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By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
Video games are a lot of things - a $7 billion-a-year industry, a source of entertainment for millions of Americans, a pop culture phenomenon that has spawned books and films and, some argue, a medium that glorifies violence. But the one thing they are not is tear-jerkers. At least until now. Tomorrow, game industry leader Electronic Arts releases The Sims 2, a souped-up sequel to the best-selling computer game of all time and an attempt to reach an emotional level rarely achieved by video games.
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BUSINESS
By Alison Matas, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
A federal judge last week threw out a Baltimore security guard's copyright infringement case against National Football League Properties, saying there was no evidence the NFL had licensed the use of the Ravens logo he'd designed to a software company. Frederick E. Bouchat has been credited with designing the Ravens' first logo, known as the "Flying B logo," and is awaiting compensation. In this most recent case, Bouchat claimed he wasn't getting credit for the use of the logo in some Madden NFL video games.
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FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 20, 1993
There ought to be a sign at the entrance of the Winter Consumer Electronics show in Las Vegas: "Suspend your disbelief at the door."While 90 percent of the high-tech products unveiled in mock-up or vaguely functioning versions at this huge January trade show will reach market, many won't make announced release dates or target prices, and some will cut out promised features.Cynics call the most far-fetched unveilings "vaporware" -- mere wisps of an idea about as graspable as a cubic foot of hot air.This year's show, which ended Sunday, had its share of odd and blue-sky visions -- from an ultrasonic siren called "Pet Lover," which always hums in your car to gently scare animals out of the way, to a set of three beeper/message watches you can dole out to the kids and then use to call them home (within a 1 1/2 -mile range of the base station)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 23, 2012
Electronic Arts has reached preliminary settlement with the consumer protection law firm Hagens Berman, who filed suit against the company for violating antitrust and consumer protection laws in making its popular football video games. The settlement has not been approved by U.S District Court, but if it is confirmed as it stands, a $27 million fund would be set up to pay out purchasers of EA's football games since 2005. According to a press release by Hagens Berman, the suit was originally filed in 2008.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 23, 2008
Facebreaker (Electronic Arts) For Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 platforms. Rated Teen. Retail $49.99. ** games EA Sports' new marketing campaign is predicated on the idea that "everyone plays": Novices and experts alike can share in the fun simply by adjusting the level of controls. Though it's not a traditional EA Sports title, the arcade boxing game Facebreaker certainly doesn't abide by the company's new mantra. If this is supposed to be for everyone, why is the easiest skill level still really hard?
BUSINESS
By Alex Pham and Alex Pham,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 2004
Carnations and lilies were the final indignity. The bouquet, which arrived at her door on a sunny Saturday in September, were from her fiance, a video game programmer who was working his eighth consecutive 72-hour week. Far from being flattered, the woman poured out her anger and frustration in a 2,000-word essay that she posted on the Internet under the pseudonym "ea_spouse." "The love of my life comes home late at night complaining of a headache that will not go away and a chronically upset stomach," she wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | June 28, 2012
If video games were truly simulations of everyday life, would they be tedious and boring, or completely enthralling? That is the question Maxis poses with most of its games. “The Sims,” “Spore,” and “SimCity” are as much test tubes as they are pieces of entertainment media. They distill a portion of life as we know it into a controlled environment for us to tinker with. “SimCity,” first released in 1989, is the one that launched a perpetual wave of additional “Sim” titles and knockoffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 23, 2012
Electronic Arts has reached preliminary settlement with the consumer protection law firm Hagens Berman, who filed suit against the company for violating antitrust and consumer protection laws in making its popular football video games. The settlement has not been approved by U.S District Court, but if it is confirmed as it stands, a $27 million fund would be set up to pay out purchasers of EA's football games since 2005. According to a press release by Hagens Berman, the suit was originally filed in 2008.
