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By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1998
The state agency responsible for protecting residential customers' utility rights claims that Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. has been overcharging consumers and has asked regulators to cut electric rates by $110 million.The Office of People's Counsel's action marks the first time in at least five years that the agency has challenged BGE's rates. If successful, the rate decrease would trim a few dollars a month off the average residential electric bill."Our analysis shows that BGE's electric rates are too high and that BGE has been earning more than it should for many months," said Michael J. Travieso, head of the Office of People's Counsel (OPC)
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NEWS
July 17, 2014
On July 2, for the fourth consecutive year, Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. asked the Public Service Commission to approve a rate distribution increase for citizens, who receive both gas and electric service. For each of the past three years, BGE has gotten an increase in the rate distribution charge, which has added $6.80 a month to the average electric bill and $4.28 to the average gas bill. If the PSC allows this fourth increase, additional monthly charges will amount to an average of $6.57 on electric bills and $8.53 on gas bills.
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NEWS
April 4, 1999
STATE lawmakers deserve credit for passing a farsighted deregulation bill that will allow Marylanders -- businesses and homeowners -- to choose their own electric-power provider. The competitive nature of a free-market economy tends to drive prices down. There's every reason to believe it will happen with electric prices, too.Gov. Parris N. Glendening opposed this bill, threatening a veto if he didn't get environmental and consumer concessions. He wisely reversed course Friday. This measure, which is both thoughtful and cautious, puts Maryland in line with nearby states that are deregulating electric power.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
Gubernatorial hopeful Del. Heather Mizeur has made lowering electricity bills one of her goals if elected governor. In a policy paper released Tuesday, Mizeur called for greater oversight of Maryland utility companies and more investments in the aging electric grid, two moves she said would help curb power failures and lower energy bills. The Democrat from Takoma Park said she would appoint more consumer advocates to the Public Service Commission, which regulates utility companies, and that she would require energy companies to renegotiate their licenses every 10 to 15 years.  Those negotiations, she said, would promote competition and potentially open the door to ending what she called "indefinite, perpetual franchises to several power utilities.
NEWS
By E. J. Pipkin and Jim Rosapepe | September 23, 2008
There's no question that Warren E. Buffett's proposed purchase of Constellation Energy Group for $4.7 billion - together with the additional $1 billion investment by Mr. Buffett - is good for the management of Constellation. It's good for Mr. Buffett, too. However, it's not a good deal for Maryland. According to Constellation's second-quarter SEC filing, its local distribution company, Baltimore Gas and Electric, was worth about 20 percent of the whole company. Therefore, the rest of the company can be bought for less than $4 billion.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2006
Legislation aimed at lowering electric rates for 1.1 million Maryland consumers starting next year may face a court challenge if the proposed merger by Constellation Energy Group and a Florida utility owner falls apart amid regulatory delays, legal experts say. Constellation, the corporate parent of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., in a recent regulatory filing questioned the legality of a state law forcing the utility to forgo $386 million in fees it...
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun Staff | March 18, 2007
Paula M. Carmody recently stepped into the role of people's counsel at what may prove a watershed moment for Maryland's residential utility customers. The state's Public Service Commission is in the midst of a sweeping review of electric deregulation rules that critics contend contributed to a 72 percent rate hike for customers of Baltimore Gas & Electric last year. As the state's chief advocate for utility customers, the new people's counsel is charged with pressing the commission to adopt changes that will take the sting out of future utility bills.
NEWS
May 22, 1991
The Maryland Public Service Commission today granted the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. a $123.7 million increase in its electric rates.The PSC also ordered a $58 million reduction in the company's fuel cost adjustment rate, leaving consumers a net increase of almost $66 million, or 3.7 percent. Both actions had received preliminary approval by the PSC last December.See story, Page B1.
BUSINESS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
Moody's Investors Service downgraded the credit rating of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. yesterday in response to concerns about the Maryland legislature's recent actions to soften the blow of a 72 percent rate increase and fire the state's five-member utility commission. This is the second time this year the major credit ratings agency has downgraded BGE's debt in response to the political furor over rising electric rates. The reaction by Wall Street will likely have the effect of raising electric rates even further by forcing BGE to pay more to borrow money - an expense that is typically passed on to consumers.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2011
Electric rates may be 8 percent lower this winter than last, but an unusually cold December has likely erased those savings and will deliver unexpectedly high heating bills this month, utility officials said. BGE said Friday that Central Maryland shivered at or below freezing for 458 hours in November and December. That was almost 43 percent more than for same period in 2009. December 2010 was the 8 t h coldest since 1950. Heating degree days for Baltimore ran 16 percent above average.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Aiming to boost the fledgling market for plug-in vehicles, Maryland and seven other states pledged Thursday to use their governments' tax and spending powers to get 3.3 million "zero-emission" cars, trucks and vans on the road in the next dozen years. Gov. Martin O'Malley and his counterparts in California, Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts, Oregon, Rhode Island and Vermont formally vowed to promote plug-in or hydrogen fuel cell vehicles in their states. They signed an agreement promising to take steps in their states to expand consumer demand for the vehicles, which despite rapidly rising sales remain a tiny portion of the cars and trucks sold in the United States.
