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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | October 17, 2009
Amtrak has finished overhauling and has returned to MARC the second of four AEM-7 electric locomotives that had been out of service for more than two years, bolstering the commuter rail system's ability to haul long trains and reduce crowding. Maryland Department of Transportation spokesman Jack Cahalan said the newly returned locomotive performed well on the first of a series of tests in which it hauled a train equipped with a backup locomotive - the first of the AEM-7s returned by Amtrak.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | October 17, 2009
Amtrak has finished overhauling and has returned to MARC the second of four AEM-7 electric locomotives that had been out of service for more than two years, bolstering the commuter rail system's ability to haul long trains and reduce crowding. Maryland Department of Transportation spokesman Jack Cahalan said the newly returned locomotive performed well on the first of a series of tests in which it hauled a train equipped with a backup locomotive - the first of the AEM-7s returned by Amtrak.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | October 8, 2009
The beleaguered MARC commuter train system received hopeful news this week as the Maryland Transit Administration welcomed back to its fleet the first of four electric locomotives that have languished in an Amtrak repair yard in Delaware for much of the past three years. Terry Schindler, Amtrak's deputy chief mechanical officer, said the railroad expects to return a second locomotive to the MTA by early next week. He said Amtrak believes it has found a way to repair an electrical problem that had sidelined MARC's 23-year-old fleet of AEM-7 locomotives and hopes to deliver the remaining two to MARC before the end of the year.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | October 8, 2009
The beleaguered MARC commuter train system received hopeful news this week as the Maryland Transit Administration welcomed back to its fleet the first of four electric locomotives that have languished in an Amtrak repair yard in Delaware for much of the past three years. Terry Schindler, Amtrak's deputy chief mechanical officer, said the railroad expects to return a second locomotive to the MTA by early next week. He said Amtrak believes it has found a way to repair an electrical problem that had sidelined MARC's 23-year-old fleet of AEM-7 locomotives and hopes to deliver the remaining two to MARC before the end of the year.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Amtrak crews' failure to connect a train's air brake system properly -- and then to test the brakes adequately -- caused an April 1991 collision with a Conrail freight train in Chase, the National Transportation Safety Board said yesterday.The board blamed "Amtrak's failure to provide adequate training and oversight" as a contributing cause of the accident.Two Amtrak crewmen were hurt when they jumped from the northbound string of four locomotives just before the train slammed into the middle of a 121-car Conrail coal train that was switching tracks south of the Gunpowder River bridge in northeast Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Doug Birch | April 14, 1991
Evidence that Amtrak workers failed to connect properly th air brakes of four locomotives that crashed into a Conrail freight train near Chase on Friday turned the investigation yesterday to Amtrak's rail yard near Washington's Union Station.Alan Pollock, of the National Transportation Safety Board, said investigators will begin questioning this week the workers at Washington's Ivy City Yards who prepared the train -- a diesel locomotive hauling three idle electric engines -- for the trip to Philadelphia for maintenance.
NEWS
By Doug Birch | April 17, 1991
An Amtrak spokesman confirmed yesterday that tests on urine samples provided by the crews of both trains that collided Friday near Chase produced no evidence of alcohol or drug abuse.Spokesmen for both Amtrak and Conrail also said that as far as their organizations were concerned, the four Conrail crewmen who were operating the 125-car coal train when it was struck in the middle by a string of four Amtrak locomotives at 3:09 a.m. Friday had been cleared of any culpability in the accident.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | September 17, 2009
Delays, cancellations and crowding are a way of life aboard Maryland's MARC Penn Line, but crowding has been worse than usual the past three weeks as the Maryland Transit Administration has struggled to round up enough locomotives to pull its trains. The main problem is that six of MARC's 10 electric locomotives are out of commission - forcing the use of less powerful diesel engines that can pull fewer rail cars, said MTA spokeswoman Jawauna Greene. The underlying issue: MARC's entire locomotive fleet is decades old. Crowding aside, MARC's locomotive troubles have not caused any additional commuter train delays or cancellations, Greene says.
NEWS
By Doug Birch | April 19, 1991
Amtrak has suspended without pay two maintenance employees who were assigned to connect the air brakes on a string of four locomotives that slammed broadside into a Conrail coal train near Chase last week, the passenger rail agency said yesterday.National Transportation Safety Board investigators have said the brake systems on the Amtrak locomotives -- a diesel towing three non-operating electric locomotives from Washington to Philadelphia -- were not properly connected before the crash.The April 12 accident, which injured two Amtrak crewmen, occurred about 100 yards from the site four years ago of the worst train wreck in Amtrak's history.
