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By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 25, 2002
PLANO, Texas - Electronic Data Systems Corp. won a five-year, $1.3 billion contract from ABN Amro Holding NV yesterday to manage computer networks for the biggest Dutch bank's corporate- and investment-banking division. The agreement concludes more than four months of talks and comes 12 days after Electronic Data, the world's second-biggest computer-services company, announced a 10-year, $4.5 billion order from Bank of America Corp. The new contracts eased concern among some investors that Electronic Data might be unable to compete for big orders, which can require multimillion-dollar, up-front investments.
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NEWS
March 30, 2014
The implications of your editorial on proposed reforms to the National Security Agency are scurrilous and highly offensive ( "Who will watch the watchers?" March 25). Since its inception in 1952, the NSA has possessed a highly moral, patriotic workforce dedicated to following the rules. They are overly conscientious about citizens' privacy rights and overly conscientious concerning any warrant they would send to the FISA court. Since CIA leaker Edward Snowden's acts of treason, it has become de rigueur to assume the NSA is spying on innocent citizens, listening in on their phone calls, trampling civil liberties and otherwise running amok.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Eric Siegel and Gail Gibson and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2000
Concerned about privacy issues and growing requests for computerized information, the state judiciary has proposed sharply limiting public access to electronic court records. The changes would restrict access to computerized criminal records to lawyers, police and government agencies. Anyone else seeking the electronic information would have to explain what they planned to do with it and prove that they are engaged in a legitimate government or business activity. People who go to courthouses to review criminal or civil files could also have their requests limited to no more than 10 records per day under the proposed public records guidelines, which were made public last week and will be the subject of a public hearing Dec. 13. The guidelines are aimed primarily at requests for electronic data.
NEWS
March 25, 2014
Having conducted a months-long review of the issue, President Obama reportedly will soon announce a proposal to end the National Security Agency's bulk collection of data about Americans' phone calls and require the agency to get a court order before seeking such information in the future. But putting limits on the agency's capacity to spy on Americans may not be as easy as it sounds, especially if the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance (FISA) Court which is supposed to rule on the legality of NSA programs, continues to rubber-stamp its approval of every request the agency apparently makes.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
Brian L. Moffet said he saw the writing on the wall about three years ago. The Baltimore attorney was arguing a national class action suit with 50,000 pieces of paper entered into evidence when the judge asked, "Where are the e-mails?" That sent Moffet into scramble mode. "It was the first time I realized it was something that was going to have to be addressed," he said. More than 90 percent of all new information is created and stored in electronic form, according to the University of California Berkeley.
NEWS
March 30, 2014
The implications of your editorial on proposed reforms to the National Security Agency are scurrilous and highly offensive ( "Who will watch the watchers?" March 25). Since its inception in 1952, the NSA has possessed a highly moral, patriotic workforce dedicated to following the rules. They are overly conscientious about citizens' privacy rights and overly conscientious concerning any warrant they would send to the FISA court. Since CIA leaker Edward Snowden's acts of treason, it has become de rigueur to assume the NSA is spying on innocent citizens, listening in on their phone calls, trampling civil liberties and otherwise running amok.
NEWS
March 25, 2014
Having conducted a months-long review of the issue, President Obama reportedly will soon announce a proposal to end the National Security Agency's bulk collection of data about Americans' phone calls and require the agency to get a court order before seeking such information in the future. But putting limits on the agency's capacity to spy on Americans may not be as easy as it sounds, especially if the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance (FISA) Court which is supposed to rule on the legality of NSA programs, continues to rubber-stamp its approval of every request the agency apparently makes.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - Finding ways to preserve and use old records - fading photographs, books with pages turning to dust, or even not-so-ancient reel-to-reel and eight-track recordings - is an understandable challenge. But now archivists and librarians find themselves dealing with something far more surprising - the digital formats currently being used to preserve much of America's fragile history are themselves proving to be dangerously vulnerable. "Much of the information of the 21st century and the late 20th century will be lost if we don't do something," said L. Reynolds Cahoon, an assistant archivist at the National Archives and Records Administration.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
A second high-level official at the state health department's laboratory was placed on leave this week, following revelations that the lab destroyed a large number of records documenting lead poisoning in Maryland children. The lab's deputy director, Michael J. Wajda, has been removed from his position pending an investigation by the department's inspector general. The lab's former director, John DeBoy, was also placed on paid leave earlier this month. DeBoy, meanwhile, said through his attorney Friday that he destroyed lab records only after receiving approval from the office of the state attorney general, an assertion that a spokeswoman for the office did not directly address.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabela | December 10, 2012
