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By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer John A. Morris contributed to this article | January 20, 1995
In the wake of Ellen R. Sauerbrey's landmark election challenge, state legislative leaders said yesterday that they want to create a bipartisan task force to investigate election-law reforms.The presiding officers of the House and Senate said they are drafting an emergency bill that would set up a legislative-executive commission as early as this winter."In general we want to restore the faith and confidence of the people of Maryland in the election process," said Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., a Prince George's County Democrat.
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NEWS
June 8, 2014
You may have seen the news earlier this week: My campaign for the House of Delegates made an error involving an authority line for which I take full responsibility ( "District 12 candidate Bailey charged with criminal election law violation," June 2). They say that taking responsibility, honesty and integrity are characteristics of sound leaders. I won't change. I won't be distracted from working for Baltimore and Howard counties' working- and middle-class families, small businesses, senior citizens and veterans to ensure they receive the representation they deserve and expect from their legislators.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1998
In a possible violation of state election laws, at least a half-dozen Old Court Middle School employees were recruited and paid $125 each on primary election day to work the polls for state Senate candidate -- and current school board member -- Robert Fulton Dashiell.Dashiell, who was soundly defeated in his primary bid to unseat 10th District Democratic state Sen. Delores G. Kelley, confirmed that the $125 checks were given out at Dashiell's election night ++ headquarters at the Forum, a catering hall in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
August 5, 2013
U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder was right to tell the National Urban League last month that despite a Supreme Court ruling in July striking down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, the Justice Department will still seek to block Texas and other states from changing their voting laws in ways that limit minorities' access to the polls. The short-sighted action by the court's conservative majority threatens to turn back the clock for millions of black and Hispanic voters in states with a past history of discrimination and demands a vigorous response from the Justice Department to protect the right to cast a ballot.
NEWS
January 27, 1997
THE CLOSER Sun reporters look into campaign filings at the state election board, the clearer it becomes Maryland's election law apparatus has broken down. There is no systematic enforcement of donation limits, and precious little prosecution.Reporters William F. Zorzi Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr. discovered that at least seven individuals and companies -- including Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos and bakery entrepreneur John Paterakis -- had exceeded Maryland's $10,000 limit on political donations in a four-year cycle.
NEWS
March 29, 1996
General Assembly OKs bill to create panel on election lawsThe General Assembly gave final approval yesterday to a bill creating a commission to update Maryland's election laws and review the operations of state and local elections boards.The legislation passed the House of Delegates 137-1 and was sent to Gov. Parris N. Glendening, who is expected to sign it into law.The commission was recommended by a state task force that reviewed concerns raised by Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey in her legal challenge to the 1994 gubernatorial election, which she lost by a slim margin.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy | November 10, 2007
MOSCOW -- Russia has sharply reduced the number of European monitors permitted to observe upcoming parliament elections and has imposed restrictions that may impede the ability of opposition parties to run successful campaigns, one of Europe's main monitoring delegations said yesterday. An assessment before the Dec. 2 vote by a delegation of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe raises questions about whether political opponents can counter the government of President Vladimir V. Putin and its pervasive control over parliament and the electronic media.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 8, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Closing the door on an inquiry that threatened to embroil President Clinton in another controversy, Attorney General Janet Reno declined yesterday to recommend the appointment of an independent counsel to investigate Clinton's campaign fund-raising activities in the 1996 election.After a preliminary 90-day review, Reno said she found "clear and convincing evidence" that the president did not knowingly break federal election laws or show "criminal intent" in his involvement with issue advertisements financed by the Democratic Party.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1994
A Republican candidate for Howard County state's attorney has asked the state's special prosecutor to decide if one of his Democratic opponents violated election laws by having assistant prosecutors work for his campaign.Joseph Fleischmann II, an Ellicott City lawyer, had a letter hand-delivered to state prosecutor Stephen Montanarelli yesterday asking him to investigate the campaign of Michael Weal.Mr. Fleischmann said he's concerned that Mr. Weal violated state election laws by having two senior prosecutors -- who Mr. Weal said would serve as his deputies if he is elected -- help lead his campaign.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and David Folkenflik and Gail Gibson and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2000
A Randallstown businessman illegally funneled $10,000 to Rep. Elijah E. Cummings' 1996 election effort by having employees at ECS Technologies Inc. write personal checks to the campaign, then reimbursing them with company money, federal prosecutors say. Charges against Walter Wallace E. Hill Jr. mark the third federal case this year involving allegations of improper campaign contributions to Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat. In separate cases, Mark and Douglas Loizeaux, who run a Baltimore County demolition company, and Baltimore demolition expert Pless B. Jones also face federal charges of masking illegal donations to Cummings' 1996 and 1998 campaigns.
