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By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | January 31, 1995
Carroll election officials said yesterday they need to add two employees, about 120 election judges and create seven new voting precincts to handle the county's growing population and comply with the federal "motor-voter" law.The National Voter Registration Act of 1993 requires the Motor Vehicle Administration and social service agencies to give people the opportunity to register to vote.The law also says local election boards no longer may cancel voter registrations if people have not voted in an election in the past five years, said Rosemary McCloskey, Carroll's chief clerk.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
A veteran defense attorney running an independent campaign for Baltimore state's attorney was dealt a significant setback Friday when elections officials determined that he did not collect enough signatures to appear on the November ballot. Russell A. Neverdon Sr. fell more than 1,000 signatures short of the 4,160 needed to challenge Democrat Marilyn J. Mosby, a city official said. Neverdon said he will appeal the decision to Baltimore Circuit Court and, failing that, would consider running a write-in campaign for the job. "This fight has not ended by any stretch of the imagination," Neverdon said outside the offices of the Baltimore City Board of Elections.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
State election officials are prepared to pay Howard County's next election director more than those in larger Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties - and more than Howard's retiring Robert J. Antonetti Sr. sued his own board to get. News of the proposed $58,783 salary in Howard has sparked an angry reaction among other local elections officials who are preparing for the state's first all-electronic election Tuesday. "I'm going to fight for [my pay] to go up," said Barbara Fisher, Anne Arundel County's election director, who makes $52,794 after 27 years on the job. She oversees a county with 284,000 voters, compared with Howard's 157,000.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
The National Federation of the Blind has sued Maryland election officials, charging that their April decision not to approve a system that would make it easier for disabled people to cast absentee ballots privately violates federal law. The Baltimore-based federation filed suit this week asking the U.S. District Court to order the State Board of Elections to provide that technology in time for the June 24 primary election. "The right to a secret ballot that can be filled out privately and independently is just as important to people with disabilities as it is for other voters," said federation spokesman Chris Danielson.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2003
A Towson man who has raised concerns about voting procedures for the blind since 1996 sued Baltimore County and state election officials yesterday, alleging that blind voters in the county have been systematically denied the right to a secret ballot. The complaint, brought by William C. Poole Jr. and four other county residents with assistance from the American Civil Liberties Union, said election officials should implement immediately touch-screen voting machines that would allow visually impaired voters to cast a ballot without having to rely on poll workers for assistance.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | February 11, 2007
Howard County election officials drew the ire of a powerful local state senator over their opposition to a statewide bill that would require a voter-inspected paper record of ballots in time for next year's March presidential primary. With Senate Majority Leader Edward J. Kasemeyer as the prime sponsor and all but 10 of 47 state senators listed as co-sponsors - including Howard's two other senators - county elections administrator Betty L. Nordaas' caution that switching voting systems would cost the county more than $1 million provoked a reaction.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2003
A Towson man who has raised concerns about voting procedures for the blind since 1996 sued Baltimore County and state election officials yesterday, alleging that blind voters in the county have been systematically denied the right to a secret ballot. The complaint, brought by William C. Poole Jr. and four other county residents with assistance from the American Civil Liberties Union, said election officials should implement immediately touch-screen voting machines that would allow visually impaired voters to cast a ballot without having to rely on poll workers for assistance.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer | September 13, 1995
The Baltimore election board will begin opening more than 3,500 absentee ballots tomorrow at 10 a.m.More than 4,200 ballots were issued for the election. As of late yesterday, 3,564 had been returned to the election office. Of those, roughly 3,100 were cast by Democrats, according to city election officials.In addition, any ballot that arrives in today's mail and that was postmarked by Monday will be accepted.City election administrator Barbara E. Jackson said the counting of the absentee ballots should take less than a day.Baltimore election officials predicted that the absentee-ballot counting process should go much more quickly than it did in last year's disputed gubernatorial election.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
Several voters have complained that Republican Anne Arundel County Councilman John Grasso bullied and berated them as they waited in line to cast a ballot, according to the county elections board. In one case, a voter said Grasso yelled at him and jabbed a finger into his face while his children stood nearby. The voter said he'd cracked a joke about reaching the electioneering boundary where Grasso could no longer talk to him. "Mr. Grasso then acted in a very unprofessional and degrading manner and began to resort to childish and loud name calling as he verbally accosted me," Lorne M. Young of Glen Burnie wrote in an email to election officials obtained by The Baltimore Sun. Grasso acknowledged that he had been in confrontations while talking with voters, but he said the actions described by Young were in response to rude behavior.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2002
The Maryland Court of Appeals ruled yesterday that a Green Party candidate for Carroll County commissioner must appear on ballots for the November election, overruling decisions by the county's board of elections and a Circuit Court judge. George W. Murphy III will join seven other candidates on the ballot, after attorneys for the Green Party successfully argued that election officials unfairly excluded petition signatures that would have made Murphy eligible. The decision was handed down hours before county election officials mailed their final ballot forms to the printer.
