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By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | July 28, 1991
County electrical inspectors are checking equipment in tanning salons countywide after a woman reported she was burned in a Bel Air hair salon's tanning bed last weekend, said G. Thomas Dick, chief electrical inspector."
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December 27, 2012
Alexander Kinyua, an electrical engineering student at Morgan State University, was charged with the first-degree murder of his roommate 37-year-old Kujoe Bonsafo Agyei-Kodie. Kinyua allegedly hadn't just killed the man, but also had eaten his heart and portions of his brain. The victim's severed head and hands were found in the men's Joppa home. Additional remains were found in a nearby church's trash container. Kinyua was indicted on charges of first-degree murder and assault and had been sent to a Maryland state mental hospital.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 11, 1994
John Herling, an author and newsletter publisher who chronicled the rise of organized labor, died last Thursday in a nursing home in Wheaton. He was 88.He had Parkinson's disease and died of pneumonia, said his brother, Albert.He published the John Herling Labor Letter in Washington from 1950 until 1990 and was a syndicated columnist specializing in labor affairs.His books included "The Right to Challenge: People and Power in the Steelworkers Union" (1972). It told of intrigue in the United Steelworkers of America.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
A lab at the University of Maryland College Park was damaged by an electrical fire Monday afternoon that was extinguished by firefighters, Prince George's County Fire Department spokesman Mark Brady said. With the Martin Luther King, Jr., holiday, there were a limited number of people in the J.M. Patterson Building on Regents Drive, and they were evacuated safely, he said. No chemicals or hazardous materials were involved, although the Fire Departmentn's Hazardous Materials Team was alerted as a precaution, he said.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | April 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Stepping back from the edge of a potential trade war, the United States and Europe agreed yesterday to break down barriers to government purchases of American-made turbines, generators and other heavy electric equipment.But the Clinton administration and the European Community failed to reach agreement after two days of negotiations and trans-Atlantic telephone calls on measures to remove obstacles to European government purchases of U.S. telecommunications equipment, another stumbling block to expanded trade.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | November 17, 1992
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell yesterday on concerns that fourth-quarter earnings in the airline and electrical equipment industries will be below expectations."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 12, 2000
WASHINGTON - Inventories at U.S. wholesalers rose twice as quickly as sales in May, government statistics showed yesterday, a further sign the economy cooled in the second quarter. Wholesale inventories increased 0.8 percent in May after rising 0.9 percent in April as stockpiles of imported automobiles, machinery and electrical equipment increased, the Commerce Department reported. Sales at wholesalers grew 0.4 percent in May, up from a 0.3 percent rise a month earlier. "Consumers simply took a breather, ..."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | January 12, 1993
NEW YORK -- A firming in Treasury bond prices lifted U.S. stocks from a two-day slump, as over-the-counter issues sprinted to a record yesterday."The fact that the bond market has stabilized has helped" stocks, said Peter Canelo, chief investment strategist at NatWest Securities.Stock prices closed at session highs following a flurry of computerguided buy orders just before the close, according to Birinyi Associates. A resumption of the rally in computer, software, and semiconductor shares, combined with rebounds in battered blue chips like Merck & Co., buoyed share prices as well, traders said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- U.S. factory orders for big-ticket goods rose in September for the fourth month in a row, the government reported yesterday, in a sign that rising demand could lead to stronger-than-expected growth in the months ahead."
NEWS
March 23, 1991
Karen K. O'NeillActive in GambrillsA Mass of Christian burial for Karen K. O'Neill, who was active in the Gambrills community, will be offered at 11 a.m. today at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Roman Catholic Church in Crofton.Mrs. O'Neill, who was 41 and lived in Gambrills, died Wednesday of cancer at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.A native of Baltimore, the former Karen Kelly attended Catonsville High School before moving with her family to Charlottesville, Va., where she graduated from Albemarle High School.
