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NEWS
May 20, 2013
Baltimore Gas & Electric certainly isn't likely to win any popularity contests. It secured a rate increase from the Public Service Commission in February - its second in the last three years - and turned around and filed a request for another one on Friday. And at the same time, the utility is asking the PSC for what may be unprecedented in Maryland: a surcharge on customers' monthly bills to pay for improvements to the electrical grid in advance. But as little as we may like it, the truth is that failing to make investments in maintaining the grid and improving its reliability is costing us dearly, too. It's just a harder cost to figure than the one that shows up at the bottom of our electric bills every month.
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NEWS
By Roger Berliner | July 30, 2013
For those of us in Maryland who have suffered from unacceptable electric utility service - and that is most of us - there is light at the end of the tunnel. Utility executives, think tanks and energy experts all agree: There is a utility revolution coming. It is a revolution that has been created by the innovative might of technology that is more powerful, superior and totally antithetical to the existing antiquated utility system. We call it Utility 2.0. It literally turns the existing utility paradigm on its head.
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NEWS
July 13, 2012
Much has been said about the power outages caused by recent storms, but one thing rarely mentioned is the importance of getting people off the electrical grid. It's a national security issue when so many people are rendered helpless in a neighborhoods because their electrical power all comes from the local utility. The government should continue to offer incentives for households to install solar panels, wind turbines or geothermal systems of whatever size. It would help if even one or two people on a block had an energy source besides the grid.
NEWS
May 20, 2013
Baltimore Gas & Electric certainly isn't likely to win any popularity contests. It secured a rate increase from the Public Service Commission in February - its second in the last three years - and turned around and filed a request for another one on Friday. And at the same time, the utility is asking the PSC for what may be unprecedented in Maryland: a surcharge on customers' monthly bills to pay for improvements to the electrical grid in advance. But as little as we may like it, the truth is that failing to make investments in maintaining the grid and improving its reliability is costing us dearly, too. It's just a harder cost to figure than the one that shows up at the bottom of our electric bills every month.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Each year in Arundel on the Bay, the neighborhood's power goes out five, six or seven times, leaving residents in the dark with refrigerators of spoiling food and without water, since their well pumps run on electricity. "There's a part of me that's really incredulous," resident Tim Hamilton said this week, unloading years of simmering frustration during a meeting with Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s supervisor of reliability. "I've never lived in a place where people buy generators like they live in a Third World country.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | August 20, 2003
IN ECONOMICS there's a heads for every tails, a pull for every push, and the happy reciprocal of the Blackout of 2003 will be the purchase of billions of dollars' worth of electrical transmission hardware. Capital projects with 10-figure price tags are what the U.S. economy needs. We have too many factories, too much telephone cable and plenty of office buildings. Business investment has all but dried up as a result, with lugubrious economic effects. What we don't have enough of are wires, switches, circuit breakers, poles and towers for moving electrical power across the land, a situation underscored by the recent northern darkness.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2003
A power transmission loop surrounding Lake Erie became the focus yesterday of the investigation into the biggest blackout in U.S. history. But the chain of events that led to the shutdown of a vast electrical grid in mere seconds, cutting power to about 50 million people in the Northeastern United States and Canada, remained a mystery to energy experts. They said it could take weeks to pinpoint a cause. Yesterday, as utilities were able to restore more than half the electricity lost in cities from Toronto to New York, investigators were assessing the causes and consequences of an extraordinary reversal in the flow of power on the "Lake Erie loop" that occurred just after 4 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
Say this for Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., they have a curious sense of timing. Six years ago, they sought a 72 percent rate increase at the same time that their parent company was seeking approval for a merger - and in the middle of a gubernatorial election. That didn't go so well. Now the company is seeking a rate increase - albeit a much more modest one - just after hundreds of thousands of its customers were without power, some of them for more than a week, raising the ire of residents and politicians alike.
NEWS
By Rebecca Cole and Rebecca Cole,Tribune Washington Bureau | April 26, 2009
WASHINGTON -One warm August afternoon in 2003, a power failure originating in Ohio coursed through the northeastern section of the electrical grid, sparking the nation's largest blackout ever and leaving millions in eight states without air conditioning, traffic lights or cell phone service. A "smart grid" might have averted a shutdown that cost an estimated $6 billion. That new grid - a digital network allowing utilities, consumers and alternative sources of renewable energy to "talk" to one another - could steer electricity to where it is needed most, avert cascading energy bottlenecks and promote power from alternative sources.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2011
Electric wagons powered by heavy batteries quietly zipped through the streets of Baltimore, carrying beer, milk, fruit and other goods from wholesalers to shops and homes. Some delivery companies installed their own charging stations or used a downtown garage maintained by the local utility to charge their wagons overnight. This experimental period in transportation wasn't during the gasoline price shocks of the early 1970s. Try 1911. Electric vehicles would grow to account for about one-quarter of the automobiles in the United States by the 1920s, historians estimate.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Each year in Arundel on the Bay, the neighborhood's power goes out five, six or seven times, leaving residents in the dark with refrigerators of spoiling food and without water, since their well pumps run on electricity. "There's a part of me that's really incredulous," resident Tim Hamilton said this week, unloading years of simmering frustration during a meeting with Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s supervisor of reliability. "I've never lived in a place where people buy generators like they live in a Third World country.
