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Electromagnetic Radiation

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By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | September 26, 1994
Anne Lukiewski envisions the cellular phone tower that may be built in her Ellicott City neighborhood and shudders."It's an invisible threat," said the Wilton Acres resident, who is fighting the construction of a 125-foot communications tower near Patapsco Middle School.Cellular One, a subsidiary of Southwestern Bell Mobile Systems Inc., wants to build the steel tower on land it leases from First Church of the Nazarene on Rogers Avenue. The tower would be about 185 feet from the school's soccer and football fields and about 450 feet from the school.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
A burst of charged solar particles hitting the Earth was expected to stir a dramatic show of the aurora borealis Thursday night, but cloudy conditions could kill chances of seeing it in Maryland. A coronal mass ejection, an event in which a burst of matter and electromagnetic radiation, was released from the sun Tuesday in Earth's direction. When such solar winds interact with Earth's magnetic field, it can create beautiful shows of what are known as the Northern Lights. Scientists expect the light show could come much further south than usual, making it possible to be seen in northern Maryland, according to AccuWeather.com . But slim chances of seeing the aurora here are expected to be made even slimmer by clouds forecast to move over the region by Thursday afternoon.
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NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | November 2, 1994
A radiation scientist told the county Board of Appeals last night that radio frequency energy from a proposed cellular phone tower near an Ellicott City middle school would have a "negligible" effect on students and area residents.But later in his testimony, Dr. John B. Osepchuk said he could not guarantee residents' safety after long-term exposure to the tower."It's impossible to prove a negative," said Dr. Osepchuk, who has studied microwave devices and radiation hazards for more than 25 years.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1999
More than 50 residents showed up at a meeting with Sprint PCS representatives at the Westminster library last night and loudly protested plans for construction of four cellular towers in the county.The towers would be located in Allan Baugher's orchards in Westminster and New Windsor, at the Beard Farm at 1706 Sullivan Road, and the Hoff Farm at 2815 Tracey Mill Road in Westminster.They are among eight towers in Carroll County that Sprint, a telecommunications company, is proposing. If approved by the Carroll County Planning and Zoning Commission, some towers could begin functioning as early as January.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | October 7, 1994
Members of an Ellicott City church, fearing that a proposed cellular phone tower would harm area children, are urging their leaders to rescind a lease allowing the tower to be built on church grounds."
NEWS
By Kieron F. Quinn | November 6, 1991
ROBERT PARK, a physicist at the University of Maryland, makes the "point" (Other Voices, Sept. 12) that 60-hertz magnetic fields are no more dangerous than artichokes or shoe polish.Clearly revealing why he is a professor of physics and not of biochemistry, epidemiology or medicine, Park advances increasingly tenuous analogies ultimately reaching the conclusion that dioxin, cyclamates and asbestos are not particularly harmful either.In a long and very detailed 1990 report, the Environmental Protection Agency concluded that electromagnetic radiation posed a "probable" cancer risk.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 8, 1992
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Women using VDTs that emit high levels of a certain kind of electromagnetic radiation have a tripled risk of miscarriage, Finnish researchers report.The new study takes a more comprehensive look at VDT magnetic fields than a previous U.S. study that found no such risk: It is the first study to look at many different models of VDTs and the first to closely examine what are called extremely low frequency fields of radiation.Published in the current issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology, the study will be released today.
NEWS
By Luther Young | April 7, 1991
After decades of listening for gravity waves with detectors that weren't sensitive enough, physicists are planning to build a device that could finally confirm the existence of the elusive ripples in space.The $211 million Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory, or LIGO, involves construction of two state-of-the-art detectors -- at U.S. locations at least 1,500 miles apart -- in huge L-shapes with arms more than 2 miles long.Designed and operated by scientists from the California Institute of Technology and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the observatory could expand knowledge of the cosmos as radically as X-ray and radio astronomy when those observational tools were born.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | June 25, 1991
In yesterday's editions of The Sun, the name of researcher Dr. Genevieve Matanoski of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health was misspelled in an article about electromagnetic radiation and cancer.The Sun regrets the error.A study of telephone linemen has added to the growing body of evidence that suggests low-level radiation from electric cables and devices may be responsible for some cancers.Cautioning that the verdict on electromagnetic fields is years away, Dr. Genevieve Matanowski of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health reported yesterday that telephone linemen who were exposed to the strongest fields were almost twice as likely to get leukemia as were linemen with average exposures.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | May 24, 1993
Big Blue is about to go green. IBM Personal Computer Co. is preparing to introduce a compact computer that addresses key issues of environmental interest -- energy conservation and electromagnetic radiation.The typical desktop computer uses 250 to 300 watts of power. But IBM's offering belongs to a new generation of computers, popularly called "green PCs," that will cut energy usage to less than 60 watts.Many of these new computers, as well as printers and monitors, are expected to be introduced next month as part of the Environmental Protection Agency's Energy Star program for encouraging conservation in the PC industry.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | November 2, 1994
A radiation scientist told the county Board of Appeals last night that radio frequency energy from a proposed cellular phone tower near an Ellicott City middle school would have a "negligible" effect on students and area residents.But later in his testimony, Dr. John B. Osepchuk said he could not guarantee residents' safety after long-term exposure to the tower."It's impossible to prove a negative," said Dr. Osepchuk, who has studied microwave devices and radiation hazards for more than 25 years.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | October 7, 1994
Members of an Ellicott City church, fearing that a proposed cellular phone tower would harm area children, are urging their leaders to rescind a lease allowing the tower to be built on church grounds."
