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By Mike Giuliano | January 9, 2014
The Columbia Orchestra gets to do a lot of big pieces during the season, but it also has a free chamber music concert series that puts the focus on smaller pieces. Its next chamber concert is on Sunday, Jan. 19, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. Orchestral performers really appreciate such opportunities to explore the chamber music repertory. The upcoming concert features the Columbia Orchestra Piano Trio, composed of music director Jason Love on cello, concertmaster Brenda Anna on violin and Nancy Smith on piano.
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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | January 9, 2014
The Columbia Orchestra gets to do a lot of big pieces during the season, but it also has a free chamber music concert series that puts the focus on smaller pieces. Its next chamber concert is on Sunday, Jan. 19, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. Orchestral performers really appreciate such opportunities to explore the chamber music repertory. The upcoming concert features the Columbia Orchestra Piano Trio, composed of music director Jason Love on cello, concertmaster Brenda Anna on violin and Nancy Smith on piano.
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FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Les Paul's innovations changed our sonic universe, but at this moment in Baird Auditorium he wants to talk about the time this kid walked up to the stage in Tulsa, Okla., and asked to play his guitar."I handed him the guitar and he played it and he was just great," says Paul, pausing before dropping his bomb. "It was Charlie Christian."Charlie Christian! The story is perfect. Les Paul, who practically invented the solid body electric guitar, meets Charlie Christian, who is just a kid then but will grow up to be the electric guitar's first hero.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | October 11, 2008
Slash leaps at chance to honor Les Paul - no strings attached Not wanting to miss a chance to pay tribute to Les Paul, his guitar hero, former Guns N' Roses guitarist Slash signed up to play at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's tribute concert Nov. 15 without even hearing who he'd be playing with on stage. "I'm just coming with my guitar," Slash said. The lineup for the concert at Cleveland's State Theater includes Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top and Richie Sambora of Bon Jovi. Slash, a member of Velvet Revolver, said he'd do anything for the 93-year-old Paul, known as the "Father of the Electric Guitar."
FEATURES
June 23, 1998
Play it LOUDWhether it's rock 'n' roll, jazz or the blues, there's no mistaking the brash sounds of the electric guitar. Thanks to the Lemelson Center's Rise of the Electric Guitar Web site, you'll be able to meet the makers and players of this musical breakthrough at http://www.si.edu/organiza/museums/nmah/ lemel/guitars/.You'll discover how the guitar was invented and how famous makers, from Gibson to Rickenbacker, influenced its design. For those new to the guitar, audio clips demonstrate how the instrument works.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 11, 1998
Superstar vehicles rarely have room for more than one star. Whether it's "An Evening with Elton John" or the latest Madonna extravaganza, the focus is always on the star, no matter how many other bodies happen to be onstage.But Janet Jackson's "Velvet Rope" concert, which opened its U.S. tour before a capacity crowd of 15,069 at Washington's MCI Center on Thursday, was an ensemble act from start to finish.Make no mistake: Jackson was clearly the star. Frenzied fans shrieked, "I love you, Janet!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | May 3, 2007
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Burke Sampson, electric guitar; Nick Sjostrom, electric bass; E.J. Shaul-Thompson, drums; Caleb Stine, acoustic guitar and vocals; Andy Stack, upright bass; Jenn Wasner, vocals. Founded in --2005 Style --indie folk rock Influenced by --Hank Williams Sr., Townes Van Zandt, the Carter family, Graham Parsons Notable --The group recently recorded a pair of songs for a short EP called Come Back Home. One is "Flame in My Heart," a George Jones cover, and the other is an original.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | October 11, 2008
Slash leaps at chance to honor Les Paul - no strings attached Not wanting to miss a chance to pay tribute to Les Paul, his guitar hero, former Guns N' Roses guitarist Slash signed up to play at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's tribute concert Nov. 15 without even hearing who he'd be playing with on stage. "I'm just coming with my guitar," Slash said. The lineup for the concert at Cleveland's State Theater includes Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top and Richie Sambora of Bon Jovi. Slash, a member of Velvet Revolver, said he'd do anything for the 93-year-old Paul, known as the "Father of the Electric Guitar."
FEATURES
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 29, 2005
The black, red and white stage set accented with 11 chalk-white potted palm fronds may have been elaborate, but the music was unrelentingly straight forward. At Merriweather Post Pavilion on Tuesday night, the White Stripes, the powerful duo of Meg and Jack White, delivered a show crammed with musical thrills. Rock bands with three times the members and more spectacular backdrops seldom perform with such uncut, visceral energy. The show, which stretched for about 90 minutes, kicked off with a high-octane version of "Blue Orchid," the stellar first single from the Stripes' latest album, the brilliantly weird Get Behind Me Satan.
