Advertisement
HomeCollectionsElectric Deregulation
IN THE NEWS

Electric Deregulation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 5, 2011
I am a planning analyst at BGE. In Thursday's State of the State Address, Gov. Martin O'Malley said, "There are some challenges so large we can only accomplish them together. Harnessing off-shore wind is one of them. Holding utilities accountable for reliable electric service is another. How long do you want to wait in the cold and dark for a deregulated market to solve these problems?" Deregulation of Maryland's electricity market took place in 1999 under a Democratic governor and Democratic General Assembly, but it did not change the fundamental nature of the electric delivery business (the "wires business")
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 17, 2014
On July 2, for the fourth consecutive year, Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. asked the Public Service Commission to approve a rate distribution increase for citizens, who receive both gas and electric service. For each of the past three years, BGE has gotten an increase in the rate distribution charge, which has added $6.80 a month to the average electric bill and $4.28 to the average gas bill. If the PSC allows this fourth increase, additional monthly charges will amount to an average of $6.57 on electric bills and $8.53 on gas bills.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1998
Nurturing Maryland's exploding high-technology sector will be among the key issues facing the 1998 General Assembly, two top legislative leaders said yesterday in an annual address to members of the Greater Baltimore Committee.Also at the top of the General Assembly's agenda are work force training issues, electric deregulation and reinvesting the state's budget surplus, said House of Delegates Speaker Casper R. Taylor and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller."We need to fine-tune the business climate as we approach the (( 21st century," Taylor told about 100 members of GBC, a private business group.
BUSINESS
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
Maryland energy regulators Thursday ordered the construction of the state's first new natural gas power plant since the state's electric power market was deregulated more than a decade ago. In a decision questioned by other power producers, the Maryland Public Service Commission said it awarded a contract to CPV Maryland LLC to build the new $500 million facility in the Charles County town of Waldorf. The order calls for three of the state's largest publicly regulated power companies, including Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., to buy electricity from the plant.
NEWS
April 13, 1999
MARYLAND'S 188 state legislators can head for home today knowing that they tackled some complex issues during their 90-day gathering.That doesn't usually happen in the first session following statewide elections. Fifteen percent of the senators and 21 percent of the delegates were freshmen unfamiliar with the ways of Annapolis. It took strong, determined leadership by General Assembly veterans to give this session unity.On the biggest issue, electric deregulation, leaders overrode objections from the governor, environmentalists and consumer advocates to approve a bill allowing both residential customers and businesses to pick their electricity suppliers.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1999
DIGHTON, Mass. -- This rural stop to nowhere, with its abandoned industrial yards and ramshackle Colonials, seems blighted. Yet prospects here are actually bright for the first time in years.Thirty miles east, the historic community of Plymouth, with its steady stream of tourists and quaint shops on Main Street, appears to be thriving. Yet some townspeople are restless and worried.Electric deregulation, an issue looming in Maryland, is changing the futures of these two Massachusetts towns.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun Reporter | February 6, 2007
A state senator who pushed last year for the Maryland Public Service Commission to reconsider electric deregulation and to pursue millions of dollars customers paid to BGE's parent company wants the commission to start those inquiries all over again - once Gov. Martin O'Malley appoints a new chairman for the panel. Sen. E.J. Pipkin, an Eastern Shore Republican, was one of the most outspoken critics of electric deregulation last year as lawmakers worked to mitigate BGE's anticipated 72 percent rate increase, and he was one of the first to call for PSC Chairman Kenneth D. Schisler to resign over his handling of the matter.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Bromwell | April 16, 1999
IT'S OFFICIAL: Electric deregulation is coming to Maryland. But this sweeping change is not well understood by many people.Currently, electric utilities are monopolies that generate electricity and deliver it to consumers. Deregulation will allow competition in the marketplace -- companies other than utilities can vie to sell electricity to residential customers, beginning Jan. 1, 2000, and to businesses, beginning Jan. 1, 20001.This has generated many concerns about electric rates, service reliability, environmental impact, etc. The law answers such concerns.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
On July 2, for the fourth consecutive year, Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. asked the Public Service Commission to approve a rate distribution increase for citizens, who receive both gas and electric service. For each of the past three years, BGE has gotten an increase in the rate distribution charge, which has added $6.80 a month to the average electric bill and $4.28 to the average gas bill. If the PSC allows this fourth increase, additional monthly charges will amount to an average of $6.57 on electric bills and $8.53 on gas bills.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | April 7, 1999
PERHAPS the most important bill passed by the Maryland General Assembly this decade made it through the House and Senate over the governor's objections and with plenty of time to spare.Electric deregulation gained approval, by veto-proof margins, a full 10 days before the legislature's mandated April 12 adjournment.It took an impressive display of legislative leadership from House Speaker Casper Taylor and Senate President Mike Miller to educate the rank and file about electric deregulation and insist on passage of a bill.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | October 3, 2011
Last week, a decade after Maryland deregulated electricity by splitting the business of generating power from the business of delivering it to your house, worried regulators took a step backward. They essentially ordered Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and Potomac Electric Power Co. to seek proposals for building a big, new electricity plant — and billing the cost to ratepayers. BGE, Pepco and other delivery companies were supposed to be through with generation plants. They were supposed to supply households, factories and stores with electricity bought from third parties on the unregulated wholesale market.