NEWS
By Doug Birch | April 13, 1991
Amtrak workers apparently failed to properly hook up the brakes on the string of four locomotives that crashed into a Conrail freight train in eastern Baltimore County yesterday morning, the chief federal investigator said last night.Jim Burnett, a member of the National Transportation Safety Board who is leading the investigation of the crash, said that only the brakes on the lead, diesel locomotive were working.Someone apparently failed to properly connect the diesel's air compression brake system to that of three electric locomotives it was towing, he said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | September 17, 2009
Delays, cancellations and crowding are a way of life aboard Maryland's MARC Penn Line, but crowding has been worse than usual the past three weeks as the Maryland Transit Administration has struggled to round up enough locomotives to pull its trains. The main problem is that six of MARC's 10 electric locomotives are out of commission - forcing the use of less powerful diesel engines that can pull fewer rail cars, said MTA spokeswoman Jawauna Greene. The underlying issue: MARC's entire locomotive fleet is decades old. Crowding aside, MARC's locomotive troubles have not caused any additional commuter train delays or cancellations, Greene says.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Amtrak crews' failure to connect a train's air brake system properly -- and then to test the brakes adequately -- caused an April 1991 collision with a Conrail freight train in Chase, the National Transportation Safety Board said yesterday.The board blamed "Amtrak's failure to provide adequate training and oversight" as a contributing cause of the accident.Two Amtrak crewmen were hurt when they jumped from the northbound string of four locomotives just before the train slammed into the middle of a 121-car Conrail coal train that was switching tracks south of the Gunpowder River bridge in northeast Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Doug Birch | April 19, 1991
Amtrak has suspended without pay two maintenance employees who were assigned to connect the air brakes on a string of four locomotives that slammed broadside into a Conrail coal train near Chase last week, the passenger rail agency said yesterday.National Transportation Safety Board investigators have said the brake systems on the Amtrak locomotives -- a diesel towing three non-operating electric locomotives from Washington to Philadelphia -- were not properly connected before the crash.The April 12 accident, which injured two Amtrak crewmen, occurred about 100 yards from the site four years ago of the worst train wreck in Amtrak's history.
NEWS
By Doug Birch | April 17, 1991
An Amtrak spokesman confirmed yesterday that tests on urine samples provided by the crews of both trains that collided Friday near Chase produced no evidence of alcohol or drug abuse.Spokesmen for both Amtrak and Conrail also said that as far as their organizations were concerned, the four Conrail crewmen who were operating the 125-car coal train when it was struck in the middle by a string of four Amtrak locomotives at 3:09 a.m. Friday had been cleared of any culpability in the accident.
NEWS
By Doug Birch | April 14, 1991
Evidence that Amtrak workers failed to connect properly th air brakes of four locomotives that crashed into a Conrail freight train near Chase on Friday turned the investigation yesterday to Amtrak's rail yard near Washington's Union Station.Alan Pollock, of the National Transportation Safety Board, said investigators will begin questioning this week the workers at Washington's Ivy City Yards who prepared the train -- a diesel locomotive hauling three idle electric engines -- for the trip to Philadelphia for maintenance.
NEWS
By Doug Birch | April 13, 1991
Amtrak workers apparently failed to properly hook up the brakes on the string of four locomotives that crashed into a Conrail freight train in eastern Baltimore County yesterday morning, the chief federal investigator said last night.Jim Burnett, a member of the National Transportation Safety Board who is leading the investigation of the crash, said that only the brakes on the lead, diesel locomotive were working.Someone apparently failed to properly connect the diesel's air compression brake system to that of three electric locomotives it was towing, he said.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Earlier this month, three MARC locomotives failed in a single 90-degree day, turning a routine commute into an ordeal of up to three hours for more than 1,000 passengers. It was an ominous foreshadowing of what could lie ahead in July and August, the cruelest months in MARC's calendar. As any veteran MARC passenger knows, July and August are typically the months of greatest torment for the commuter rail service. It is in the summer, when soaring temperatures take a toll on both tracks and trains, that the system is most vulnerable to service meltdowns.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Staff | October 4, 1999
William Burnett Kenney, a former Penn-Central Railroad locomotive engineer, died of heart failure Wednesday at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. He was 86.After living in Pimlico for 48 years, he moved to Parkville in 1968 and to Oak Crest Village in 1997.The son of a Pennsylvania Railroad conductor, he was reared in Gardenville and graduated from Baltimore City College before following in his father's footsteps and becoming a Pennsy locomotive fireman in 1942. He was promoted to engineer in 1946 and retired in 1975.
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