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NEWS
By Robert Mitchum and Robert Mitchum,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 2, 2007
Doctors have succeeded in "jump-starting" the brain of a man who had been barely conscious for six years with electrical stimulation, making it possible for him to speak a little and take food by mouth, doctors report. The 38-year-old man, whose identity was not released, had been in what is called a minimally conscious state for six years after suffering brain injury in an assault. He retained some language capability but was unable to communicate reliably beyond brief gestures and silent mouthing of words.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2011
Miltec UV International in Stevensville is a getting a $4.5 million federal grant to develop technology designed to reduce the cost of making lithium ion battery electrodes. The company is one of 40 across the country that is sharing $175 million in grants awarded by the U.S. Energy Department to make vehicle components that will help automakers attain recently announced fuel-efficiency standards. President Barack Obama last month announced fuel-efficiency standards for cars and light trucks that will bring fuel efficiency to 54.5 miles per gallon by model year 2025.
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NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,Los Angeles Times | July 26, 2008
People with otherwise untreatable depression improved in a small clinical trial after receiving electrical stimulation of a part of the brain that scientists believe regulates sadness. A report this week in the journal Biological Psychiatry said 12 of 20 patients with chronic major depression benefited from the electronic device - including seven whose disease went into remission. The benefits were sustained over the course of the one-year study, researchers said. "These were patients at the end of the road.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Playing a prime 9 p.m. slot at Miami's Ultra Music Festival earlier this year, Cut Copy made for an odd stage presence. The electronic and dance music bacchanal attended every March by thousands of ravers and wannabe ravers is dominated by brand-name DJs — Tiesto, Carl Cox. And yet, there was Cut Copy, in matching white suits — one of the few live bands on the three-day bill. It was a fitting move for a band that's always striven to blend rock and dance music, and has mostly succeeded.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 14, 2003
Actor Christopher Reeve has undergone an experimental surgery that doctors believe will enable him to breathe regularly without a respirator for the first time since he broke his neck in a horseback accident in 1995. Physicians at University Hospitals of Cleveland used minimally invasive surgery to implant tiny electrodes, which control his breathing by stimulating the muscles of his diaphragm with a pacemaker-like device. Using the device, the paralyzed Superman star is able to breathe without a respirator for 15 minutes at a time.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2011
Miltec UV International in Stevensville is a getting a $4.5 million federal grant to develop technology designed to reduce the cost of making lithium ion battery electrodes. The company is one of 40 across the country that is sharing $175 million in grants awarded by the U.S. Energy Department to make vehicle components that will help automakers attain recently announced fuel-efficiency standards. President Barack Obama last month announced fuel-efficiency standards for cars and light trucks that will bring fuel efficiency to 54.5 miles per gallon by model year 2025.
NEWS
By Bob Condor and Bob Condor,Chicago Tribune | June 11, 2000
When the American Academy of Pediatrics announced its first guidelines for diagnosing kids with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD or ADD) last month, a primary reason was to help prevent doctors from overprescribing drugs such as Ritalin for treatment. The fear is that too many doctors and parents alike turn to medications as the main option for handling what might be a child's misbehavior problems and not illness. Joel Lubar, for one, isn't surprised about the guidelines, which reportedly were three years in the making and debating.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2005
LOS ANGELES - Whether drawn as a cartoon or disguised as Catwoman, the striking features of Halle Berry are readily recognized by movie fans. That recognition is achieved by a surprisingly small group of brain cells, an international team of researchers reports in today's edition of the journal Nature. Most researchers had thought that specific memories were spread out over large groups of brain cells, or neurons. However, the new study showed that small clusters of cells responded to specific people or objects, such as Jennifer Aniston or the Sydney Opera House, regardless of changes in their appearance, and sometimes just by seeing the name of the objects.
NEWS
By Staff Writer | September 28, 1993
The small, hexagonal gas chamber on the second floor of the Maryland Penitentiary was last used on June 9, 1961.It was only 5 years old at the time. Until 1956, prisoners sentenced to death were hanged.Its last occupant was Nathaniel Lipscomb, convicted of murdering Mae Hall, Lottie Kite and Pearl Weiss, all of East Baltimore. The women were raped and strangled over a two-week period in late 1958 and early 1959.His lawyer, Robert B. Watts (later a judge) recalled: "There was no question he was guilty.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1997
Forget scratchy fight songs booming from a tower of speakers and a black-and-white scoreboard endlessly flickering downs, points and timeouts remaining.The $220 million Ravens stadium being built downtown is incorporating audio and video technology so cutting-edge that its planners say it will revolutionize the fan experience with animated graphics, multiple replay screens, computer-synchronized speakers -- and perhaps even a Barry Levinson film short.More than $10 million in specialized electronics will give controllers the ability to re-create the effect of a thundering squadron of jets swooping through the seating bowl, entering at one end zone and exiting at the opposite.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,Los Angeles Times | July 26, 2008
People with otherwise untreatable depression improved in a small clinical trial after receiving electrical stimulation of a part of the brain that scientists believe regulates sadness. A report this week in the journal Biological Psychiatry said 12 of 20 patients with chronic major depression benefited from the electronic device - including seven whose disease went into remission. The benefits were sustained over the course of the one-year study, researchers said. "These were patients at the end of the road.
