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August 12, 2005
Joseph William Argabright Sr., a retired Hampden electrical contractor, died of pneumonia Aug. 4 at the Oak Crest Village retirement community, where he had lived for the past eight years. The former Towson resident was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised on Schenley Road, he was a 1937 graduate of City College. During World War II he served in the Army Air Forces and was stationed in the South Pacific. After the war he joined and eventually became owner of his father's electrical contracting business, Joseph H. Argabright & Son, on Chestnut Avenue in Hampden, and retired in 1985 as a master electrician.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
Relatives of a 14-year-old girl who was electrocuted on a Druid Hill Park softball field said they plan to pursue further legal action against the city after a Baltimore Circuit Court judge dismissed some parts of a civil suit they filed against an electrical contractor in the incident. But Judge Shirley M. Watts denied a defense motion to dismiss other parts of the lawsuit, including negligence, that might go to a jury trial, while requesting more briefs. Deanna Green had been stretching before a church softball game in May 2006 when she touched two fences, one of which was touching an underground cable, according to authorities.
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NEWS
June 19, 2007
Edwin Francis Miller, a retired electrical contractor and World War II veteran, died of kidney failure Friday at his Towson home. He was 81. Born in Baltimore County and raised in Towson, he was a 1943 graduate of Towson High School. He enlisted in the Navy and participated in the invasions of Iwo Jima and Okinawa in the Pacific. He spent three years as an electrician aboard LST 588, a landing ship for tanks, troops and equipment. After the war he went into that line of work. "He brought the Marines into Iwo Jima," said his wife of 57 years, the former Dorothy Jane Kauffman.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 5, 2009
James Synodinos, a retired electrical contractor who enjoyed collecting and driving vintage automobiles, died of cancer Sunday at Franklin Square Hospital Center. He was 68. Mr. Synodinos was born in Baltimore and raised on Pelham Avenue in Mayfield. He was a 1958 graduate of Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, where he studied aviation mechanics. Trained as an electrician, Mr. Synodinos was a member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 24. He established Synodinos and Associates, a commercial electrical contracting firm, in 1980.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 29, 1995
John Warder Janney Jr., an electrical contractor who supervised the wiring of 17 branches of the Enoch Pratt Free Library during the 1950s, died of heart failure Dec. 15 at the Meridian Nursing Center in Parkville. He was 84.At his death, he was the oldest member of the Baltimore County Electrical Contractors Association.After graduating from City College in 1929, he began his career with Western Electric Co. and worked in the field for the next 60 years. During World War II and the Korean War, he helped wire ships at Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co.In 1956, as a supervisor for Wylie Plumbing and Heating Co., he oversaw the wiring of 17 neighborhood Pratt branches and later supervised rewiring of the Montebello water-filtration plant.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | October 29, 1994
Horace A. Palmer, a retired electrical contractor, died Wednesday of cancer at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Monkton resident was 62.He retired this year from Palmer Electric, which he founded in 1967, for health reasons.For years, Mr. Palmer ate breakfast and lunch almost daily at the Wagon Wheel on York Road, the only restaurant in Hereford, which named a sandwich after him.Betty Winner, owner of the restaurant, said, "If he was within 10 miles of this place, he'd come for breakfast and lunch, and always sat at what we call the 'B.S.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 20, 2006
Francis X. Singleton, an electrical contractor who was active in his industry's professional associations, died of cancer Sunday at his Pasadena home. He was 71. Born in Baltimore and raised in Hampden, he attended St. Thomas Aquinas parochial school and was a 1953 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School. He had been active in the Catholic Youth Organization. He served in the Naval Reserve and earned his master electrician's license while working for Charles Schleicher Plumbing and Leishear Contracting.
NEWS
November 13, 1994
Philip StinchcombElectrical contractorPhilip Stinchcomb, a retired Baltimore electrical contractor, died Oct. 31 of complications of cancer in a nursing home in Oxnard, Calif.Mr. Stinchcomb, who was 85 and moved to Oxnard from Crisfield in 1971, retired in 1961 as president of Philip Stinchcomb Inc.A native of the Joppa area, he attended the University of California at Los Angeles for two years after moving to California.Mr. Stinchcomb wrote several short stories that were published, and was writing three books when he died.
NEWS
July 17, 1991
Charles H. Neal, 85, an electrical contractor, died Sunday at St. Agnes Hospital after a stroke.Funeral services were being held today at the Leroy M. and Russell C. Witzke funeral establishment, 1630 Edmondson Ave. in Catonsville.Mr. Neal, who lived on North Prospect Avenue in Catonsville, wasa partner in Charles H. Neal & Son, the electrical contracting company he started in 1946 after working for many years for the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.Born in Reedville, Va., he was educated there and, after coming to Baltimore as a youth, at the Strayer Business College.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1995
Lewis F. Leister Sr., a retired electrical contractor and decorated World War II veteran, died Monday of complications of emphysema at St. Joseph Medical Center. The lifelong Perry Hall resident was 74.Mr. Leister served during World War II as a radar technician and powerhouse engineer with the 8th and 9th Air Forces. As a member of the 566th Signal Aircraft Warning Battalion, he participated in the Normandy invasion, the Battle of the Bulge and the Rhineland Campaign."I think it was ironic that he died on V-E Day," said a son, Lewis F. Leister Jr. of Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN REPORTER | November 12, 2007
Real estate agents offering to help defense workers find homes. Law firms peddling their expertise in negotiating military contracts. Management and sales consultants tendering advice on how to sell to the government or contractors. The huge nationwide military base shuffle has spawned a cottage industry of businesses and entrepreneurs hoping to cash in on the influx of up to 60,000 jobs and 28,000 households to Maryland.
