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By JED KIRSCHBAUM | August 16, 1992
None of these photographs details an area as large as the period at the end of this sentence. They were taken with a camera attached to a scanning electron microscope at the University of maryland baltimore county .The process is known as scanning photomicrography, a fancy name for a way of exploring this tiny world's grandeur with Phillip Rutledge, 41, director of the electron microscope facility.First the yellow jacket was chemically preserved, then they were coated with a layer of gold palladium -- a metal that helps the tissue conduct and respond to the electron beam.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
Dr. Michael Beer, former chairman of the department of biophysics at the Johns Hopkins University who was an environmentalist who worked diligently to clean up and protect Stony Run and the Jones Falls, died Aug. 22. He was 88. Dr. Beer was dining with his companion, Patricia Laidlaw, at her Roland Park home when he was stricken with a heart attack. He was taken to Union Memorial, where he was pronounced dead, said his daughter, Suzanne C. Beer of Middle River. "In the early days of molecular microscopy he was one of the key figures," said Dr. Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, chairman of the department of biophysics at the Johns Hopkins University.
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NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 16, 2003
WINTER'S HERE, and you feel lousy: You're coughing and sneezing; your muscles ache; your nose is an active mucus volcano. These symptoms - so familiar at this time of year - can mean only one thing: tiny fanged snails are eating your brain. No, seriously, brain snails are involved only about 35 percent of the time. More likely what you have is a cold or flu. (The word "flu" is short for "the flu.") Colds and flus have plagued humanity for millions of years, but in primitive times, nobody knew what caused them, because everybody was stupid.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
Where have all the atheist gone? The protest that Carroll County Commissioner Robin B. Frazier County is making requires some debate ( "A delicate balance," March 27). Her Jesus does not exist in atheist communities. That raises the question of who is correct. I was challenged by a practicing atheist to prove that God existed. The argument to me was that without faith there is no evidence to support the thesis. That was 15 years ago. I have completed a study of the challenge and it does not bode well for the theological model of existence.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1996
Skiers and farmers will be glad someday that William Wergin tested his new $100,000 microscope attachment on snow scooped from his car rather than on mold scraped from an orange.His impulsive decision generated a first-of-its-kind study of snowflakes that scientists say could improve crop irrigation methods for water-strapped farms and predict avalanches in the Rockies.Mr. Wergin, who heads the electron microscope laboratory at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Service, has collected 5,000 flakes from across the country to be photographed and stored in subzero temperatures in tubes at the agency just outside the Capital Beltway.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
Where have all the atheist gone? The protest that Carroll County Commissioner Robin B. Frazier County is making requires some debate ( "A delicate balance," March 27). Her Jesus does not exist in atheist communities. That raises the question of who is correct. I was challenged by a practicing atheist to prove that God existed. The argument to me was that without faith there is no evidence to support the thesis. That was 15 years ago. I have completed a study of the challenge and it does not bode well for the theological model of existence.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | August 24, 2006
I am planning to sell my laptop (Toshiba Satellite 2800 series, about five years old) and want to know how I go about wiping out my hard drive of any personal information. I've been told that just reloading the operating software (Windows XP) will do this, but I want to know for sure. -Alexis Alvarez-Suzuki, aol.com Here's your answer in a nutshell A.A.: yes and no. By hauling out the original CDs for system recovery and then following the directions to reformat the hard drive and reinstall the operating system will cover a good chunk of the hard drive.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1997
Once a promising scientist close to earning his doctorate, Bogdan Dabrowski lost it all when a 1993 laboratory explosion at the Johns Hopkins University robbed him of a major portion of his eyesight and hearing. He couldn't work. He couldn't study. He was in constant pain.And then, his immigration visa expired.Yesterday, the Polish citizen, 48, who needs nearly constant medical care, asked an immigration judge not to deport him. She didn't. But new immigration quotas prevented her from issuing him a green card.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
