.,New York Times News Service | February 21, 1994
An article in Sunday's Sun about electronic tax fraud incorrectly reported the states in which taxpayers can file federal and state tax returns in a single transmission to the IRS. In Maryland, filing a return requires a separate transmission.The Baltimore Sun regrets the errors.WASHINGTON -- Seeking to automate its way out of a morass of paper by encouraging the electronic filing of tax returns, the Internal Revenue Service now faces a costly threat from thieves using the technology to get fraudulent refunds.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1996
For anyone who has ever tried to sift through the campaign finance reports filed by political candidates in Maryland, there is really only one major obstacle: a voluminous mound of paper.Yesterday, lawmakers were asked to take the first baby steps toward improving access to those records by allowing candidates to file reports electronically with the state election board in Annapolis."The reports you see today are a product that is incapable of being analyzed," said Del. Dana Dembrow, a Montgomery County Democrat.
NEWS
By Jim Newton and Jim Newton,Los Angeles Times | April 13, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Jerome Hearne used to rob people for a living, but sometime in the late 1980s or early 1990s he turned to a more lucrative livelihood: robbing the U.S. Treasury.Hearne's adopted brand of crime was electronic tax fraud. He and a band of Los Angeles cohorts joined a fast-growing legion of crooks who are filing false returns and getting quick, illegal refunds in the form of bank loans.The scams bring together clever ringleaders and large numbers of low-rent co-conspirators, usually unemployed or homeless people who are willing to have their real names and Social Security numbers used on fake tax returns.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1999
Maryland State Comptroller William Donald Schaefer heralded electronic tax return filing yesterday as "the right thing to do."At a news conference in southern Baltimore, Schaefer alerted Maryland residents that this is the first tax season in which taxpayers can file their state returns electronically from their home computer."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
Comptroller Peter Franchot said Wednesday that he planned to make the process of filing income taxes in Maryland "virtually paperless" by 2014. Franchot said at a meeting of the Board of Public Works, on which he sits, that 70 percent of Maryland taxpayers were expected to files returns electronically this year – double the rate of five years ago. He said electronic filing saved the state $2 per return and reduced paper waste by 26 million pages...
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2003
With 2.1 million taxpayers taking advantage of free electronic filing so far, the Internal Revenue Service's program is on target to surpass projections. "We've been projecting 2.5 million; we should pass that easily," Terry Lutes, IRS director of electronic tax administration, said yesterday. This is the first year that the IRS has offered free electronic filing through a partnership with 17 tax preparation companies. Under a three-year agreement, the companies provide the service for free in exchange for the IRS not getting into the business itself.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | December 27, 2006
In a pilot project that could become a statewide model, Anne Arundel County is about to begin a shift to electronic filing of Circuit Court cases. In two years, complaints to start divorce proceedings or allegations that a convicted criminal is violating conditions of probation will be filed with the touch of a few computer keys, eliminating most paper from court cases. About 23,000 new cases are opened in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court each year. Though some generate few documents, a long-simmering family feud or civil dispute or a retrial of an overturned criminal conviction can generate files that take up several shelves.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | September 26, 2004
BOB CASSEL knows electronic tax-filing is the future. It's accurate. It's fast. It saves paper. It saves money. He's just not ready to climb on board. "Am I ultimately in favor of electronic filing?" says Cassel, a financial planner and tax pro for Baltimore-Washington Financial Advisors who handles about 300 returns a year. "The answer is yes. I just haven't gotten off my butt." William Donald Schaefer wishes he would. Noting that Maryland trails other states in electronic filing, the state comptroller is urging professional preparers such as Cassel to substantially boost electronic returns for their clients - or else.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2004
The federal government yesterday unveiled improvements to its free online tax filing program that it hopes will encourage more taxpayers to file electronic rather than paper returns. This is the second year for Free File, a partnership between the Internal Revenue Service and 16 private tax preparers. Under their pact, the IRS stays out of the tax software business and the companies offer free electronic filing to at least 60 percent of taxpayers, or about 78 million people. "It's an easy, fast and secure way for citizens to file their taxes," Treasury Secretary John W. Snow said at a news conference yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2003
With 2.1 million taxpayers taking advantage of free electronic filing so far, the Internal Revenue Service's program is on target to surpass projections. "We've been projecting 2.5 million; we should pass that easily," Terry Lutes, IRS director of electronic tax administration, said yesterday. This is the first year that the IRS has offered free electronic filing through a partnership with 17 tax preparation companies. Under a three-year agreement, the companies provide the service for free in exchange for the IRS not getting into the business itself.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2003
In its first week, the Internal Revenue Service's free electronic filing service has experienced heavy online traffic, making it the agency's most popular Web page. Free File, a partnership between the IRS and 17 tax preparer companies, offers free tax preparation and electronic filing to those who meet certain criteria. About 18 percent of the 3.5 million visits to the IRS Web site in the past week were to the Free File section, according to an IRS official. Under a three-year agreement, the companies are providing the free service in exchange for the IRS not offering a competing service, said Terry Lutes, director of electronic tax administration for the IRS. The companies also hope that some customers may someday become paying clients, he said.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2003
The state's top judges agreed yesterday that a small group of them will try to unravel the complexities in a proposal to provide equal public access to paper and electronic court records, and will make suggestions to the full court. Robert M. Bell, chief judge of the Court of Appeals, named himself and Judges Lynne A. Battaglia and Alan M. Wilner to sort through the proposal to decide how to proceed. The decision was made at the end of an afternoon discussion about the recommendations from an 18-member court-appointed panel.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2004
The federal government yesterday unveiled improvements to its free online tax filing program that it hopes will encourage more taxpayers to file electronic rather than paper returns. This is the second year for Free File, a partnership between the Internal Revenue Service and 16 private tax preparers. Under their pact, the IRS stays out of the tax software business and the companies offer free electronic filing to at least 60 percent of taxpayers, or about 78 million people. "It's an easy, fast and secure way for citizens to file their taxes," Treasury Secretary John W. Snow said at a news conference yesterday.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2003
The state's top judges agreed yesterday that a small group of them will try to unravel the complexities in a proposal to provide equal public access to paper and electronic court records, and will make suggestions to the full court. Robert M. Bell, chief judge of the Court of Appeals, named himself and Judges Lynne A. Battaglia and Alan M. Wilner to sort through the proposal to decide how to proceed. The decision was made at the end of an afternoon discussion about the recommendations from an 18-member court-appointed panel.
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