NEWS
RECORD STAFF REPORT | September 12, 2013
The Maryland Public Service Commission has authorized Delmarva Power to increase electric delivery rates by nearly 4 percent, the utility announced Wednesday. The increase for Delmarva's Maryland customers is effective for electric service rendered on and after Sept. 15. According to the company's website, Delmarva has 5,342 residential and business customers in northeastern Harford County and 45,007 customers in Cecil County, among 195,000 customers in Maryland. The rate increase will add 3.6 percent to monthly residential bills, the company said in a news release posted on its website.
NEWS
August 10, 2013
Baltimore Gas and Electric Company has recently requested a monthly surcharge on gas customers to cover part of the cost of replacing old pipes ( "BGE asks for monthly gas-bill surcharge," Aug. 2). This in addition to a prior BGE filing in May for a rate increase and electric surcharge to accelerate work on its electrical infrastructure. That rate increase application quickly followed the previous increase granted in February. While the merits of the pending rate proposals will be considered before the Public Service Commission, BGE customers who have not yet selected an alternate retail supplier can counter the impact of these increases and significantly reduce their utility bills by choosing a competitive retail supplier that offers lower rates than BGE's Standard Offer Service.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
Say this for Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., they have a curious sense of timing. Six years ago, they sought a 72 percent rate increase at the same time that their parent company was seeking approval for a merger - and in the middle of a gubernatorial election. That didn't go so well. Now the company is seeking a rate increase - albeit a much more modest one - just after hundreds of thousands of its customers were without power, some of them for more than a week, raising the ire of residents and politicians alike.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2011
Customers who purchase electric power from Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. will pay about 11 percent less starting in June. The average customer now pays about $146 a month, according to BGE spokeswoman Linda A. Foy. Now that BGE has locked in the final segment of its electricity supply contracts and the purchases have been approved by state regulators, the utility has confirmed estimates made last year that bills would decrease by about $16 a month....
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2011
Electric rates may be 8 percent lower this winter than last, but an unusually cold December has likely erased those savings and will deliver unexpectedly high heating bills this month, utility officials said. BGE said Friday that Central Maryland shivered at or below freezing for 458 hours in November and December. That was almost 43 percent more than for same period in 2009. December 2010 was the 8 t h coldest since 1950. Heating degree days for Baltimore ran 16 percent above average.
NEWS
August 15, 2000
THE BRAVE New World of energy deregulation is a terribly uncertain one. California consumers are suffering under a double whammy of power shortages and soaring rates, leading to rolling blackouts and elected leaders calling for a rate-payer rebellion. In Central Maryland, consumers will finally see lower electric rates, after a month's court delay, amid warnings that it may be a ploy to discourage true energy supply competition. A dozen states have deregulated electric companies in efforts to cut consumer bills.
NEWS
November 13, 1999
ITS A win-win situation. Baltimore-area homeowners get a guaranteed reduction in their electric bills for six years and Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. gets partial compensation for the power plants it has built.Welcome to the world of deregulated energy markets, in which every local utility user will be free to pick his or her own power company next July.For those who stay with the old monopoly utility, BGE, theres a 6.5 percent rate cut -- an average of $66 a year -- that will remain in effect until 2006.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customers will likely save an average of $192 a year on electricity starting next summer, as falling energy prices push rates to their lowest point since a spike that stoked outrage several years ago. BGE, which plans to officially announce the figures Friday, has locked in most of its supply for the 12-month period beginning next June. It estimates that typical residential consumers will pay $16 less per month on average than they're shelling out for the current year, and $28 less a month than they did when rates peaked two years ago. Consumers are benefiting from a global downdrift in energy prices.
NEWS
By E. J. Pipkin and Jim Rosapepe | September 23, 2008
There's no question that Warren E. Buffett's proposed purchase of Constellation Energy Group for $4.7 billion - together with the additional $1 billion investment by Mr. Buffett - is good for the management of Constellation. It's good for Mr. Buffett, too. However, it's not a good deal for Maryland. According to Constellation's second-quarter SEC filing, its local distribution company, Baltimore Gas and Electric, was worth about 20 percent of the whole company. Therefore, the rest of the company can be bought for less than $4 billion.
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