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Electromagnetic Fields

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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | June 25, 1991
In yesterday's editions of The Sun, the name of researcher Dr. Genevieve Matanoski of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health was misspelled in an article about electromagnetic radiation and cancer.The Sun regrets the error.A study of telephone linemen has added to the growing body of evidence that suggests low-level radiation from electric cables and devices may be responsible for some cancers.Cautioning that the verdict on electromagnetic fields is years away, Dr. Genevieve Matanowski of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health reported yesterday that telephone linemen who were exposed to the strongest fields were almost twice as likely to get leukemia as were linemen with average exposures.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 2, 2002
Machines used to erase audio tapes at the National Security Agency did not cause two workers' health problems, an Anne Arundel County Circuit Court jury that was asked to rule on a $10 million lawsuit has found. The verdict, reached Tuesday night after about two hours of deliberation, ended a two-and-a-half week trial in which medical experts and scientists disagreed about whether the equipment caused a brain tumor in Thomas E. Van Meter, a retired NSA employee from Odenton, and a brain lesion in Tommy Gerald Grimes, a Severn man who still works for the agency.
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BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS and PETER H. LEWIS,New York Times News Service | May 6, 1991
Several recent studies have provided more information about the health effects of computer use, and one of them included what appears to be reassuring news about the effects of electromagnetic fields on pregnant women.Previous studies of video display terminal use among women have yielded conflicting and inconsistent results, producing growing concern among workers and managers about the prudence of assigning women of child-bearing age to computer-related jobs.Some studies have suggested -- but not proved -- a link between computer radiation and a variety of pregnancy problems, including miscarriage, birth defects and birth problems.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1999
Gene Wolfe is a tall, thin, drink of a man who at 76 hunts for water as a hobby.He may seem more like a typical Towson retiree sitting on the deck behind his home, sunning his legs, shading his eyes and discussing his latest achievement.But Wolfe is a dowser, someone who hikes into fields and forests armed with a small pendulum to tap into his inner self in search of water in the earth.Dowsing is a centuries-old art practiced these days by people who freely discuss energy fields and psychic powers -- and one that has generated increased interest as Maryland's worst drought in 70 years dries up wells.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff Paul Shread contributed to this story | May 23, 1991
Sandy Travis walks down leafy President Street near her home in the Eastport section of Annapolis and points out neighbors' houses."That woman has cancer, that person has cancer, and that person has cancer. And there's a transformer right over there," she says, singling out a utility pole across the street.Although scientists disagree on whether the electromagnetic fields generated by power lines can cause cancer, Travis says she wants a lot more answers before Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. expands the substation two blocks from her house and strings new power lines in her neighborhood.
NEWS
By Newsday | June 15, 1994
Women in electrical jobs are 38 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than other working women, according to a new study that found an even higher death rate among female telephone installers, repairers and line workers."
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | July 13, 1993
Personal computers -- or VDTs (video display terminals) -- have become so commonplace that it is estimated there are more than 30 million VDTs in use in the United States. The workplace has been transformed by this new technology, and much of the transformation involves women who work in front of terminals for hours each day.Women need to know what this enormous increase in working hours spent in front of VDTs means for their health.Q: Do computers (VDTs) pose a health risk for women?A: According to researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health's Center for VDT and Health Research, health concerns and VDT use have focused on two issues -- the first is in part a reaction to scientific research into the possible effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs)
NEWS
By Newsday | June 15, 1994
Women in electrical jobs are 38 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than other working women, according to a new study that found an even higher death rate among female telephone installers, repairers and line workers."