NEWS
By Robert Mitchum and Robert Mitchum,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 2, 2007
Doctors have succeeded in "jump-starting" the brain of a man who had been barely conscious for six years with electrical stimulation, making it possible for him to speak a little and take food by mouth, doctors report. The 38-year-old man, whose identity was not released, had been in what is called a minimally conscious state for six years after suffering brain injury in an assault. He retained some language capability but was unable to communicate reliably beyond brief gestures and silent mouthing of words.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | July 6, 2007
Imagine building a robot so small that it looks like a fire ant, even when magnified by a factor of 50. Now picture the nano-sized David Beckham bot playing "soccer" on a field about one sixteenth the size of a quarter. Sound like a feat? For a handful of midshipmen and one recent graduate of the Naval Academy, it certainly was - given that there are no existing tiny robot parts, not to mention screwdrivers or hinges. The students spent much of the past year looking into microscopes and using chemistry and light to shape the tiny bots.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2005
LOS ANGELES - Whether drawn as a cartoon or disguised as Catwoman, the striking features of Halle Berry are readily recognized by movie fans. That recognition is achieved by a surprisingly small group of brain cells, an international team of researchers reports in today's edition of the journal Nature. Most researchers had thought that specific memories were spread out over large groups of brain cells, or neurons. However, the new study showed that small clusters of cells responded to specific people or objects, such as Jennifer Aniston or the Sydney Opera House, regardless of changes in their appearance, and sometimes just by seeing the name of the objects.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 14, 2003
Actor Christopher Reeve has undergone an experimental surgery that doctors believe will enable him to breathe regularly without a respirator for the first time since he broke his neck in a horseback accident in 1995. Physicians at University Hospitals of Cleveland used minimally invasive surgery to implant tiny electrodes, which control his breathing by stimulating the muscles of his diaphragm with a pacemaker-like device. Using the device, the paralyzed Superman star is able to breathe without a respirator for 15 minutes at a time.
BUSINESS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 3, 2000
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -There was a time when a military flak vest served as a symbol of Northern Ireland's terrorist troubles. But if a Maryland-owned firm gets its way, a medical vest designed to quickly detect heart attacks could help save lives worldwide, provide good jobs in Belfast and become a new symbol for a peaceful Northern Ireland. Meridian Medical Technologies of Columbia is embarking on a European launch of the PRIME ECG electrocardiac mapping system, created and manufactured in Belfast.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | December 12, 1990
Stunned by an electric current shooting through the water, hundreds of tiny black-nosed dace turned belly up and floated to the surface.Biologists, armed with electrodes, even ferreted a dozen or more eel out of the shadowy embankments of the Jabez Branch yesterday morning.But the brook trout were no where to be found."If they were there, they would come zooming out and boink their nose right into the screen (of the electrode)," said Mark Staley, a conservation associate with the state Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
By Bob Condor and Bob Condor,Chicago Tribune | June 11, 2000
When the American Academy of Pediatrics announced its first guidelines for diagnosing kids with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD or ADD) last month, a primary reason was to help prevent doctors from overprescribing drugs such as Ritalin for treatment. The fear is that too many doctors and parents alike turn to medications as the main option for handling what might be a child's misbehavior problems and not illness. Joel Lubar, for one, isn't surprised about the guidelines, which reportedly were three years in the making and debating.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1997
Forget scratchy fight songs booming from a tower of speakers and a black-and-white scoreboard endlessly flickering downs, points and timeouts remaining.The $220 million Ravens stadium being built downtown is incorporating audio and video technology so cutting-edge that its planners say it will revolutionize the fan experience with animated graphics, multiple replay screens, computer-synchronized speakers -- and perhaps even a Barry Levinson film short.More than $10 million in specialized electronics will give controllers the ability to re-create the effect of a thundering squadron of jets swooping through the seating bowl, entering at one end zone and exiting at the opposite.
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