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NEWS
January 29, 2013
A recent Baltimore Sun article, "Election remake hits hurdles," (Jan. 29) brings to light new thoughts on how to change the rules of the Electoral College. At the present time, all states use the winner-take-all system except two, Maine and Nebraska. These states allow a proportional electoral vote based on their congressional districts. The article relates how, recently, various governors, senators and congressmen have suggested various schemes for revising the rules, most of them based on the award of electoral votes by the popular vote winners in their congressional districts.
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NEWS
January 29, 2013
A recent Baltimore Sun article, "Election remake hits hurdles," (Jan. 29) brings to light new thoughts on how to change the rules of the Electoral College. At the present time, all states use the winner-take-all system except two, Maine and Nebraska. These states allow a proportional electoral vote based on their congressional districts. The article relates how, recently, various governors, senators and congressmen have suggested various schemes for revising the rules, most of them based on the award of electoral votes by the popular vote winners in their congressional districts.
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NEWS
November 8, 2012
Regardless of Election Day's results, it's time to call the Electoral College what it truly is - immoral. Obtaining equal voting rights has been a struggle in the United States since our inception. We immorally excluded women and entire ethnicities. We now find it palatable to ignore the minority vote in our winner-takes-all system. A vote for Mitt Romney in Maryland was a vote for zero, nothing, zilch. The same can be said about a vote for Barack Obama in Texas. It's time to resurrect the 91st Congress' attempt to abolish this antiquated and immoral system that systematically ignores large portions of the voting populace.
NEWS
By Brendan J. Doherty | December 13, 2012
In the aftermath of President Barack Obama's near-sweep of the critical Electoral College swing states last month, post-election analysis of the keys to his decisive victory has paid scant attention to one important factor: Mr. Obama's disproportionate focus on swing states began soon after his inauguration and continued throughout his term in office. We expect presidential candidates to target swing states as an election draws near. Since 48 of the 50 states allocate their Electoral College votes on a winner-take-all basis, campaigns focus their scarce resources on states where the outcome is in doubt.
NEWS
November 9, 2012
The "Making presidential elections fairer" commentary (Nov. 17) omits that the Electoral College is another legacy of slavery. The compromise of 1787, the counting of slaves as three-fifths of a person in determining the number of representatives in Congress to which a state was entitled (plus two senators), was the same formula used to construct the number of electors each state had in the Electoral College. Joseph R. Cowen, Baltimore
NEWS
November 6, 2012
I have a bet with a friend that if President Obama wins re-election in the Electoral College but loses the popular vote, all the raging against the Electoral College in the print and broadcast media will immediately cease. Within three months, you won't hear a peep about the Electoral College system. Wanna bet? Douglas B. Hermann, Parkville
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | April 19, 1992
Washington. -- Ross Perot's embryonic presidential candidacy is rekindling interest in the election of 1824 -- or, strictly speaking, of 1825.Rep. Dan Glickman (D-Kan.) worries about a "constitutional catastrophe," his odd description of the constitutional procedure for coping with the remote possibility that no candidate will win an electoral vote majority. Mr. Glickman, his lucidity crippled by his apprehension, says, "The election could be thrown into the Electoral College and could be thrown into the House of Representatives thereafter."
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | November 18, 2000
NOW THAT THE liberal Democrat - Maryland's 7th District Rep. Elijah E. Cummings - has had his turn at bat regarding the Electoral College (he's against it), it's the conservative Republican's turn. Enter Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. of Maryland's 2nd District, recently re-elected to Congress, as was Cummings. But unlike Cummings, who wants to see the Electoral College abolished and have our presidents elected by popular vote, Ehrlich sees no reason to fix a system that isn't broken. "The Electoral College came about to protect the interests of all people, particularly the people of smaller states," Ehrlich said this week, adding that there is no "serious discussion" in Congress of doing away with the current system.
NEWS
November 9, 2012
The "Making presidential elections fairer" commentary (Nov. 17) omits that the Electoral College is another legacy of slavery. The compromise of 1787, the counting of slaves as three-fifths of a person in determining the number of representatives in Congress to which a state was entitled (plus two senators), was the same formula used to construct the number of electors each state had in the Electoral College. Joseph R. Cowen, Baltimore
NEWS
November 8, 2012
Regardless of Election Day's results, it's time to call the Electoral College what it truly is - immoral. Obtaining equal voting rights has been a struggle in the United States since our inception. We immorally excluded women and entire ethnicities. We now find it palatable to ignore the minority vote in our winner-takes-all system. A vote for Mitt Romney in Maryland was a vote for zero, nothing, zilch. The same can be said about a vote for Barack Obama in Texas. It's time to resurrect the 91st Congress' attempt to abolish this antiquated and immoral system that systematically ignores large portions of the voting populace.
NEWS
November 6, 2012
I have a bet with a friend that if President Obama wins re-election in the Electoral College but loses the popular vote, all the raging against the Electoral College in the print and broadcast media will immediately cease. Within three months, you won't hear a peep about the Electoral College system. Wanna bet? Douglas B. Hermann, Parkville
NEWS
By Ted Venetoulis | November 5, 2012
A number of news reports have suggested the possibility of the presidential election ending in a draw - both candidates garnering 269 electors. You need 270 to win. A long shot? Maybe. It happened in 1800, when Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr each ended up with the same number of electors, proving that even the Framers weren't immune to the law of unintended consequences. Their solution to such an event produced one of their most formidable compromises: the "contingent" election, where the failure of any candidate to achieve a majority of electors would result in a vote by the House of Representatives, with each state casting one vote.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
With primary battles settled, the conventions over and the general election less than two months away, Democrats and Republicans now turn to the end game: reaching out to persuade the few remaining undecided voters that their nominee is the one to solve the nation's problems. For campaign volunteers in deep-blue Maryland, that often means traveling elsewhere. With the state expected to give its 10 electoral votes in November to President Barack Obama — Maryland has backed the Democrat in each of the past five presidential elections, and went for Obama by a 25-point margin in 2008 — activists from both parties are fanning out to Pennsylvania, Virginia and battlegrounds beyond.
EXPLORE
By Louise Vest | April 14, 2012
100 Years Ago Presidential fireworks In the Times, there was a short piece about life span of some of our presidents: "Age of Presidents "The youngest chief executive at the time of his death was James K. Polk who was fifty-three. Fourteen Presidents completed the Biblical age of threescore and ten; four of them reached eight and John Adams was ninety when he died. Among the Vice Presidents only three failed to the attain the age of sixty; 16 reached seventy; five were more than eighty years old at the time of their deaths.
EXPLORE
By EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | August 16, 2011
It's time to re-think the knee-jerk reaction that a student representative on the Harford County Board of Education is too young or too immature to be entrusted with the responsibility of having a vote on school system policy or budget matters. If we are going to have a student sitting on the board in the first place, why shouldn't they have a meaningful role in the governance of the school system, rather than being a piece of window dressing, casting show votes like something concocted right out of Soviet Russia?
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