Dr. Michael Beer, former chairman of the department of biophysics at the Johns Hopkins University who was an environmentalist who worked diligently to clean up and protect Stony Run and the Jones Falls, died Aug. 22. He was 88. Dr. Beer was dining with his companion, Patricia Laidlaw, at her Roland Park home when he was stricken with a heart attack. He was taken to Union Memorial, where he was pronounced dead, said his daughter, Suzanne C. Beer of Middle River. "In the early days of molecular microscopy he was one of the key figures," said Dr. Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, chairman of the department of biophysics at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
May 20, 1997
Scrutiny of water and mud samples found none of the microorganism that had been suspected of harming fish in a lower Eastern Shore river, a Maryland Department of Natural Resources spokesman said yesterday.John Surrick, the spokesman, said a scientist in Florida had tentatively identified Pfiesteria piscicida in the Pocomoke River samples sent to her.But a subsequent examination with an electron microscope indicated the presence of a less toxic microorganism.To allay fishermen's concerns about what may be causing sores on fish in the Pocomoke, state scientists plan to test the river from its mouth to Snow Hill.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | August 24, 2006
I am planning to sell my laptop (Toshiba Satellite 2800 series, about five years old) and want to know how I go about wiping out my hard drive of any personal information. I've been told that just reloading the operating software (Windows XP) will do this, but I want to know for sure. -Alexis Alvarez-Suzuki, aol.com Here's your answer in a nutshell A.A.: yes and no. By hauling out the original CDs for system recovery and then following the directions to reformat the hard drive and reinstall the operating system will cover a good chunk of the hard drive.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 16, 2003
WINTER'S HERE, and you feel lousy: You're coughing and sneezing; your muscles ache; your nose is an active mucus volcano. These symptoms - so familiar at this time of year - can mean only one thing: tiny fanged snails are eating your brain. No, seriously, brain snails are involved only about 35 percent of the time. More likely what you have is a cold or flu. (The word "flu" is short for "the flu.") Colds and flus have plagued humanity for millions of years, but in primitive times, nobody knew what caused them, because everybody was stupid.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1997
Once a promising scientist close to earning his doctorate, Bogdan Dabrowski lost it all when a 1993 laboratory explosion at the Johns Hopkins University robbed him of a major portion of his eyesight and hearing. He couldn't work. He couldn't study. He was in constant pain.And then, his immigration visa expired.Yesterday, the Polish citizen, 48, who needs nearly constant medical care, asked an immigration judge not to deport him. She didn't. But new immigration quotas prevented her from issuing him a green card.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1996
Skiers and farmers will be glad someday that William Wergin tested his new $100,000 microscope attachment on snow scooped from his car rather than on mold scraped from an orange.His impulsive decision generated a first-of-its-kind study of snowflakes that scientists say could improve crop irrigation methods for water-strapped farms and predict avalanches in the Rockies.Mr. Wergin, who heads the electron microscope laboratory at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Service, has collected 5,000 flakes from across the country to be photographed and stored in subzero temperatures in tubes at the agency just outside the Capital Beltway.
FEATURES
By JED KIRSCHBAUM | August 16, 1992
None of these photographs details an area as large as the period at the end of this sentence. They were taken with a camera attached to a scanning electron microscope at the University of maryland baltimore county .The process is known as scanning photomicrography, a fancy name for a way of exploring this tiny world's grandeur with Phillip Rutledge, 41, director of the electron microscope facility.First the yellow jacket was chemically preserved, then they were coated with a layer of gold palladium -- a metal that helps the tissue conduct and respond to the electron beam.
NEWS
May 9, 1997
The Rev. James Melvin Washington, 49, an expert on black American religious history, died Saturday after suffering a stroke in New York. Dr. Washington taught at Union Theological Seminary in Richmond, Va., for more than 20 years.The lecturer and preacher also edited "Conversations with God: Two Centuries of Prayers by African-Americans." He once said that reading such prayers was a way to recover the "spiritual disciplines that sustained my people through slavery, Jim and Jane Crowism and the civil rights movement."
NEWS
November 4, 1999
WESTERN Maryland College's new Science Center offers spectacular views from its glass-wall rear hallways, the inspiring vista of the Catoctin Mountains.But the educational outlook for the private Westminster college is even more impressive after last month's dedication of the four-story, 50,000-square-foot academic building. The $13.4-million center houses 21st-century laboratories and space for student research at an institution long recognized for its undergraduate scientific instruction.
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