NEWS
October 3, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to force Maryland utilities to harden their systems against the kind of damage we saw in the summer's derecho storm raised immediate concerns among consumer advocates. The reason: It could add a dollar or two a month to residential customers' bills to compensate utilities for trimming trees, burying power lines and other activities that advocates say companies like Baltimore Gas & Electric and Pepco ought to be doing anyway. The criticism is particularly pointed in the case of Pepco, which was fined $1 million last year by the Public Service Commission for failing to invest sufficiently in that kind of grid maintenance.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
Say this for Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., they have a curious sense of timing. Six years ago, they sought a 72 percent rate increase at the same time that their parent company was seeking approval for a merger - and in the middle of a gubernatorial election. That didn't go so well. Now the company is seeking a rate increase - albeit a much more modest one - just after hundreds of thousands of its customers were without power, some of them for more than a week, raising the ire of residents and politicians alike.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley set up a work group Wednesday to propose ways of improving the resiliency of the state's electrical grid in storms, seeking to avoid prolonged outages such as the ones experienced by Baltimore Gas and Electric and Pepco customers this month. O'Malley announced that he has directed his chief energy adviser, Abigail Hopper, to bring together state agencies to seek expert recommendations on improvements in the state's energy infrastructure. Among the issues the group has been asked to examine are the feasibility of underground power lines and how to pay for capital investments in the energy system.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
Much has been said about the power outages caused by recent storms, but one thing rarely mentioned is the importance of getting people off the electrical grid. It's a national security issue when so many people are rendered helpless in a neighborhoods because their electrical power all comes from the local utility. The government should continue to offer incentives for households to install solar panels, wind turbines or geothermal systems of whatever size. It would help if even one or two people on a block had an energy source besides the grid.
NEWS
By Michael J. Kormos | August 29, 2011
Wind generators or windmills are sprouting up all over the United States. They're part of a growing move to expand the use of renewable energy sources, like wind and the sun, to produce electricity. Examples are everywhere. Construction of a 50-megawatt wind farm was just completed in New Mexico. Shovels will break ground in Indiana later this year for an even larger 100-megawatt wind farm. Contracts have been signed for a 49-megawatt solar project inOhio. Technology companies like Google are investing large amounts in renewable energy, including offshore wind projects along the Atlantic coast, because they recognize that it's the future.
NEWS
June 30, 2010
The Baltimore Building and Construction Trades Council and its members know all too well the importance of an adequate infrastructure to the stability of our economy. Our well-trained and skilled membership work on water, sewer and road projects; we also work on all types of industrial projects. We see every day why not only our area, but the nation needs to have a strong, reliable infrastructure. Many times our elected officials use water, roads and sewer projects as a political platform to get elected; these projects are supported by us citizens and rightly so. But there is one vital part of the infrastructure that goes unnoticed and taken for granted — our electrical transmission grid system.
NEWS
July 1, 2010
The dust-up in Maryland over the Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. smart grid proposal highlights the importance of utilities, regulators and other stakeholders having a clear understanding about the range of potential benefits of smart grid technologies and the need to design smart grid plan expressly to achieve those goals. The California Public Utilities Commission took a big step in the right direction recently when it approved a comprehensive plan to maximize the environment and consumer benefits of smart grid technologies.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2011
Electric wagons powered by heavy batteries quietly zipped through the streets of Baltimore, carrying beer, milk, fruit and other goods from wholesalers to shops and homes. Some delivery companies installed their own charging stations or used a downtown garage maintained by the local utility to charge their wagons overnight. This experimental period in transportation wasn't during the gasoline price shocks of the early 1970s. Try 1911. Electric vehicles would grow to account for about one-quarter of the automobiles in the United States by the 1920s, historians estimate.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
Fierce, early-summer heat continued Wednesday to take a harsh toll on Maryland. High temperatures were blamed for one death in Baltimore. They strained the electrical grid, worsened spreading crop damage and exhausted some who had to be outdoors. The afternoon temperature at BWI-Marshall Airport peaked at 101 degrees, breaking the day's 99-degree record, last reached in 1993. It was the second straight day of record-breaking, triple-digit weather. It also marked the 25th day of 90-degree-plus temperatures this year, and the fifth 100-degree day. Both marks are new records for Baltimore temperatures through July 7. Triple-digit temperatures were also reported again from Richmond, Va., up through Washington, Philadelphia and New York City.
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