FEATURES
By Evening Sun Staff | March 18, 1991
JIM TAYLOR stands at the workbench in the small shop behind his house. He's putting the finishing touches on an electric guitar he built from leftover parts, and he's expecting the buyer to arrive soon to pick it up.As he works on the instrument, it's easy to see Jim Taylor is enjoying what he calls a "laid-back thing, not too many hassles any more."Taylor has his own business. He builds, repairs and restores stringed musical instruments -- guitars, banjos, mandolins and violins.Five years ago, he was a quality control supervisor at the Black & Decker Manufacturing Co. plant in Hampstead, Carroll County, where he had worked for 32 years.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,Special to The Sun | August 22, 2007
Annapolis guitar maker John Ingram was dozing in front of the TV one night when he was startled by music as familiar as his own voice. On the screen was guitarist Scott Patton, performing with the country/pop band Sugarland. And the sound that Ingram knew so intimately was coming from Patton's electric guitar , custom designed and built by Ingram and his creative partner, Eric Johnson of Bowie. While Ingram hadn't expected to see Sugarland on television that evening, it wasn't a surprise that Patton was playing the guitar that the partners call the Seneca, named for Seneca Lake in New York state, where Johnson's grandfather had a summer place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | May 3, 2007
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Burke Sampson, electric guitar; Nick Sjostrom, electric bass; E.J. Shaul-Thompson, drums; Caleb Stine, acoustic guitar and vocals; Andy Stack, upright bass; Jenn Wasner, vocals. Founded in --2005 Style --indie folk rock Influenced by --Hank Williams Sr., Townes Van Zandt, the Carter family, Graham Parsons Notable --The group recently recorded a pair of songs for a short EP called Come Back Home. One is "Flame in My Heart," a George Jones cover, and the other is an original.
FEATURES
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 29, 2005
The black, red and white stage set accented with 11 chalk-white potted palm fronds may have been elaborate, but the music was unrelentingly straight forward. At Merriweather Post Pavilion on Tuesday night, the White Stripes, the powerful duo of Meg and Jack White, delivered a show crammed with musical thrills. Rock bands with three times the members and more spectacular backdrops seldom perform with such uncut, visceral energy. The show, which stretched for about 90 minutes, kicked off with a high-octane version of "Blue Orchid," the stellar first single from the Stripes' latest album, the brilliantly weird Get Behind Me Satan.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2005
Ryan McDonough dreams of being America's next guitar god. And he thinks his big break could come next week. The Harford County teen will be one of eight finalists Saturday at Guitarmageddon in Los Angeles, the guitarist's version of American Idol. The tournament began in March with 3,000 contestants competing in Guitar Center stores nationally. The winner gets a new car and a gig as the opening act for Sum 41 - and a dose of invaluable exposure. On a recent afternoon McDonough, 19, gave a demonstration of how he plans to take Guitarmageddon.
NEWS
By PETER JENSEN and PETER JENSEN,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2001
Friends Joanne Armstrong, Jessica Rambo and Margee Cronin have a lot in common. They're all juniors at Notre Dame Preparatory School in Towson. They share the same homeroom, listen to a lot of the same music and watch many of the same TV programs. And one more thing: They all find their parents soooo embarrassing. "My dad doesn't do anything unless he knows it will get a reaction out of me," says Jessica, 16, of Towson. Joanne, a 17-year-old Cockeysville resident, says her parents still show friends a video of her first bath with her father's breathless play-by-play narration.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | July 26, 1998
I GOT A CALL from a guy I know named Carl. It was a cry for help. Carl is a successful man in his 40s, but sometimes even successful people, when they are in need, have to reach out to their friends, and I am proud to consider Carl a friend, even though for my 50th birthday he gave me some kind of reptile egg, which thank God never hatched.It took some effort for Carl to overcome his masculine pride and tell me what was on his mind. It was something that I believe is on the mind of a lot of guys, although they cannot always admit it."
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | July 26, 1998
I GOT A CALL from a guy I know named Carl. It was a cry for help. Carl is a successful man in his 40s, but sometimes even successful people, when they are in need, have to reach out to their friends, and I am proud to consider Carl a friend, even though for my 50th birthday he gave me some kind of reptile egg, which thank God never hatched.It took some effort for Carl to overcome his masculine pride and tell me what was on his mind. It was something that I believe is on the mind of a lot of guys, although they cannot always admit it."
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2005
Ryan McDonough dreams of being America's next guitar god. And he thinks his big break could come next week. The Harford County teen will be one of eight finalists Saturday at Guitarmageddon in Los Angeles, the guitarist's version of American Idol. The tournament began in March with 3,000 contestants competing in Guitar Center stores nationally. The winner gets a new car and a gig as the opening act for Sum 41 - and a dose of invaluable exposure. On a recent afternoon McDonough, 19, gave a demonstration of how he plans to take Guitarmageddon.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 11, 1998
Superstar vehicles rarely have room for more than one star. Whether it's "An Evening with Elton John" or the latest Madonna extravaganza, the focus is always on the star, no matter how many other bodies happen to be onstage.But Janet Jackson's "Velvet Rope" concert, which opened its U.S. tour before a capacity crowd of 15,069 at Washington's MCI Center on Thursday, was an ensemble act from start to finish.Make no mistake: Jackson was clearly the star. Frenzied fans shrieked, "I love you, Janet!"
FEATURES
June 23, 1998
Play it LOUDWhether it's rock 'n' roll, jazz or the blues, there's no mistaking the brash sounds of the electric guitar. Thanks to the Lemelson Center's Rise of the Electric Guitar Web site, you'll be able to meet the makers and players of this musical breakthrough at http://www.si.edu/organiza/museums/nmah/ lemel/guitars/.You'll discover how the guitar was invented and how famous makers, from Gibson to Rickenbacker, influenced its design. For those new to the guitar, audio clips demonstrate how the instrument works.
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