NEWS
June 19, 2007
Edwin Francis Miller, a retired electrical contractor and World War II veteran, died of kidney failure Friday at his Towson home. He was 81. Born in Baltimore County and raised in Towson, he was a 1943 graduate of Towson High School. He enlisted in the Navy and participated in the invasions of Iwo Jima and Okinawa in the Pacific. He spent three years as an electrician aboard LST 588, a landing ship for tanks, troops and equipment. After the war he went into that line of work. "He brought the Marines into Iwo Jima," said his wife of 57 years, the former Dorothy Jane Kauffman.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 20, 2006
Francis X. Singleton, an electrical contractor who was active in his industry's professional associations, died of cancer Sunday at his Pasadena home. He was 71. Born in Baltimore and raised in Hampden, he attended St. Thomas Aquinas parochial school and was a 1953 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School. He had been active in the Catholic Youth Organization. He served in the Naval Reserve and earned his master electrician's license while working for Charles Schleicher Plumbing and Leishear Contracting.
NEWS
August 12, 2005
Joseph William Argabright Sr., a retired Hampden electrical contractor, died of pneumonia Aug. 4 at the Oak Crest Village retirement community, where he had lived for the past eight years. The former Towson resident was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised on Schenley Road, he was a 1937 graduate of City College. During World War II he served in the Army Air Forces and was stationed in the South Pacific. After the war he joined and eventually became owner of his father's electrical contracting business, Joseph H. Argabright & Son, on Chestnut Avenue in Hampden, and retired in 1985 as a master electrician.
NEWS
November 22, 2000
Cleary Cyril Chance, 83 financial examiner Cleary Cyril Chance, a retired U.S. Postal Service financial examiner, died Monday of heart failure at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. He was 83 and had lived in Parkville before moving to Brightview Assisted Living in Bel Air two years ago. In 1975, Mr. Chance retired from the downtown post office, where he had worked for nearly 30 years. He began as a clerk, advanced to foreman of mails, then route examiner and finally became a senior finance examiner.
NEWS
March 19, 2000
Jonathan M. Chatman, 60 city housing inspector Jonathan Maxwell Chatman, a retired city Housing Department inspector, died Monday of cancer at his Northwest Baltimore home. He was 60. Mr. Chatman, known as Maxwell, worked as a housing inspector for 30 years until retiring last year. Born and raised in Baltimore, Mr. Chatman was a 1957 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. He attended Morehouse College and Lincoln University and briefly taught in Baltimore public schools. He worked as a waiter for Harry M. Stevens Inc., caterers at Maryland racetracks, before joining the city Housing Department in 1969.
NEWS
July 17, 1991
B. Hayden Pentz Jr.Waverly Press inspectorServices for B. Hayden Pentz Jr., a quality-assurance inspector for Waverly Press in Easton, will be held at 11 a.m. today at Christ Episcopal Church in St. Michaels.Mr. Pentz, who was 34 and lived in St. Michaels, died Sunday of a respiratory illness at Peninsula General Hospital.He had worked for Waverly Press since his graduation from St. Michaels High School in 1975.He was born in Milwaukee but moved to the Eastern Shore with his parents as a child.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
Relatives of a 14-year-old girl who was electrocuted on a Druid Hill Park softball field said they plan to pursue further legal action against the city after a Baltimore Circuit Court judge dismissed some parts of a civil suit they filed against an electrical contractor in the incident. But Judge Shirley M. Watts denied a defense motion to dismiss other parts of the lawsuit, including negligence, that might go to a jury trial, while requesting more briefs. Deanna Green had been stretching before a church softball game in May 2006 when she touched two fences, one of which was touching an underground cable, according to authorities.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 29, 1995
John Warder Janney Jr., an electrical contractor who supervised the wiring of 17 branches of the Enoch Pratt Free Library during the 1950s, died of heart failure Dec. 15 at the Meridian Nursing Center in Parkville. He was 84.At his death, he was the oldest member of the Baltimore County Electrical Contractors Association.After graduating from City College in 1929, he began his career with Western Electric Co. and worked in the field for the next 60 years. During World War II and the Korean War, he helped wire ships at Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co.In 1956, as a supervisor for Wylie Plumbing and Heating Co., he oversaw the wiring of 17 neighborhood Pratt branches and later supervised rewiring of the Montebello water-filtration plant.
NEWS
August 28, 1995
Herbert Wilson FordElectrical contractorHerbert Wilson Ford, a retired Finksburg electrical contractor and a 29th Infantry Division veteran of World War II, died Friday of complications from cancer at the Westminster Nursing and Convalescent Center. He was 80.Most of Mr. Ford's 35 years as a contractor were spent in Carroll and Baltimore counties. He began his career with the Louis E. Susemihl Electric Co., becoming its owner when Mr. Susemihl died about 20 years ago. Mr. Ford had been a part-time electrical inspector for Middle Department Inspection Agency for five years.
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