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NEWS
March 14, 2013
Even Thomas Schaller would agree that statistics don't lie ("The myth of 'liberal media bias,'" March 6). Liberals make up only 20 percent of the electorate, yet they dominate the media. One only has to watch Judy Woodruff hyperventilate when speaking about guns to see how "unbiased' supposedly independent news organizations like the Public Broadcasting System are. The New York Times, Washington Post, Huffington Post, Tribune and 99 percent of the other major print and online media all pander to the collective nanny state and its agenda.
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NEWS
May 19, 2014
While the majority of the attacks against Hillary Clinton by her opponents are not only mean-spirited but also unsupported by facts, they have ample precedence in the political arena ( "Anatomy of a smear," May 14). From the time candidates decide to run for office, there have been scurrilous attacks by their opponents, questioning everything from their morals to their public and private behavior. I hope that the discerning voter will be able to separate fact from fiction and make an educated guess at election time.
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NEWS
April 9, 2014
The one thing billionaires and their special interest groups are counting on is voter apathy ( "A win for the billionaires," April 4). If they can keep the electorate focused on their personal agendas and cynical about politics, they can buy elections and get legislation passed that serves their interests to the detriment of the rest of the country. But the one thing that scares them is an educated electorate that turns out to vote. Voter turnout will always trump big money. I completely agree on the need for a constitutional convention that would affirm the right of every citizen to vote, limit the influence of big money and refuse to recognize corporations as people.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Staff Writer | September 6, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- "George Bush," Celia Fischer says with some asperity, "is not going to be sailing into Boston Harbor in this state."On the face of it, that assertion by the state director of the Clinton-Gore campaign in Pennsylvania would seem to be self-evident. But the point she is making sums up the central question about the 1992 presidential campaign as it enters the final and decisive nine weeks:Can President Bush use attacks on Bill Clinton -- such as the one that blamed Michael S. Dukakis for the pollution of Boston Harbor -- to overcome the enormous lead the Democratic nominee has achieved because of the electorate's concern about the economy and its conviction Mr. Bush is to blame?
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Staff Writer | October 31, 1993
NEW YORK -- The voters here are being treated to a throwback political campaign in the contest for mayor between Democratic incumbent David N. Dinkins and Republican challenger Rudolph W. Giuliani.Just a year after an incumbent president was unseated because he didn't pay enough attention to the serious concerns of the electorate, the campaign here has become just what New York mayoral campaigns always seem to become -- an exchange of attacks and negative commercials, a parade of prominent people offering their endorsements, an intense get-out-the-vote campaign and far more heat than light.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2002
BETHESDA -- By day, they are Washington-based ambassadors and undersecretaries, chief counsels, chief financial officers, chiefs of staff. Then they commute home to Maryland's 8th Congressional District and become PTA members, Little League coaches, soccer moms. And voters. But not just any voters. The suburban 8th District, site of a hotly contested Democratic primary, may contain the most politically plugged-in electorate in the nation. In other districts, candidates do bull roasts.
NEWS
April 9, 2014
The one thing billionaires and their special interest groups are counting on is voter apathy ( "A win for the billionaires," April 4). If they can keep the electorate focused on their personal agendas and cynical about politics, they can buy elections and get legislation passed that serves their interests to the detriment of the rest of the country. But the one thing that scares them is an educated electorate that turns out to vote. Voter turnout will always trump big money. I completely agree on the need for a constitutional convention that would affirm the right of every citizen to vote, limit the influence of big money and refuse to recognize corporations as people.
NEWS
July 21, 2013
Your article, "Md. GOP considers opening its primary" (July 18), came as a surprise since I am a member of the Baltimore County Republican Central Committee and had not heard about any plans to allow independents to vote in our primaries. Sure, we are outnumbered in registration 2-1, but that is not the problem with winning elections. To win elections, we need to have candidates with new ideas to reduce the debt and create revenue that is fair to everyone. We need candidates who are known throughout the state when competing for statewide office.