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | September 26, 1994
Anne Lukiewski envisions the cellular phone tower that may be built in her Ellicott City neighborhood and shudders."It's an invisible threat," said the Wilton Acres resident, who is fighting the construction of a 125-foot communications tower near Patapsco Middle School.Cellular One, a subsidiary of Southwestern Bell Mobile Systems Inc., wants to build the steel tower on land it leases from First Church of the Nazarene on Rogers Avenue. The tower would be about 185 feet from the school's soccer and football fields and about 450 feet from the school.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | May 24, 1993
Big Blue is about to go green. IBM Personal Computer Co. is preparing to introduce a compact computer that addresses key issues of environmental interest -- energy conservation and electromagnetic radiation.The typical desktop computer uses 250 to 300 watts of power. But IBM's offering belongs to a new generation of computers, popularly called "green PCs," that will cut energy usage to less than 60 watts.Many of these new computers, as well as printers and monitors, are expected to be introduced next month as part of the Environmental Protection Agency's Energy Star program for encouraging conservation in the PC industry.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 8, 1992
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Women using VDTs that emit high levels of a certain kind of electromagnetic radiation have a tripled risk of miscarriage, Finnish researchers report.The new study takes a more comprehensive look at VDT magnetic fields than a previous U.S. study that found no such risk: It is the first study to look at many different models of VDTs and the first to closely examine what are called extremely low frequency fields of radiation.Published in the current issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology, the study will be released today.
NEWS
By Kieron F. Quinn | November 6, 1991
ROBERT PARK, a physicist at the University of Maryland, makes the "point" (Other Voices, Sept. 12) that 60-hertz magnetic fields are no more dangerous than artichokes or shoe polish.Clearly revealing why he is a professor of physics and not of biochemistry, epidemiology or medicine, Park advances increasingly tenuous analogies ultimately reaching the conclusion that dioxin, cyclamates and asbestos are not particularly harmful either.In a long and very detailed 1990 report, the Environmental Protection Agency concluded that electromagnetic radiation posed a "probable" cancer risk.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1999
More than 50 residents showed up at a meeting with Sprint PCS representatives at the Westminster library last night and loudly protested plans for construction of four cellular towers in the county.The towers would be located in Allan Baugher's orchards in Westminster and New Windsor, at the Beard Farm at 1706 Sullivan Road, and the Hoff Farm at 2815 Tracey Mill Road in Westminster.They are among eight towers in Carroll County that Sprint, a telecommunications company, is proposing. If approved by the Carroll County Planning and Zoning Commission, some towers could begin functioning as early as January.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
A burst of charged solar particles hitting the Earth was expected to stir a dramatic show of the aurora borealis Thursday night, but cloudy conditions could kill chances of seeing it in Maryland. A coronal mass ejection, an event in which a burst of matter and electromagnetic radiation, was released from the sun Tuesday in Earth's direction. When such solar winds interact with Earth's magnetic field, it can create beautiful shows of what are known as the Northern Lights. Scientists expect the light show could come much further south than usual, making it possible to be seen in northern Maryland, according to AccuWeather.com . But slim chances of seeing the aurora here are expected to be made even slimmer by clouds forecast to move over the region by Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | June 25, 1991
In yesterday's editions of The Sun, the name of researcher Dr. Genevieve Matanoski of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health was misspelled in an article about electromagnetic radiation and cancer.The Sun regrets the error.A study of telephone linemen has added to the growing body of evidence that suggests low-level radiation from electric cables and devices may be responsible for some cancers.Cautioning that the verdict on electromagnetic fields is years away, Dr. Genevieve Matanowski of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health reported yesterday that telephone linemen who were exposed to the strongest fields were almost twice as likely to get leukemia as were linemen with average exposures.
NEWS
By Luther Young | April 7, 1991
After decades of listening for gravity waves with detectors that weren't sensitive enough, physicists are planning to build a device that could finally confirm the existence of the elusive ripples in space.The $211 million Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory, or LIGO, involves construction of two state-of-the-art detectors -- at U.S. locations at least 1,500 miles apart -- in huge L-shapes with arms more than 2 miles long.Designed and operated by scientists from the California Institute of Technology and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the observatory could expand knowledge of the cosmos as radically as X-ray and radio astronomy when those observational tools were born.
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