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | July 8, 1991
Annapolis Alderman Wayne C. Turner will ask the City Council to reject a major expansion of the city's Tyler Avenue power substation tonight, amid fierce public opposition fueled by fears that the project could pose a cancer risk.The Ward 6 Republican, whose district includes the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. substation, has proposed a resolution that would deny the utility's expansion.Turner had initially expressed support for the proposal, which would double the substation's capacity to meet increased demand for electricity.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | March 9, 1993
the Annapolis City Council voted last night to allow "conditional" expansion of the Tyler Avenue Substation despite council and community members' concerns about possible harmful electromagnetic emissions.The council voted 5-4 to approve an application by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. to expand the substation, over the objections of those who fear effects from the emissions of electromagnetic fields.Voting against the application were Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins and Aldermen Carl O. Snowden, D-Ward 5, Wayne Turner, R-Ward 6, and Theresa DeGraff, R-Ward 7.Two years ago, the council rejected the planned $2.5 million expansion of the substation because of neighborhood concern over reports linking electromagnetic fields (EMF)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 14, 1995
The world's largest group of physicists, the American Physical Society, has taken a stance on a contentious public health issue by saying it can find no evidence that the electromagnetic fields that radiate from power lines cause cancer.The group's statement, issued recently after years of quiet deliberation, appears to be the strongest such statement by a scientific society in the 15 years or so that the issue has been debated.The society said that groundless public fears about a possible link between power lines and cancer were diverting billions of dollars into mitigation work.
NEWS
By Newsday | June 15, 1994
Women in electrical jobs are 38 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than other working women, according to a new study that found an even higher death rate among female telephone installers, repairers and line workers."
NEWS
By Newsday | June 15, 1994
Women in electrical jobs are 38 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than other working women, according to a new study that found an even higher death rate among female telephone installers, repairers and line workers."
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 17, 1994
My friend had explained to me why he was such an unlikely candidate to die young."I don't drink; I don't smoke; I exercise, and I'm a vegetarian," he said. "I'm really a lousy candidate for this.""This" was a brain tumor. Which he died of a few weeks ago.I told this anecdote to a colleague who immediately asked: "Was your friend a gardener?"I really don't know, I said. Why?"The chemicals," he said. "I understand a lot of them can kill you."My college roommate, whose professional and personal life revolves around the game of golf, told me recently that he does things differently now."
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | July 13, 1993
Personal computers -- or VDTs (video display terminals) -- have become so commonplace that it is estimated there are more than 30 million VDTs in use in the United States. The workplace has been transformed by this new technology, and much of the transformation involves women who work in front of terminals for hours each day.Women need to know what this enormous increase in working hours spent in front of VDTs means for their health.Q: Do computers (VDTs) pose a health risk for women?A: According to researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health's Center for VDT and Health Research, health concerns and VDT use have focused on two issues -- the first is in part a reaction to scientific research into the possible effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs)
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | April 13, 1993
Annapolis lawmakers made clear last night that they want to limit electromagnetic emissions as they reluctantly voted to allow the controversial expansion of the Tyler Avenue substation.The City Council approved a series of stringent conditions that require Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. to monitor and contain the electromagnetic fields created by the power lines.Tyler Heights residents urged the council to "just say no" to the expansion. They argued that the conditions were meaningless because they're next to impossible to enforce.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | July 10, 1991
Annapolis lawmakers' decision to reject a city power substation expansion will lead to more costly "stopgap" measures to provide electricity and perhaps higher electric bills, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.officials said yesterday.But no power outages will result, said BG & E officials, who had repeatedly warned of potential blackouts unless the Tyler Avenue substation could be expanded.Following Monday night's City Council vote to deny the $3 millionexpansion because of fears that electromagnetic fields pose a cancerthreat, BG & E officials called such fears unjustified.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | August 27, 1992
Attorneys for Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. asked a Circuit Court judge yesterday to reverse an Annapolis City Council decision denying the utility permission to expand its power station on Tyler Avenue.BG&E is seeking to expand the station, at Tyler and Bay Ridge avenues, to provide power needed for the Annapolis area, said ** Harold Blumenthal, an attorney hired to argue the case.Mr. Blumenthal said the City Council improperly substituted its opinion last year when it overruled advice from the Public Service Commission in denying the special exception necessary expand the station.
NEWS
By SUE HALLER | March 16, 1993
With all that snow outside, it's hard to believe that spring is only a week away. And to make matters worse, schools are closed again today. Those of you who have been inside all weekend coping with cold kids, wet mittens, shoes and coats have to last another day.But it could be worse. You could have an 8-year-old running a temperature of 103 degrees the night before the Blizzard of 1993. That's what happened with our daughter Kassandra. She's well on her way to recovery now, but she is one unhappy little girl who did not get to play in the best snow of her life.
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