Advertisement
HomeCollectionsElectronic Commerce
IN THE NEWS

Electronic Commerce

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1998
A Chicago-based investment firm pledged $100 million yesterday to AppNet Systems Inc., a young Bethesda company that has visions of becoming dominant in the exploding electronic commerce industry."
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2000
Joseph Galli Jr. is on a mission: to make VerticalNet Inc., the company he now heads, as much a household name as Amazon.com Inc., the company he left. If he can do that, the former executive of Towson-based Black & Decker Corp. might realize another goal, helping put the East Coast on the map for technology. Galli tried to spread the word about VerticalNet and e-commerce lessons learned at Amazon while speaking yesterday to about 200 Baltimore brokers, consultants, bankers, accountants and Internet business people at Maryvale Preparatory School.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
A half-dozen major U.S. companies announced yesterday that they will work with a Washington attorney for Baltimore-based Piper & Marbury LLP to increase consumer confidence worldwide in shopping on the Internet.The companies, America Online Inc., Dell Computers Inc., International Business Machines Corp., Microsoft Corp., Time Warner Inc. and Visa U.S.A. Inc., want to establish a "predictable and stable" legal environment worldwide to ease international transactions on the World Wide Web, said Ron Plesser, the Piper attorney who will coordinate the group's efforts.
NEWS
May 2, 2000
New technology laws will hurt consumers, won't attract business The Sun seems to have uncritically bought the governor's claim that Maryland has taken a leadership role in digital commerce by passing a number of computer related laws. It asserted in the subheading of a recent article that new laws will "promote technology" and in the article that Maryland will be a "national leader in electronic commerce" ("Glendening signs bills on e-commerce," April 26). Maryland has become a leader, all right.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1999
AppNet Inc. reported yesterday that its third-quarter revenue was up 67.6 percent over last year and announced that it planned to sell 4 million additional shares of common stock.The Bethesda electronic commerce company had revenue of $30.1 million in the quarter, which ended Sept. 30. In the third quarter of last year, the company took in $18 million.AppNet had a quarterly net loss of $21.3 million, or 68 cents per diluted share. Last year, the company's third-quarter loss was $20.7 million, or $1.09 per share.
BUSINESS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 6, 1997
Perhaps to the surprise of one gender and not the other, female entrepreneurs are more actively adopting new technology for business growth than their male counterparts, according to a newly released study.Among the study's most significant findings is that "the share of women business owners that have established a home page for their business has tripled since last year -- 23 percent now have a home page, compared to 16 percent for men," according to Lois Haber, chairwoman of the National Foundation for Women Business Owners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,Sun Staff | January 31, 2000
Suppose you bought a computer program that crashed and trashed your system -- and the only place you could sue for damages was in Ireland. Suppose a software giant sued you because you posted unkind comments on the Internet about a program that didn't work. Or suppose the family photos you posted on the Web turned up in a big company's advertising campaign -- and you learned the company had the right to your image simply because you used one of its programs to edit the photos. You already may have agreed to terms like these when you broke the plastic seal on a software package or clicked an "I accept" button on a program you downloaded from the Internet.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1999
AppNet Systems Inc., a Bethesda company that is less than 2 years old but hopes to emerge a dominant player in the exploding electronic commerce industry, went public yesterday, raising $72 million.The company sold 6 million shares, or a 20 percent stake, at $12 each. The shares closed unchanged on the Nasdaq stock market, reflecting the recent cooling trend for Internet-related issues.The company, which helps companies set up and maintain computer systems that allow them to conduct business over the Internet, said in its filing for the initial public offering that it posted a $15 million loss on revenue of $17 million in 1998.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2000
Maryland could be the first state in the nation to set up courts for settling legal disputes over high-technology business issues under legislation pending before the General Assembly. House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr., the bill's chief sponsor, says a specialized court is needed because of the growing role that electronic commerce is playing in Maryland's economy and because the issues involved are increasingly technical and complex. "We've got to come up with the judicial expertise to judiciously manage this new world of e-commerce we're coming into," the Allegany County Democrat said.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | September 1, 1998
Acquisition-hungry AppNet Systems Inc., a Bethesda-based electronic commerce service provider, said yesterday that it had bought Software Services Corp. of Ann Arbor, Mich.Software Services Corp., a profitable operation that employs 210 and had revenue of $20 million last year, will operate as a wholly owned subsidiary of AppNet, which employs about a dozen at its Bethesda headquarters and recently landed $100 million in venture funding.Financial details were not disclosed. Both companies are privately held.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2000
Gov. Parris N. Glendening signed a wide-ranging package of technology-promoting bills into law yesterday, then jetted off to Silicon Valley to boast that they will make Maryland a national leader in electronic commerce. The governor's visit to Cisco Systems in San Jose, Calif., today is the first stop on a weeklong trip that will take him to three states to promote initiatives the state launched or expanded during the General Assembly session that ended this month. For Glendening, already basking in national attention over passage of his gun safety legislation, the trip will further raise his profile as he prepares to take over the chairmanship of the National Governors' Association in July.