NEWS
By George F. Will | November 7, 1996
PURSING ITS LIPS austerely, the electorate saw its duty and did it pitilessly. Feeling inclined to extend the Clinton presidency, it did so in a deflating manner, making him a lame duck on a short leash held by a Congress that probably will be controlled by Republicans for the rest of his tenure. His post-election smile could be construed as an inverted grimace.Voters gave Bill Clinton what history says is a recipe for disappointment -- a second term. And they allowed Republicans to retain control of the engine of government in this era of restored congressional supremacy.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2013
The Democratic Governors Association is seeking a ruling that would allow it to expand its role in federal elections as its chief fundraiser, Gov. Martin O'Malley, is considering a run for president, documents filed with the Federal Election Commission show. In a case that could be decided as early as this month, the Washington-based governors group is seeking to increase its ability to perform voter registration and get-out-the-vote efforts in gubernatorial races - and its leadership stresses that it has no intention of engaging in campaigns for Congress or the White House.
NEWS
July 21, 2013
Your article, "Md. GOP considers opening its primary" (July 18), came as a surprise since I am a member of the Baltimore County Republican Central Committee and had not heard about any plans to allow independents to vote in our primaries. Sure, we are outnumbered in registration 2-1, but that is not the problem with winning elections. To win elections, we need to have candidates with new ideas to reduce the debt and create revenue that is fair to everyone. We need candidates who are known throughout the state when competing for statewide office.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 1, 2013
The Senate provided the country with a rare and modest glimpse of bipartisanship in its 68-32 passage of the comprehensive immigration reform bill laboriously accomplished by the Gang of Eight - four Democrats and four Republicans. But overcoming the rigid and obstructionist partisanship of the House Republicans will be another matter. House Speaker John Boehner, like a chief lemming leading his followers over a cliff, warned in advance of that Senate vote, in which 14 Republicans broke party ranks, that his flock would continue its obdurate ways on the politically explosive immigration issue.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
Commentator Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s recent column on the IRS scandal shows once again why he was twice defeated for governor of Maryland ("IRS scandal is worse than the others," June 16). He begins his weekly tirade by referring to a "hot dog" as someone who makes "the most outrageous statements of the day" - a spot on self-description. Mr. Ehrlich then does his best Rep. Darrell Issa imitation by loosely tying President Barack Obama to the latest IRS scandal before congressional hearings have been completed and before all testimony has been released.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 30, 2013
Since Mitt Romney lost to President Obama on Nov. 6, the conventional wisdom has been that the Republican Party is in trouble. The less conventional truth is that it is the Democrats whose chances may be more bleak. Yes, Republicans are currently engaged in a round of intraparty sniping between establishment conservatives and the militant, purist right-wingers who abound in the ranks of party activists. And yes, the 2012 election exposed the GOP's profound unpopularity among rising voting groups, especially Latinos.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
Even Thomas Schaller would agree that statistics don't lie ("The myth of 'liberal media bias,'" March 6). Liberals make up only 20 percent of the electorate, yet they dominate the media. One only has to watch Judy Woodruff hyperventilate when speaking about guns to see how "unbiased' supposedly independent news organizations like the Public Broadcasting System are. The New York Times, Washington Post, Huffington Post, Tribune and 99 percent of the other major print and online media all pander to the collective nanny state and its agenda.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2010
Democratic leaders were so enthusiastic about the 219,000 Marylanders who went to the polls early that on Friday there was already talk of expanding the program for the next election. Gov. Martin O'Malley, who was campaigning in Rockville, said that he'd consider adding more locations in Montgomery and Prince George's counties — where voters stood in long lines to cast ballots. The program, which ended Thursday after six days, attracted 6.3 percent of eligible voters. Democrats, who make up 56.4 percent of the Maryland electorate, proved the most enthusiastic participants, casting 63.9 percent of the early ballots, according to figures released Friday by the state Board of Elections.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2002
After every decade's census, the party in power in each state redraws legislative and congressional district boundaries to account for population shifts. The idea, ordered by the U.S. Supreme Court, is to create an arithmetically pure landscape for democracy: One person, one vote. Once accomplished, the whole exercise seems arid and silly: The carefully balanced electorate doesn't show. For four decades, American voters have been too lazy or too turned off to turn out. Some say their absence is a vote against a system they don't respect or trust.
NEWS
January 29, 2013
A recent Baltimore Sun article, "Election remake hits hurdles," (Jan. 29) brings to light new thoughts on how to change the rules of the Electoral College. At the present time, all states use the winner-take-all system except two, Maine and Nebraska. These states allow a proportional electoral vote based on their congressional districts. The article relates how, recently, various governors, senators and congressmen have suggested various schemes for revising the rules, most of them based on the award of electoral votes by the popular vote winners in their congressional districts.
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