BUSINESS
By Alison Matas, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
A federal judge last week threw out a Baltimore security guard's copyright infringement case against National Football League Properties, saying there was no evidence the NFL had licensed the use of the Ravens logo he'd designed to a software company. Frederick E. Bouchat has been credited with designing the Ravens' first logo, known as the "Flying B logo," and is awaiting compensation. In this most recent case, Bouchat claimed he wasn't getting credit for the use of the logo in some Madden NFL video games.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chip Carter and Chip Carter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2003
If they build it, will you come? That's the question Microsoft, "The House That Bill Built," and Electronic Arts, the 800-pound gorilla of the video game industry, are asking these days. Each company has created its own virtual field of dreams to lure rabid sports fans into the online console gaming arena. It's the first time these behemoths have gone head to head, and it promises to be interesting. Until now, the pair have had a working arrangement by dint of EA making games for Microsoft's Xbox - which it still does.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | June 28, 2012
If video games were truly simulations of everyday life, would they be tedious and boring, or completely enthralling? That is the question Maxis poses with most of its games. “The Sims,” “Spore,” and “SimCity” are as much test tubes as they are pieces of entertainment media. They distill a portion of life as we know it into a controlled environment for us to tinker with. “SimCity,” first released in 1989, is the one that launched a perpetual wave of additional “Sim” titles and knockoffs.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 23, 2008
Facebreaker (Electronic Arts) For Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 platforms. Rated Teen. Retail $49.99. ** games EA Sports' new marketing campaign is predicated on the idea that "everyone plays": Novices and experts alike can share in the fun simply by adjusting the level of controls. Though it's not a traditional EA Sports title, the arcade boxing game Facebreaker certainly doesn't abide by the company's new mantra. If this is supposed to be for everyone, why is the easiest skill level still really hard?
BUSINESS
By Alex Pham and Alex Pham,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 2004
Carnations and lilies were the final indignity. The bouquet, which arrived at her door on a sunny Saturday in September, were from her fiance, a video game programmer who was working his eighth consecutive 72-hour week. Far from being flattered, the woman poured out her anger and frustration in a 2,000-word essay that she posted on the Internet under the pseudonym "ea_spouse." "The love of my life comes home late at night complaining of a headache that will not go away and a chronically upset stomach," she wrote.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
Video games are a lot of things - a $7 billion-a-year industry, a source of entertainment for millions of Americans, a pop culture phenomenon that has spawned books and films and, some argue, a medium that glorifies violence. But the one thing they are not is tear-jerkers. At least until now. Tomorrow, game industry leader Electronic Arts releases The Sims 2, a souped-up sequel to the best-selling computer game of all time and an attempt to reach an emotional level rarely achieved by video games.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chip Carter and Jonathan Carter and Chip Carter and Jonathan Carter,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 18, 2004
Back in the day, we (well, at least one of us) used to haunt the arcades in and around Atlanta, banging the heck out of those old-timey baseball games you used to see everywhere. A steel ball would shoot out from beneath the pitcher's mound, and you'd try to swat it by pressing a lever that swung a bat. The ball would rocket around the inside of the machine, falling in a hole for an out or tagging a panel for a base hit. A really sweet swing would launch the ball over the outfield wall, sending a little metal runner scurrying around the bases.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chip Carter and Chip Carter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2003
If they build it, will you come? That's the question Microsoft, "The House That Bill Built," and Electronic Arts, the 800-pound gorilla of the video game industry, are asking these days. Each company has created its own virtual field of dreams to lure rabid sports fans into the online console gaming arena. It's the first time these behemoths have gone head to head, and it promises to be interesting. Until now, the pair have had a working arrangement by dint of EA making games for Microsoft's Xbox - which it still does.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chip Carter and Jonathan Carter and Chip Carter and Jonathan Carter,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 18, 2004
Back in the day, we (well, at least one of us) used to haunt the arcades in and around Atlanta, banging the heck out of those old-timey baseball games you used to see everywhere. A steel ball would shoot out from beneath the pitcher's mound, and you'd try to swat it by pressing a lever that swung a bat. The ball would rocket around the inside of the machine, falling in a hole for an out or tagging a panel for a base hit. A really sweet swing would launch the ball over the outfield wall, sending a little metal runner scurrying around the bases.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2004
A weekly briefing on the economic calendar Monday Earnings reports: 3M, Delta Air Lines, Legg Mason, Allstate, Kraft Foods Tuesday * Housing starts and building permits for June Earnings reports: Altria, Ameritrade, Boise Cascade, Ford Motor, Manpower, RadioShack, U.S. Bancorp, Wells Fargo, E*Trade, Motorola, Pixelworks, Sun Microsystems, Texas Instruments Wednesday Earnings reports: AT&T Wireless, Blockbuster, Eastman Kodak, Fannie Mae, General...
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 20, 1993
There ought to be a sign at the entrance of the Winter Consumer Electronics show in Las Vegas: "Suspend your disbelief at the door."While 90 percent of the high-tech products unveiled in mock-up or vaguely functioning versions at this huge January trade show will reach market, many won't make announced release dates or target prices, and some will cut out promised features.Cynics call the most far-fetched unveilings "vaporware" -- mere wisps of an idea about as graspable as a cubic foot of hot air.This year's show, which ended Sunday, had its share of odd and blue-sky visions -- from an ultrasonic siren called "Pet Lover," which always hums in your car to gently scare animals out of the way, to a set of three beeper/message watches you can dole out to the kids and then use to call them home (within a 1 1/2 -mile range of the base station)
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