NEWS
By Jerry J. Jasinowski | February 16, 2000
WASHINGTON -- In a smart move -- taken none too soon -- the Commerce Department recently announced that it would begin following the impact of electronic commerce on the broader economy. We will start surveying tens of thousands of manufacturers over the next few months, asking how much they acquire and sell over the Internet, said Commerce Secretary Bill Daley. A recent study by GartnerGroup estimates that business-to-business (B2B) e-commerce will skyrocket from about $145 billion in 1999 to $7.3 trillion in 2004, accounting for seven percent of all sales transactions around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,Sun Staff | January 31, 2000
Suppose you bought a computer program that crashed and trashed your system -- and the only place you could sue for damages was in Ireland. Suppose a software giant sued you because you posted unkind comments on the Internet about a program that didn't work. Or suppose the family photos you posted on the Web turned up in a big company's advertising campaign -- and you learned the company had the right to your image simply because you used one of its programs to edit the photos. You already may have agreed to terms like these when you broke the plastic seal on a software package or clicked an "I accept" button on a program you downloaded from the Internet.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2000
Maryland could be the first state in the nation to set up courts for settling legal disputes over high-technology business issues under legislation pending before the General Assembly. House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr., the bill's chief sponsor, says a specialized court is needed because of the growing role that electronic commerce is playing in Maryland's economy and because the issues involved are increasingly technical and complex. "We've got to come up with the judicial expertise to judiciously manage this new world of e-commerce we're coming into," the Allegany County Democrat said.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2000
In a bid to make Maryland a mecca for electronic commerce, Gov. Parris N. Glendening and legislative leaders have agreed to push an ambitious package of bills aimed at creating the friendliest legal environment in the nation for doing business over the Internet. The "Technology Agenda" to be unveiled today at an Annapolis news conference would promote high-technology businesses in the state while updating existing laws to deal with legal problems spawned by the cyber-revolution -- issues such as computer piracy, invasion of privacy and distribution of child pornography over the Internet.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1999
By everyday standards, the leasing of eight digital copiers is hardly worth noting.But years from now, the execution of the small deal yesterday between Advance Business Systems Inc. and Hodes, Ulman, Pessin & Katz in Towson may well stand as a milestone in the development of electronic commerce.That's because the Cock- eysville office equipment company and the Towson law firm struck their deal without paper and with help from eOriginal Inc., a 3-year-old Baltimore company with a patented process that allows users to create, sign, transfer and retrieve documents electronically.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | September 29, 1995
COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Checkfree Corp. shares rose as much as 27 percent yesterday as investors chased shares of the electronic commerce company, a maker of software for doing business on the Internet.Shares of the Columbus-based company, priced at $18, closed up $3.50, at $21.50, on trading of 5.6 million shares, making it the fourth-most-active issue on the Nasdaq market and seventh overall."Everyday you hear something new about the 'Net," said Iang Jeon, a money and technology analyst at Forrester Research in Cambridge, Mass.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1999
AppNet Systems Inc., a Bethesda electronic commerce service provider, said yesterday that it had bought Kodiak Group of Pittsfield, Mass.Kodiak Group employs 50; AppNet employs 550.Terms were not disclosed. Both companies are privately held."The acquisition of the Kodiak Group represents a key component of AppNet's long-term strategy for delivering comprehensive e-commerce services under one roof," said Ken S. Bajaj, chief executive and co-founder of AppNet, in a written statement.Kodiak's services include providing secure routing for electronic commerce transactions.
NEWS
December 8, 1999
TECHNOLOGY is big business for Maryland. Jobs in this industry now number 225,000, mostly in the Baltimore-Washington region. The state's tech companies exceed 6,500, with an $11 billion payroll.The B-W corridor stands No. 2 in the United States in information technology firms and No. 3 in biotechnology. A new survey ranks Baltimore and Rockville Nos. 1 and 2, respectively, for high-tech job growth in the mid-Atlantic.No wonder more than 12,000 people are expected to visit the state's Technology Showcase at the Baltimore Convention Center today and tomorrow.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1999
AppNet Inc. reported yesterday that its third-quarter revenue was up 67.6 percent over last year and announced that it planned to sell 4 million additional shares of common stock.The Bethesda electronic commerce company had revenue of $30.1 million in the quarter, which ended Sept. 30. In the third quarter of last year, the company took in $18 million.AppNet had a quarterly net loss of $21.3 million, or 68 cents per diluted share. Last year, the company's third-quarter loss was $20.7 million, or $1.09 per share.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.