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Electric Shock

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By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Charles County authorities are investigating an incident in which a retired Circuit Court judge ordered that a unruly defendant be given an electric shock during a court proceeding last month. Paul B. DeWolfe Jr., who heads the state Office of the Public Defender, called Friday for the judge to be banned from hearing cases. "What the judge did here was unconscionable," DeWolfe said in a statement. "The infliction of physical pain to silence a person is unacceptable anywhere, but especially when it is done in a court of law at the direction of the very person whose job it is to protect people's rights.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2014
A man accused of fatally stabbing his ex-girlfriend in 2013 was unable to attend his own trial in Baltimore County Tuesday after he refused to wear a stun cuff. Jeffrey Matthew Shiflett, 35, charged with murdering Katie Hadel, 33, missed opening statements after Circuit Judge Ruth Ann Jakubowski ordered that he wear an ankle bracelet that can deliver an electric shock. Jakubowski made the order after Shiflett screamed the judge's first name repeatedly and attempted to enter her chambers as he was being escorted to the courtroom before the trial.
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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | January 25, 1994
Q: My wife has been treated for depression in a psychiatric hospital for over a month. She has shown a little sign of improvement on two different drugs for depression.Her psychiatrist has recommended electric shock treatment, but I have been unwilling to consent to such treatment because of the things I have read and heard about its side effects.How do you feel about the benefits and dangers of electric shock treatment?A: The use of electric shock (electroconvulsive treatment or ECT) has been limited by its undeserved poor reputation among the lay public who have the impression that it is dangerous and leads to brain damage.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Charles County authorities are investigating an incident in which a retired Circuit Court judge ordered that a unruly defendant be given an electric shock during a court proceeding last month. Paul B. DeWolfe Jr., who heads the state Office of the Public Defender, called Friday for the judge to be banned from hearing cases. "What the judge did here was unconscionable," DeWolfe said in a statement. "The infliction of physical pain to silence a person is unacceptable anywhere, but especially when it is done in a court of law at the direction of the very person whose job it is to protect people's rights.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 1997
PRAGUE, Czech Republic -- The invisible hand of the market turns out to be no match for the strong arm of a cabbie, prompting the Czech Republic's free-market-worshiping economists to reconsider their year-old deregulation of taxi fares.One enterprising driver, according to reports, managed to charge his hapless passenger 8,500 crowns ($258) for a ride of less than a mile. Another drove up on the sidewalk and tried to run down a couple who complained of having been overcharged.Yet another furiously drove a passenger from his destination back to his point of departure when the passenger protested that the meter was running too fast.
NEWS
October 26, 1995
A photographer was taken to Carroll County General Hospital after he apparently suffered an electric shock from his equipment at the Kmart store in Carrolltown Center in Eldersburg yesterday and fell against a wall.David Wilder, 50, refused treatment at the hospital for injuries suffered when he fell against a wall in the photo studio, a hospital spokeswoman said. The photo lab is a subcontractor of Kmart and Mr. Wilder is not an employee of the store, officials said.No one else was injured and the studio was closed until the cause of the incident could be determined.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | May 6, 1991
Doctors were pursuing a textbook -- albeit, trial-and-error -- approach yesterday to restoring President Bush's normal heart rhythm, the last step of which could be delivering an electric shock to his chest if drugs fail to work, experts said.Shocking the heart is a low-risk procedure that doctors frequently elect to use when patients fail to respond to drug therapy, physicians said. And in most cases, they said, the technique works."In almost everybody like him who is in atrial fibrillation for the first time, [electric shock]
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2014
A man accused of fatally stabbing his ex-girlfriend in 2013 was unable to attend his own trial in Baltimore County Tuesday after he refused to wear a stun cuff. Jeffrey Matthew Shiflett, 35, charged with murdering Katie Hadel, 33, missed opening statements after Circuit Judge Ruth Ann Jakubowski ordered that he wear an ankle bracelet that can deliver an electric shock. Jakubowski made the order after Shiflett screamed the judge's first name repeatedly and attempted to enter her chambers as he was being escorted to the courtroom before the trial.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2000
The last thing Jack Hubberman, 71, remembers is bending over to grab his luggage at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. His heart stopped. He collapsed. His wife, Jackie, screamed for help. US Airways flight attendant Judy Smith rushed over to help. When she learned that Hubberman had heart problems, she called for an automatic exterior defibrillator, tore open Hubberman's shirt and attached the machine's electrodes to his chest. She saved his life. "If they didn't have [the defibrillator]
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2011
The young theater ensembles around town haven't cornered the market on the edgy or the avant-garde. The Vagabond Players , more readily associated with mainstream (or at least near-mainstream) repertoire, is closing its 95th season with a decidedly offbeat item, "Abducting Diana," by Italian playwright Dario Fo, the 1997 Nobel Prize laureate for literature. It's a gutsy choice for the company, but the play, a combination of satire, farce and a dash of commedia dell'arte, seems to suffer in the translation.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
At one point Saturday, City Hospital in Martinsburg, W.Va., was so overwhelmed with patients injured on the Tough Mudder obstacle course that it had to turn people away from its emergency room. Two people who participated in the race in nearby Gerrardstown, W.Va., suffered heart attacks, according to Teresa McCabe of West Virginia University Hospitals-East, which runs City Hospital. Ten people had hypothermia, orthopedic injuries or head injuries. And two people were treated for drowning, including Avishek Sengupta, a 28-year-old Ellicott City man who died Sunday.
