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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
Sick Santa Fes, troubled Thomases and hospitalized Hogwarts Expresses make unscheduled stops this time of year in an Overlea basement that amounts to an electric train emergency room. Brian Kirsch, a 54-year-old Verizon cable splicer, spends his Sundays and nights at a workbench, repairing trains that just won't run right. "As a kid I just liked taking things apart and seeing how they worked," he said one day last week as he lifted out the innards of a Baltimore and Ohio Railroad steam engine marked Royal Blue.
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | December 7, 2012
When I heard that Highlandtown had rolled out another holiday train garden, I hailed a cab and told the driver to take me to the Conkling Street firehouse. What I found was the authentic thing. Train gardens in firehouses are a wonderful tradition. This Highlandtown version is a community-based, all-volunteer project. Donors and local businesses come up with about $3,800. A raffle and public donations allow the electric trains to keep running on the $5,000 annual budget. And there are some beauties here, acknowledging the neighborhood's industrial heritage.
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FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1997
A set of circa-1915 Baltimore-made toy electric trains, wrapped in brittle newspapers and stored away for the past 40 years, could be bid up to the cost of a new Ford Explorer when sold today at a local auction house.The pair of locomotives and an electric streetcar, with nine freight and passenger cars in their original pasteboard boxes, were produced before World War I by an electric motor company named Voltamp and modeled after B&O Railroad trains and city trolleys. The dozen pieces could sell for more than $30,000 at a Greenberg auction at the Sykesville-Freedom Fire Company in Sykesville.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
Sick Santa Fes, troubled Thomases and hospitalized Hogwarts Expresses make unscheduled stops this time of year in an Overlea basement that amounts to an electric train emergency room. Brian Kirsch, a 54-year-old Verizon cable splicer, spends his Sundays and nights at a workbench, repairing trains that just won't run right. "As a kid I just liked taking things apart and seeing how they worked," he said one day last week as he lifted out the innards of a Baltimore and Ohio Railroad steam engine marked Royal Blue.
BUSINESS
By Tim Jones and Tim Jones,Chicago Tribune | July 25, 2007
Somewhere up in roundhouse heaven, the 19th-century railroad barons who fought ruthlessly for coast-to-coast dominance must be shaking their heads over the great modern day courtroom clash of the toy train titans. The trade-secret fight between Columbia's MTH Electric Trains, formerly known as Mike's Train House Inc., and suburban Detroit model-train icon Lionel LLC, once the world's biggest toy maker but now in bankruptcy, has generated reams of court filings and countless billable hours from lawyers over design drawings for model trains.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
For model train fans, Christmas is the time to dust off the layout, gather the family around and permit the odoriferous mix of pine needles, lubricating oil and ozone to summon pleasant memories of childhood. But, for model train maker M.T.H. Electric Trains of Columbia, this season is bittersweet. It won a $41 million judgment this year against the venerable granddaddy of electric trains, Lionel LLC, which it sued for stealing its train designs. But it will likely be years, if ever, before the local firm sees any money.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2004
M.T.H. Electric Trains of Columbia was awarded $40.8 million yesterday after a federal jury in Detroit found that Lionel LLC, the world's largest model train maker, and a subcontractor had stolen its designs. M.T.H. sued Michigan-based Lionel LLC and Korea Brass Co. in April 2000, claiming that the more than century-old Lionel sold trains made from designs stolen from a South Korean manufacturer employed by M.T.H. The long-running case sparked an outcry among diehard Lionel model train enthusiasts, who accused M.T.H.
NEWS
November 10, 1997
M. T. H. Electric Trains expanding into new buildingMike Wolf, president of Columbia-based M. T. H. Electric Trains, has announced that the company is expanding its operation into a new building at 7020 Columbia Gateway Drive.M. T. H. specializes in manufacturing and wholesaling electric toy trains.PeopleJohn Roe has been named by Casey & Associates/ONCOR International as a sales and leasing associate with the Columbia office. Roe will specialize in industrial and land leasing and sales, with an emphasis on the Baltimore-Washington corridor market.
NEWS
August 16, 2005
Charles Truitt Smith, a retired computer company executive and avid collector of lead soldiers and vintage electric trains, died of a brain tumor Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The Lutherville resident was 69. Mr. Smith was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. He was a 1954 graduate of the Gilman School and earned a bachelor's degree in business administration in 1958 from the Johns Hopkins University. He began his business career in 1958 as a salesman for National Cash Register and in 1962 took a similar position with International Business Machines.