NEWS
By Julie Turkewitz and Julie Turkewitz,Sun Reporter | July 11, 2007
For years, residents have called the brick compound in Seton Hill a "fortress," a physical barrier between their historic community and its neighbors, Bolton Hill and Mount Vernon. The high-walled, khaki-colored brick structure squeezed between North Paca and North Eutaw streets, just north of St. Mary's Park, has been there for decades. Now, BGE plans to build an electric substation inside -- one the company says is necessary to accommodate the city's growing power needs. But residents say that if BGE plans to make such a permanent footprint in their community, the outside walls of the compound should be redesigned to be neighborhood-friendly and in sync with Baltimore's plans to create visually appealing, pedestrian-friendly thoroughfares.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2000
More than 200 Comcast Online customers in Howard and Baltimore counties have discovered that electrical storms can knock you offline a lot faster than signing off yourself. A series of storms that rolled through the area around the weekend of July 15 fatally shocked the modems and network adapters used by computer owners who connect to the Internet through Comcast. Comcast officials said last week that they had fixed almost all of the problems by replacing the damaged hardware. But long delays in replacing equipment had many customers grumbling, including several who called The Sun. Technicians said most of the problems were the result of equipment plugged into ungrounded electrical outlets, according to Scott Allison, general manager for Comcast Online.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 12, 2000
WASHINGTON - Inventories at U.S. wholesalers rose twice as quickly as sales in May, government statistics showed yesterday, a further sign the economy cooled in the second quarter. Wholesale inventories increased 0.8 percent in May after rising 0.9 percent in April as stockpiles of imported automobiles, machinery and electrical equipment increased, the Commerce Department reported. Sales at wholesalers grew 0.4 percent in May, up from a 0.3 percent rise a month earlier. "Consumers simply took a breather, ..."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- U.S. factory orders for big-ticket goods rose in September for the fourth month in a row, the government reported yesterday, in a sign that rising demand could lead to stronger-than-expected growth in the months ahead."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 28, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Orders to U.S. factories for big-ticket goods rebounded in January, and analysts said that increases the chance the Federal Reserve may boost interest rates to cool an economy that shows signs of picking up speed.Electronics and electrical equipment, down the previous two months, led last month's stronger-than-expected 3.6 percent increase in factory orders -- the first overall gain in three months. Orders also advanced for primary metals, motor vehicles and parts and aircraft, the Commerce Department said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | February 29, 1996
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell yesterday in a late-day plunge sparked by a retreat in bonds and five rounds of computer-guided selling. Electrical equipment and oil shares led the decline.Concern that rising bond yields will stunt corporate profit growth sent stocks lower for a third day in a row. The market's rally during the first six weeks of this year was built on the prospect that falling borrowing costs would revive earnings.The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 43.00 to 5,506.21. The average tumbled 50 points in the last hour of trading, triggering the New York Stock Exchange's "uptick rule" five minutes before the close to limit computer-driven trades and stabilize the market.
NEWS
By Julie Turkewitz and Julie Turkewitz,Sun Reporter | July 11, 2007
For years, residents have called the brick compound in Seton Hill a "fortress," a physical barrier between their historic community and its neighbors, Bolton Hill and Mount Vernon. The high-walled, khaki-colored brick structure squeezed between North Paca and North Eutaw streets, just north of St. Mary's Park, has been there for decades. Now, BGE plans to build an electric substation inside -- one the company says is necessary to accommodate the city's growing power needs. But residents say that if BGE plans to make such a permanent footprint in their community, the outside walls of the compound should be redesigned to be neighborhood-friendly and in sync with Baltimore's plans to create visually appealing, pedestrian-friendly thoroughfares.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | February 29, 1996
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell yesterday in a late-day plunge sparked by a retreat in bonds and five rounds of computer-guided selling. Electrical equipment and oil shares led the decline.Concern that rising bond yields will stunt corporate profit growth sent stocks lower for a third day in a row. The market's rally during the first six weeks of this year was built on the prospect that falling borrowing costs would revive earnings.The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 43.00 to 5,506.21. The average tumbled 50 points in the last hour of trading, triggering the New York Stock Exchange's "uptick rule" five minutes before the close to limit computer-driven trades and stabilize the market.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 11, 1994
John Herling, an author and newsletter publisher who chronicled the rise of organized labor, died last Thursday in a nursing home in Wheaton. He was 88.He had Parkinson's disease and died of pneumonia, said his brother, Albert.He published the John Herling Labor Letter in Washington from 1950 until 1990 and was a syndicated columnist specializing in labor affairs.His books included "The Right to Challenge: People and Power in the Steelworkers Union" (1972). It told of intrigue in the United Steelworkers of America.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | April 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Stepping back from the edge of a potential trade war, the United States and Europe agreed yesterday to break down barriers to government purchases of American-made turbines, generators and other heavy electric equipment.But the Clinton administration and the European Community failed to reach agreement after two days of negotiations and trans-Atlantic telephone calls on measures to remove obstacles to European government purchases of U.S. telecommunications equipment, another stumbling block to expanded trade.
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