NEWS
November 15, 2012
Given the heated controversies over potential restrictions on voters' access to the polls during this year's presidential election, now is no time to back off on the legal protections that guarantee one of a democracy's most fundamental rights. Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear a challenge to a key provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act that protects minorities' access to the polls. The law is one of the signature legacies of the civil rights era, and experience has shown it is still needed.
NEWS
August 16, 2012
At the heart of a Pennsylvania judge's decision to let that state's voter ID requirement stand for the fall election is the notion that people can get those documents easily and cheaply, in many cases for free. Echoing the sentiments of the backers of such laws across the nation, Commonwealth Court Judge Robert Simpson no voter need be disenfranchised because they are poor or minority. But the reality is quite different. As a recent report from the Brennan Center for Justice notes, it's not so easy to obtain a state-issued ID in states with restrictive voter ID laws.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
The election fraud trial of veteran political consultant Julius Henson has been postponed again due to scheduling conflicts. A hearing on preliminary motions in the case, which centers on an Election Day 2010 robocall, is now scheduled for April 10 with the trial expected to start on April 30. The case was postponed earlier this month because of the illness of a state investigator. Henson, 62, faces two counts of conspiracy to violate election laws, one count of election fraud and one count of failing to include a campaign authority line on the call.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
The trial of a veteran political operative, charged with violating election laws by sending out robocalls on Election Day last year that suggested voting was over, was postponed Tuesday after the only judge available to hear the case recused himself. Julius Henson, 62, who at the time was working for former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. on his 2010 campaign, is charged with three counts of conspiracy to violate election laws, among other charges. A new trial was set for February. The case was assigned to Baltimore Circuit Judge Charles J. Peters, but, according to Henson's attorney, Edward Smith Jr., Peters recused himself because he had recently been appointed by Gov. Martin O'Malley, Ehrlich's opponent in last year's gubernatorial election.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2011
A Baltimore developer has paid a $55,000 fine to settle a case in which the Federal Election Commission found the company used corporate funds to make campaign contributions in the names of company executives during the 2006 election cycle. Edward St. John, chairman and owner of St. John Properties Inc., agreed to pay the civil penalty after the commission found that political contributions by six senior vice presidents, who were later reimbursed by the company, violated laws that prohibit corporations from using general funds to help elect candidates to federal office, the FEC reported.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
Opponents of slots at Arundel Mills mall are asking Maryland's attorney general to investigate claims that the Cordish Cos. violated election law by offering ownership stakes and perks to local business owners in exchange for support of its planned billion-dollar casino. In a letter Thursday to Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, the group No Slots at the Mall contends that Cordish Chairman David Cordish acted improperly in offering local business owners the chance to invest in his planned Maryland Live!
NEWS
July 10, 1996
ANY ELECTED OFFICIAL should undergo close scrutiny when soliciting money from the public. Maryland's election laws, though not as strong as they should be, help by requiring office-seekers to file campaign finance reports at regular intervals. These rules enable citizens to watch for connections between elected officials' decisions and the flow of donations to their campaigns. But an article last Sunday by Craig Timberg of the Howard County bureau of The Sun underscored a gaping loophole in state and local laws.
NEWS
February 5, 1997
PERHAPS ONCE A DECADE, politicians get serious about strengthening state election laws. This time it took a series of missteps by Gov. Parris N. Glendening to spur reforms backed by the General Assembly's presiding officers. Yet lawmakers may still weaken these bills, leaving only the illusion that "reforms" have taken place.Advocacy groups are concerned that legislators don't really want to see sweeping changes, that they don't truly want to open their campaign finance reports to scrutiny by the public.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2010
"The Robert and Kendel Ehrlich Show," which airs for two hours each Saturday morning on WBAL-AM, should not be considered a campaign contribution, the Maryland attorney general's office said in a letter released Monday. The letter came as advice to the State Board of Elections after the Maryland Democratic Party complained to the board that the show is essentially an unreported in-kind campaign contribution from the station to former Republican Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who is trying to reclaim the state's top job from Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
By Ned Parker, Raheem Salman and Usama Redha and Ned Parker, Raheem Salman and Usama Redha , Tribune Newspapers | December 9, 2009
BAGHDAD - - As Iraqi officials prepared to announce a new date for long-delayed national elections, car bombs detonated at government buildings and in crowded Baghdad streets Tuesday, killing at least 127 people and wounding about 500 more. The attacks on state institutions appeared aimed at further eroding the Iraqi people's faith in the political process, which many already viewed with deep skepticism. The morning blasts shook the eastern and western sides of the city over a span of about 30 minutes, gutting parts of the city's main courthouse on the western side of the Tigris River and other buildings.
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