NEWS
February 4, 2014
Saying it was inspired by his own run-ins with alcohol and the law, Del. Donald H. Dwyer Jr. has introduced legislation that would require jail time and rehab for public officials convicted of drunken driving and would subject legislators to removal from office if they're jailed for any offense. "Clearly, we should be held to a higher standard," said Dwyer, an Anne Arundel County Republican. The three-term delegate is serving 30 weekends in jail after being convicted of drunken driving in October.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
The City Council decided Monday to launch an investigation into the secret audit of Baltimore's speed camera system that found error rates much higher than officials have claimed publicly. "People in the city of Baltimore are losing faith in us as elected officials," said City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young. "We have to make sure that we restore their faith. Right now, people are very frustrated. " The Baltimore Sun reported last week the findings of a never-released audit that showed the city's speed cameras likely charged motorists for thousands more erroneous tickets than previously disclosed.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Each February, Larry White helps young people transform themselves into Rosa Parks, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights leaders to share stories of African-American history with others in Anne Arundel County. These days, White is busy planning his third annual Black History Month program, which he hopes will attract 200 people eager to learn not only about the past, but about how black leaders influence current events. "We don't just put on a show. We dig down so people can make a difference," said White, a Glen Burnie resident who holds two jobs in addition to his volunteer work.
NEWS
By Mike Specian | December 15, 2013
Former U.S. Senator Ted Stevens once famously stated that the Internet is a "series of tubes," an observation that would have been more comical if his committee hadn't been responsible for regulating the Internet. Rep. Michele Bachmann suggested that the HPV vaccine causes mental retardation based on the unassailable evidence that a woman at a presidential debate told her so. And their legislative colleague Rep. Todd Akin - while serving on the House Science, Space and Technology Committee - defended a ban on abortion based partially on the belief that women who are raped can shut down their pregnancies.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2013
More than 800 students in Baltimore will receive a new coat this holiday season thanks to a partnership between Baltimore firefighters, police and elected officials. The mayor, city council and first responders teamed with Operation Warm, a non-profit providing for children in need. Its the second year Baltimore firefighters have provided coats for the city's children, according to a news release. Firefighters and police will visit head start programs this week to surprise children with coats - which will be individually fitted for each child.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
Baltimore's top politicians are set to receive automatic 2.5 percent pay raises, following a years-old decision by an independent body. The salary hikes — which would increase the mayor's $159,380 salary to $163,365 — are tied to raises that city union workers receive each year, according to a 2010 decision by the Compensation Commission for Elected Officials. The cost-of-living increases would take effect in January following a legal vetting by the Board of Estimates on Wednesday.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1998
As election officials across Maryland began to count absentee ballots yesterday, Owings Mills accountant Larry M. Epstein maintained a thin lead in the race for the Republican nomination for state comptroller.Epstein, the party's 1990 nominee for the post, led rival Timothy R. Mayberry by 175 votes, according to figures provided by election officials. With hundreds of absentee ballots yet to be tallied -- including some that are not scheduled to be counted until next week -- the outcome of the race remained in doubt yesterday.
NEWS
June 27, 1995
IS the nation's new system for quick sign-ups of potential voters working? Here is what the Prince George's Journal thinks:"Motor-voter registration is a darn good idea, even if certain conservative governors from other states disagree. Some election officials in Maryland say the law, in effect since January, adds to their bureaucratic headaches and expense. But they say the problems don't seem insurmountable."If more people register to vote and then vote -- hurray! The whole idea of lining up at the Motor Vehicle Administration to get a driver's license and then getting to register to vote almost instantly on the same visit is a brilliant one. You almost want to wave a flag and eat apple pie, it's so democratic.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
After elections officials spent more than 24 hours reviewing and counting absentee and provisional ballots, Republican newcomer Mike Pantelides was named winner of the Annapolis mayoral election Friday night. Going into the count of provisional ballots Friday, Pantelides held onto a 50-vote lead over incumbent Democratic Mayor Josh Cohen. When the 65 provisional ballots were run through a scanner as an anxious crowd watched, 37 were for Pantelides and 28 were for Cohen, making Pantelides the winner by 59 votes out of nearly 8,000 cast.
NEWS
By Shanaysha Sauls | November 7, 2013
One of the most important opportunities before Baltimore is attracting the next chief executive officer to lead the city school system and its community partners in our shared goals of raising academic achievement for all students and expanding access to high-quality school programs in every area of the city and every grade level. We must continue to accelerate the school district's progress toward our vision that every student will graduate well-prepared for success in higher education and the workforce.
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