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NEWS
By Carrie Madren | December 6, 2010
Imagine making fewer — or zero — stops at the gas station. Instead, you simply drive home and plug your car into your house to charge up overnight. On top of that, your car emits no air pollution. Within the next decade, such fueling ease could be commonplace. New technology is just breaking into our markets and communities: plug-in electric vehicles. Currently, drivers have two plug-in choices: plug-in hybrids with small gasoline engines to assist the battery, and fully electric vehicles.
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NEWS
By Brian Melton | May 29, 2014
The brand-new, all-electric BMW i3 just got here, and it's already driving away with awards, winning two categories at the 2014 World Car of the Year Awards (World Green Car and World Car Design) and two categories in the first U.K. Car of the Year Awards (Car of the Year and Best Supermini). Light but powerful engine All the hoopla is because of the i3's revolutionary use of aluminum/carbon fiber construction to keep the weight down (2,900 pounds) and the range up: 80-100 miles on a single three-hour charge.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
Employees at General Motors' plant in White Marsh have an unusual workplace benefit. Anyone who drives an electric car can plug it in to charge while they work. At the plant, which produces transmissions and electric motors, workers can park their electric vehicles — or EVs — in any of eight spaces under two solar-powered canopies in the employee lot. "You encourage the use of EVs and give employees some benefit," said William Tiger, plant manager for General Motors Baltimore Operations.
NEWS
By Pat van den Beemt | October 11, 2013
While plenty of Hereford High School teams have won county or state championships over the years, it took a group of engineering students to bring national recognition to the school. Five students - four seniors and one junior - won the National Electric Car Challenge in Irvine, Ca. on Oct. 6. McKenzie Clark, Chris Paton, Joshua Perry, Nick Pindale and Maddie Westwater built the electric car last spring, using parts from several kits. They faced five other high schools in the national competition.
NEWS
By Pat van den Beemt | October 11, 2013
While plenty of Hereford High School teams have won county or state championships over the years, it took a group of engineering students to bring national recognition to the school. Five students - four seniors and one junior - won the National Electric Car Challenge in Irvine, Ca. on Oct. 6. McKenzie Clark, Chris Paton, Joshua Perry, Nick Pindale and Maddie Westwater built the electric car last spring, using parts from several kits. They faced five other high schools in the national competition.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
State energy officials and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will unveil a pair of electric vehicle charging stations outside City Hall on Friday, the first on a city public street, officials said. The stations were installed at the corner of Lexington and Gay streets on the War Memorial Plaza. A ceremony to open the stations for use will take place at 11 a.m. General Motors is providing a Chevy Spark vehicle to demonstrate the charging. The stations aren't the first ones available to the public in the city.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 8, 1992
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp. said yesterday that it was reviewing its electric-car development program to determine whether to push ahead with commercial production during the next few years.The GM statement, issued by a spokesman with little elaboration, suggested that the No. 1 automaker, pressed by huge financial losses, could either delay or scale back the project, or seek a partner to help bear the costs.GM would not say whether the subject had been scheduled for discussion at the company's board meeting, which was held yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Adam Bryant and Adam Bryant,New York Times News Service | August 27, 1991
DETROIT -- Nissan Motor Corp. said yesterday that it had developed an electric car that can be fully recharged in 15 minutes, a significant improvement over electric car batteries announced to date.But industry experts say the Japanese automaker's latest entry in the race to develop electric cars faces numerous technical hurdles before the battery in the vehicle could be sold widely.Nissan's FEV, or Future Electric Vehicle, would be powered by a nickel-cadmium battery that could be 40 percent recharged in six minutes, but recharging would require a special, high-energy power source, not a normal electric outlet.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | April 20, 1993
Maryland's role in the development of an electric car received a push from the General Assembly's approval of $1.25 million in funding to help state defense contractors convert to commercial markets.In addition to pumping $500,000 into a program to develop an electric car, the state budget includes $500,000 for the development of a computerized police car and $250,000 to help leverage federal money used to assist defense contractors in converting to commercial markets.The $250,000 was only a fourth of the $1 million requested by Gov. William Donald Schaefer to help defense contractors cope with a sharply declining military budget.
NEWS
March 4, 2011
Electric car history: 1900: First electric wagon built in Baltimore by the Schaum Automobile and Manufacturing Co. 1906: Baltimore Bargain House, a dry-goods wholesaler, bought an electric truck, the first of its kind used for heavy hauling in the city. It could carry 10,000 pounds with a top speed of 5 mph, and could go 40 miles before needing to be recharged. 1911: Baltimore Gas & Electric Co.'s predecessor bought 10 electric wagons for its use and became a vendor and servicer of electric vehicles.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
State energy officials and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will unveil a pair of electric vehicle charging stations outside City Hall on Friday, the first on a city public street, officials said. The stations were installed at the corner of Lexington and Gay streets on the War Memorial Plaza. A ceremony to open the stations for use will take place at 11 a.m. General Motors is providing a Chevy Spark vehicle to demonstrate the charging. The stations aren't the first ones available to the public in the city.