NEWS
December 18, 2007
Oliver Henry Fulton, a veteran of several technology corporations who later headed the Maryland Industrial Development Financing Authority for more than a decade, died of complications from pneumonia Dec. 9 at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. He was 88 and lived on Gibson Island. Mr. Fulton was born and raised in Pittsburgh. When he was 16, he won a "World's Greatest Toy Contest" sponsored by A.C. Gilbert, the New Haven, Conn., manufacturer of the Erector Set and of American Flyer electric trains.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | October 8, 2009
The beleaguered MARC commuter train system received hopeful news this week as the Maryland Transit Administration welcomed back to its fleet the first of four electric locomotives that have languished in an Amtrak repair yard in Delaware for much of the past three years. Terry Schindler, Amtrak's deputy chief mechanical officer, said the railroad expects to return a second locomotive to the MTA by early next week. He said Amtrak believes it has found a way to repair an electrical problem that had sidelined MARC's 23-year-old fleet of AEM-7 locomotives and hopes to deliver the remaining two to MARC before the end of the year.
NEWS
December 18, 2007
Oliver Henry Fulton, a veteran of several technology corporations who later headed the Maryland Industrial Development Financing Authority for more than a decade, died of complications from pneumonia Dec. 9 at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. He was 88 and lived on Gibson Island. Mr. Fulton was born and raised in Pittsburgh. When he was 16, he won a "World's Greatest Toy Contest" sponsored by A.C. Gilbert, the New Haven, Conn., manufacturer of the Erector Set and of American Flyer electric trains.
BUSINESS
By Tim Jones and Tim Jones,Chicago Tribune | July 25, 2007
Somewhere up in roundhouse heaven, the 19th-century railroad barons who fought ruthlessly for coast-to-coast dominance must be shaking their heads over the great modern day courtroom clash of the toy train titans. The trade-secret fight between Columbia's MTH Electric Trains, formerly known as Mike's Train House Inc., and suburban Detroit model-train icon Lionel LLC, once the world's biggest toy maker but now in bankruptcy, has generated reams of court filings and countless billable hours from lawyers over design drawings for model trains.
NEWS
August 16, 2005
Charles Truitt Smith, a retired computer company executive and avid collector of lead soldiers and vintage electric trains, died of a brain tumor Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The Lutherville resident was 69. Mr. Smith was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. He was a 1954 graduate of the Gilman School and earned a bachelor's degree in business administration in 1958 from the Johns Hopkins University. He began his business career in 1958 as a salesman for National Cash Register and in 1962 took a similar position with International Business Machines.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2004
For model train fans, Christmas is the time to dust off the layout, gather the family around and permit the odoriferous mix of pine needles, lubricating oil and ozone to summon pleasant memories of childhood. But, for model train maker M.T.H. Electric Trains of Columbia, this season is bittersweet. It won a $41 million judgment this year against the venerable granddaddy of electric trains, Lionel LLC, which it sued for stealing its train designs. But it will likely be years, if ever, before the local firm sees any money.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2004
M.T.H. Electric Trains of Columbia was awarded $40.8 million yesterday after a federal jury in Detroit found that Lionel LLC, the world's largest model train maker, and a subcontractor had stolen its designs. M.T.H. sued Michigan-based Lionel LLC and Korea Brass Co. in April 2000, claiming that the more than century-old Lionel sold trains made from designs stolen from a South Korean manufacturer employed by M.T.H. The long-running case sparked an outcry among diehard Lionel model train enthusiasts, who accused M.T.H.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 23, 1993
People who are not versed in the peculiar ways of Baltimore sometimes think a Christmas garden has something to do with a Christmas cactus.Guess again.Baltimore's wonderful gardens that bloom only around Dec. 25 are really the miniature railway villages that fill local fire houses, basements and family rooms.And there is no more traditional Baltimore Christmas aroma than the scent of a balsam fir intermixed with imitation smoke spewing from an O-gauge toy steam locomotive.And what carol is as evocative as the din produced by the wheels and motors of three electric trains hurtling along a figure-eight of track?
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2002
Every holiday season, several trains ride the rails at Ellicott City's B&O Railroad Station Museum. They just happen to be very small. Each winter for at least 14 years, the museum at the United States' oldest railroad station has displayed a model railroad and town, complete with scenery, buildings and people. "This really draws the families," said Lisa Mason-Chaney, the museum director. There is a scale model of the railroad between Baltimore and Ellicott City on permanent display, but the holiday exhibit offers fun touches and a new design each year.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2002
Every holiday season, several trains ride the rails at Ellicott City's B&O Railroad Station Museum. They just happen to be very small. Each winter for at least 14 years, the museum at the United States' oldest railroad station has displayed a model railroad and town, complete with scenery, buildings and people. "This really draws the families," said Lisa Mason-Chaney, the museum director. There is a scale model of the railroad between Baltimore and Ellicott City on permanent display, but the holiday exhibit offers fun touches and a new design each year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Marvel and Bill Marvel,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 6, 2002
Once a year, Grandpa would get out the electric train. He'd lay the track in a circle around the tree, attach the wires and plug in the transformer. Then the train would take off like a jackrabbit, careering around the rails. The crossing gate would bob as the cars rolled by, and if it was a really advanced train set, the engine would whistle, sort of, and smoke would curl back from the stack. But they've been working on the railroad. Model railroads - please don't call them electric trains - have rolled into the age of the microprocessor.
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