NEWS
February 12, 2011
In the past week, both Sun columnist Jay Hancock and state Senator James Rosapepe have used a deeply flawed premise to argue for a return to the days when Maryland consumers were captive to a monopoly utility ( "Misleading electric ads make case for reregulation," Feb. 6 and "Deregulation has made electricity less reliable," Feb. 7). Both fail to recognize the harm this would cause to the consumers they seek to protect. Approximately 179,800 residential customers of the state's largest utility are paying less for electricity, thanks largely to the significant savings offered by competitive energy marketers.
NEWS
February 5, 2011
I am a planning analyst at BGE. In Thursday's State of the State Address, Gov. Martin O'Malley said, "There are some challenges so large we can only accomplish them together. Harnessing off-shore wind is one of them. Holding utilities accountable for reliable electric service is another. How long do you want to wait in the cold and dark for a deregulated market to solve these problems?" Deregulation of Maryland's electricity market took place in 1999 under a Democratic governor and Democratic General Assembly, but it did not change the fundamental nature of the electric delivery business (the "wires business")
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN REPORTER | March 12, 2008
A division of Constellation Energy Group said yesterday that it agreed to pay $6.9 million in penalties after admitting to federal regulators that it violated certain rules governing natural gas shipments. The violations were reported to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission by employees of Constellation NewEnergy-Gas, or CNE-G, after a routine audit in early 2007. None of the thousands of transactions in question involved Maryland customers, and the company believes no gas customers in other states were directly harmed by the conduct.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun Reporter | February 6, 2007
A state senator who pushed last year for the Maryland Public Service Commission to reconsider electric deregulation and to pursue millions of dollars customers paid to BGE's parent company wants the commission to start those inquiries all over again - once Gov. Martin O'Malley appoints a new chairman for the panel. Sen. E.J. Pipkin, an Eastern Shore Republican, was one of the most outspoken critics of electric deregulation last year as lawmakers worked to mitigate BGE's anticipated 72 percent rate increase, and he was one of the first to call for PSC Chairman Kenneth D. Schisler to resign over his handling of the matter.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. put his Republican stamp on the commission that regulates and sets rates for the state's public utilities yesterday, appointing a veteran of Annapolis' minority party as chairman of the Maryland Public Service Commission. Del. Kenneth D. Schisler, 33, an Eastern Shore Republican who is minority whip in the House of Delegates, will resign from elected office to take a five-year appointment to the $114,400-a-year post. As chairman of the five-member commission, he will run meetings and set the agenda for a regulatory body that is expected to preside over the continuing and thorny deregulation of the power and telecommunications industries.
NEWS
July 19, 2000
HAS the Maryland Court of Appeals decided to become the expert adjudicators of electric-power issues? That's possible, based on its precedent-setting decision to stop electric deregulation in the Baltimore area, pending a hearing tomorrow. Yet the state's highest court is ill-equipped to make the judgments sought by a New Jersey trade group that wants to overturn the 1999 deregulation order of the state Public Service Commission. The PSC spent an arduous 30 months hammering out a plan.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1998
If there truly is strength in numbers, as the adage goes, then Maryland residential and small business consumers will save money on their future electricity bills primarily by banding together, industry experts told a conference yesterday.As the largely monopolistic utility supply system unravels amid state and federal laws to promote deregulation, small power users should form consortiums through municipalities, churches, homeowners and business associations, and other affiliations, and "aggregate" to save money.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2002
Two key legislators said yesterday that they are willing to review electricity deregulation in Maryland, but disputed a report by the Office of the People's Counsel that said deregulation has failed to produce competition and could put residential customers at risk of higher power prices. The two called the report "premature" and rejected any suggestion that deregulation be suspended. Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell, an architect of Maryland's deregulation law, blasted People's Counsel Michael J. Travieso for criticizing Maryland's deregulation plan and failing to share the report's findings with legislators before releasing it on Wednesday.
NEWS
November 3, 2000
SKEPTICS of electric power deregulation should look at the new rates negotiated by Baltimore area agencies. They'll save 447 local government accounts an estimated $1.3 million in utility costs over the next 16 months. The deal was negotiated by Baltimore City with First Energy Services Corp. of Ohio on behalf of members of the Baltimore Metropolitan Council. It's the first significant group purchase of power since deregulation took effect in Maryland in July, demonstrating that competitive bidding can cut electricity costs for collective buyers.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.