NEWS
February 22, 2013
In an article about how some employers allow their employees to charge their electric cars at work, reporter Lorraine Mirabella describes the General Motors plant in White Marsh where employees can charge their cars as an employee benefit during work hours ("Plugging In On The Job", Feb. 19). The article is longer than it needs to be for what it describes and could be longer for what it didn't include. Nowhere in the article was it mentioned the average price a consumer would pay for the electric car. The article also stated that the company is part of a Department of Energy initiative to include charging stations for employees to use while at work.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
Employees at General Motors' plant in White Marsh have an unusual workplace benefit. Anyone who drives an electric car can plug it in to charge while they work. At the plant, which produces transmissions and electric motors, workers can park their electric vehicles — or EVs — in any of eight spaces under two solar-powered canopies in the employee lot. "You encourage the use of EVs and give employees some benefit," said William Tiger, plant manager for General Motors Baltimore Operations.
NEWS
December 17, 2012
Letter writer Abigail Ross Hopper talks about offering incentives to stop using gasoline ("Maryland is charged up about electric cars," Dec. 12). Maryland gives an excise tax credit to buyers of electric plug-in vehicles and gives them up to a $400 income tax credit. How then does Maryland collect transportation taxes from that car that drives on our roads? It is shooting oneself in the foot to give away taxpayers' money on the front end and not collect the transportation taxes. Richard Jendrek, Berlin
NEWS
December 11, 2012
The author of the article, "5 reasons buyers don't charge ahead on electric vehicles," (Dec. 4) is clearly unaware of the numerous steps Maryland has taken under Gov. Martin O'Malley's leadership to create incentives and facilitate the adoption of electric vehicles in our state. In 2009, Governor O'Malley and the legislature worked together to require Maryland to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 25 percent by 2020. Widespread adoption of electric vehicles is one of many strategies designed to help us reach that goal.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
Commentator Bob Bruninga would have us believe that electric cars could substantially increase the energy efficiency and decrease the environmental impact of autos while providing an economical and practical alternative to our current gasoline-fueled fleet ("Keep on open mind on electric cars," Oct. 4). Nothing could be farther from the truth. Let's look at energy efficiency. The gasoline-fueled internal combustion engine has an efficiency rate of about 25 percent, while diesels have an efficiency rate of 30 percent.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 21, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Energy Department and an engineering firm plan to announce today that they have produced electricity from gasoline through a method that yields twice as much useful energy per gallon as a car engine does, and with pollution 90 percent lower.The development raises the prospect of an electric car, still quiet, swift and clean, but without the problem of heavy batteries that must be recharged often.Instead, such a car would be refilled with energy in minutes from the pump at the corner gasoline station and get twice the gas mileage of a comparable car with an internal combustion engine.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | January 8, 1996
EVEN PUTTING aside the problem of extension cords, I don't see the new electric car catching on.I know, GM's new EV1 (Eveready 1?) doesn't actually require an electrical outlet. It's battery powered -- like the Energizer bunny or those annoying Duracell battery people of TV commercial fame.But I wonder if that's an improvement.It's hard enough to buy a car as it is. Now, we're looking at a time when, as you're ready to leave the showroom, certain you've been slickered out of everything but your Baltimore Browns boxer shorts, your final question to the salesperson will be: Are batteries included?
NEWS
By Bob Bruninga | October 3, 2012
Almost everything you read or hear about electric vehicles (EVs) is wrong - either written by deep-pocket oil company cronies, narrow-minded media, others with an interest in maintaining our total reliance on an oil society, or writers stuck in the century-old legacy thinking of the gas tank fill-once-a-week car model. The electric car is not a general replacement for the long-ranging gas car. But it is an ideal improvement for the majority of regular commuters and local travelers who would never have to go to a gas station again.
NEWS
By Jonathan Slade | August 16, 2012
Like a few thousand other vacationers one Saturday this summer, my wife Novia and I pulled into the crowded parking lot at the end of the boardwalk in Ocean City , looking forward to an afternoon of sun, sand and souvenirs. Unlike anyone else there, though, we were completing a meandering 520-mile journey that began a few days earlier in the mountains of Western Maryland - a journey in our a fully electric car, a 2012 Nissan Leaf. That's right, we drove all the way across the state on nothing but electrons.
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