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | June 9, 2011
The wind split one of our cherry trees in two, and since it was unlikely that the tree would survive, I cut it down and added it to a firewood pile, after I spent the better part of a morning getting our gasoline-powered chain saw to start and operate without stalling. There had to be a better way to saw trees and limbs, I thought. Then it occurred to me. Maybe I should try using an electric chain saw, because even though I was once dissatisfied with their power, it's been decades since I've used one, and saws have improved with time since they were first created by Perdix.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2011
The young theater ensembles around town haven't cornered the market on the edgy or the avant-garde. The Vagabond Players , more readily associated with mainstream (or at least near-mainstream) repertoire, is closing its 95th season with a decidedly offbeat item, "Abducting Diana," by Italian playwright Dario Fo, the 1997 Nobel Prize laureate for literature. It's a gutsy choice for the company, but the play, a combination of satire, farce and a dash of commedia dell'arte, seems to suffer in the translation.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
When Ellen Handler Spitz was 8 years old, her mother arranged for her visually attuned daughter to spend each Saturday in the studio of a local female sculptor. Though the child had access to modeling clay and tools, the sculptor left her alone. Side by side, each worked on her own projects. "I was allowed and even, as I realize now, expected to become completely absorbed in my work," Spitz writes in her new book, The Brightening Glance. When her mother arrived to pick her up at the end of each session, "her sudden appearance felt like an electric shock ... which I experienced rather like awakening from a daydream, when you cannot believe time has actually elapsed."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2005
Raymond Louis Walston, who lost his heart to the Big Top as a child growing up in East Baltimore and spent the rest of his life as a magician and clown bringing smiles and laughs to children of all ages, died of lung cancer June 4 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 81 and had lived in Essex and earlier in Fort Howard. Mr. Walston, who was born in Baltimore and raised on North Potomac Street, was a graduate of Patterson Park High School. He served with the 80th Infantry in Europe during World War II, where he attained the rank of sergeant and was decorated with a Purple Heart.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 20, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Sometime during his imprisonment, maybe when he was hung naked with his arms tied behind him and guards were beating him, Salah Abdul-Kareem was as good as dead. This is known only because he is alive. He speaks softly, slowly, nervously. When he reaches for the most painful memories, his hands tremble as if a residual shock is passing through them. Sometimes when he talks he looks intently at a spot only he can see, as if viewing a film clip of the memory he is relaying.
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | June 9, 2011
The wind split one of our cherry trees in two, and since it was unlikely that the tree would survive, I cut it down and added it to a firewood pile, after I spent the better part of a morning getting our gasoline-powered chain saw to start and operate without stalling. There had to be a better way to saw trees and limbs, I thought. Then it occurred to me. Maybe I should try using an electric chain saw, because even though I was once dissatisfied with their power, it's been decades since I've used one, and saws have improved with time since they were first created by Perdix.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2000
The last thing Jack Hubberman, 71, remembers is bending over to grab his luggage at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. His heart stopped. He collapsed. His wife, Jackie, screamed for help. US Airways flight attendant Judy Smith rushed over to help. When she learned that Hubberman had heart problems she called for an automatic exterior defibrillator, tore open Hubberman's shirt and attached the machine's electrodes to his chest. She saved his life. "If they didn't have [the defibrillator]
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2000
The last thing Jack Hubberman, 71, remembers is bending over to grab his luggage at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. His heart stopped. He collapsed. His wife, Jackie, screamed for help. US Airways flight attendant Judy Smith rushed over to help. When she learned that Hubberman had heart problems she called for an automatic exterior defibrillator, tore open Hubberman's shirt and attached the machine's electrodes to his chest. She saved his life. "If they didn't have [the defibrillator]
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2000
The last thing Jack Hubberman, 71, remembers is bending over to grab his luggage at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. His heart stopped. He collapsed. His wife, Jackie, screamed for help. US Airways flight attendant Judy Smith rushed over to help. When she learned that Hubberman had heart problems, she called for an automatic exterior defibrillator, tore open Hubberman's shirt and attached the machine's electrodes to his chest. She saved his life. "If they didn't have [the defibrillator]
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