The new CEO and president of Belcamp-based SafeNet Inc. said Monday he intends to raise the profile of the data protection firm and “take SafeNet to the next level” by pursuing more commercial clients who are moving toward “cloud” computing. The company on Monday announced the appointment of Dave Hansen, the 48-year-old former CEO of Nomura Software and, since March, vice president and general manager of BMC Software, which had acquired Nomura. Hansen succeeds Chris Fedde, CEO since 2011, who will become a consultant to SafeNet, the company said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabela | December 10, 2012
The new CEO and president of Belcamp-based SafeNet Inc. said Monday he intends to raise the profile of the data protection firm and “take SafeNet to the next level” by pursuing more commercial clients who are moving toward “cloud” computing. The company on Monday announced the appointment of Dave Hansen, the 48-year-old former CEO of Nomura Software and, since March, vice president and general manager of BMC Software, which had acquired Nomura. Hansen succeeds Chris Fedde, CEO since 2011, who will become a consultant to SafeNet, the company said.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2011
Top officials at the state health department's lab wrongly orchestrated the widespread destruction of blood test records for lead-poisoned children, even as they knew the documents were being sought by the children's attorneys through court subpoenas or public information requests, according to a report released Friday by the agency's chief investigator. The report, by Inspector General Thomas V. Russell, portrays the state lab as a place where supervisors felt overwhelmed and badly understaffed, and where the steady requests for blood results submitted by plaintiffs' lawyers fed a growing resentment that eventually prompted the shredding and erasing of records.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2011
A second high-level official at the state health department's laboratory was placed on leave this week, following revelations that the lab destroyed a large number of records documenting lead poisoning in Maryland children. The lab's deputy director, Michael J. Wajda, has been removed from his position pending an investigation by the department's inspector general. The lab's former director, John DeBoy, was also placed on paid leave earlier this month. DeBoy, meanwhile, said through his attorney Friday that he destroyed lab records only after receiving approval from the office of the state attorney general, an assertion that a spokeswoman for the office did not directly address.
NEWS
By Warren Vieth and Warren Vieth,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 28, 2005
CLEVELAND - President Bush prodded doctors and hospitals yesterday to make better use of computers to share patient information, saying the health care industry's continued reliance on paper records inflates costs and undermines care. Participating in a talk show-style "conversation" with Cleveland-area medical personnel, Bush said the development of a nationwide data-sharing network was an integral part of his agenda for reducing health care costs. "Most industries in America have used information technology to make their businesses more cost-effective ... and the truth of the matter is, health care hasn't," Bush said.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
Brian L. Moffet said he saw the writing on the wall about three years ago. The Baltimore attorney was arguing a national class action suit with 50,000 pieces of paper entered into evidence when the judge asked, "Where are the e-mails?" That sent Moffet into scramble mode. "It was the first time I realized it was something that was going to have to be addressed," he said. More than 90 percent of all new information is created and stored in electronic form, according to the University of California Berkeley.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - Finding ways to preserve and use old records - fading photographs, books with pages turning to dust, or even not-so-ancient reel-to-reel and eight-track recordings - is an understandable challenge. But now archivists and librarians find themselves dealing with something far more surprising - the digital formats currently being used to preserve much of America's fragile history are themselves proving to be dangerously vulnerable. "Much of the information of the 21st century and the late 20th century will be lost if we don't do something," said L. Reynolds Cahoon, an assistant archivist at the National Archives and Records Administration.
BUSINESS
By Phillip Robinson and Phillip Robinson,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 23, 1992
I need your help on this one. A month ago, I started taking a close look at data base manager programs, which make sense of the piles of electronic data that companies and individuals keep.Paradox 4.0 was out, Borland also had a new version of dBASE, Microsoft had purchased FoxPro, Microsoft's own Access data base manager was almost to market, friends suggested Panorama was the easiest Macintosh data base, I had calls and visits from other people, such as those using DataEase and Approach.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2011
Top officials at the state health department's lab wrongly orchestrated the widespread destruction of blood test records for lead-poisoned children, even as they knew the documents were being sought by the children's attorneys through court subpoenas or public information requests, according to a report released Friday by the agency's chief investigator. The report, by Inspector General Thomas V. Russell, portrays the state lab as a place where supervisors felt overwhelmed and badly understaffed, and where the steady requests for blood results submitted by plaintiffs' lawyers fed a growing resentment that eventually prompted the shredding and erasing of records.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2003
The state's top judges agreed yesterday that a small group of them will try to unravel the complexities in a proposal to provide equal public access to paper and electronic court records, and will make suggestions to the full court. Chief Judge of the Court of Appeals Robert M. Bell named himself and Judges Lynne A. Battaglia and Alan M. Wilner to sort through the proposal to decide how to proceed. The decision was made at the end of an afternoon discussion about the recommendations from an 18-member, court-appointed panel.
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