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Election Judges

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NEWS
November 25, 2007
The Howard County Board of Elections is seeking election judges to serve in 110 polling locations for the Feb. 12 presidential primary election, according to the League of Women Voters. Judges work from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. and are paid $165; chief judges are paid $220. There is also compensation for mandatory training. The league also said that those interested in serving on the Howard County Board of Education, the Howard County Circuit Court or as delegates to the Republican or Democratic conventions must file as candidates by Dec. 3. The deadline to change party affiliation has passed.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 25, 2014
In Ukraine last month, some people braved the threat of violence to get to the polls to vote for a new president. According to news reports, heavily armed men in ski masks tried to scare off voters by smashing ballot boxes and blocking entry to polling stations in the eastern part of the country; election officials were threatened, some kidnapped. In Maryland, we just had a primary election to nominate candidates for governor - you know, like the president of Maryland - and the voter turnout was embarrassingly low . The vast majority of registered Democrats and Republicans did not participate.
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NEWS
By Staff report | February 27, 1991
The City Council amended the city charter Monday, empowering the mayor to appoint additional election judges for May's municipal election.With increases in voter registration expected, Mayor W. Benjamin Brown has sought more judges and an additional polling place. The mayor had warned that a crush of voters would overrun the three election judges on hand last May 13 at Westminster's only voting location, the volunteer fire company on Main Street.Half of Brown's wish was granted Monday.The council remained unconvinced that voter turnout would jump as dramatically as the mayor predicts, and introduced the ordinance last month only after the provisions for an additional polling place had been removed.
EXPLORE
November 7, 2011
We have just completed our Laurel 2011 election cycle. First, I want to thank my wife, Mary Eileen, and daughters, Marianne and Katie, for helping me with my campaign. I also want to thank our mayor and my friend, Craig Moe, and my Council colleagues Valerie, Donna and Fred; and Eddie, our Council colleague-elect, for a great Laurel Team effort. This election cycle I relied upon Candy DiPietro to take over as my treasurer after her mother, Peggy Anderson, had provided a steady hand in this area for the past 15 years - we all miss Peggy!
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | June 4, 2006
In an era of electronic voting machines, computerized registration books and ever more sophisticated election technology, who better than teenagers to work as election judges? Statewide, elections board administrators are seeking energetic young people knowledgeable about electronics to fill the perennial need for thousands of local poll judges, using a law that went into effect in 2001 allowing high school students to serve. "They are excellent workers, and they are so not intimidated by electronics," said Jacqueline K. McDaniel, Baltimore County's supervisor of elections.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2011
Baltimore's election judges will be ferried to the polls by Yellow Cabs this fall, under an up-to-$30,000 deal approved by the city's Board of Estimates Thursday. The contract was not competitively bid, but awarded to Yellow Cab because it is the "only known vendor that has the proven resources" to deliver the judges, according to the board's agenda. Baltimore City Elections Board Chair Armstead B.C. Jones Sr. said that the cabs would wait outside board of elections offices near City Hall to take substitute judges to the polls during the September primary and November general election.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | September 30, 2006
Baltimore election judges will get a boost in pay for the general election this year, a move backers say they hope will cut down on the widespread tardiness and absenteeism that added chaos to this month's primary. A bill increasing city election judge pay by $25 a day and $50 for chief judges - passed long before the primary problems - goes into effect tomorrow, along with dozens of other measures, including stiffer penalties for teenage drunken drivers. City election officials say recruiting enough qualified election judges in the city - especially enough Republicans - is a chronic problem exacerbated by the long hours workers must put in at the polls and the low pay. Now, city election judges will make $150 and chief election judges $200 for a workday that can stretch beyond 14 hours.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | February 9, 2007
Lawmakers have proposed ending the state requirement that two Democrats and two Republicans oversee election returns at every precinct. The move is aimed at avoiding scrambles for poll workers from a minority party on Election Day. The change would allow election officials to hire all poll workers statewide on a nonpartisan basis. The General Assembly is weighing dozens of bills that would fine-tune election laws in response to problems during last year's campaign, such as candidates changing their names to get a better position on the ballot and a shortage of election judges that caused long waits outside polling places.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | September 17, 2006
Anne Arundel County's elections director blamed a shortage of poll workers for a mishap last week that left thousands of primary votes missing and uncounted on election night, and said she worries that a lack of volunteers and inadequate training with electronic voting machines could "overload" the county's vote-counting system in November. Candidates for several offices, including those in the hotly contested Republican primary for county executive, had to wait until the day after the primary to find out who won, as election officials sorted out what happened to several missing electronic memory cards that stored votes.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2004
Election judge George Ruggles had practically memorized the 69-page manual on how to do his job. Piece of cake, he thought. Then he saw this year's 101-page version, and it's causing him quite a headache. More instructions. More responsibility. And new high-tech voting machines. "Computers," the 81-year-old Anne Arundel County resident says. "That's not my strength. I have to really work at it." It seems that every election Maryland officials have trouble recruiting enough election judges -- the people who oversee voting precincts on election days and assist confused voters.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
BREAKING NEWS ALERT:  Stephanie Rawlings-Blake glided to victory in the Democratic primary Tuesday, securing the nomination for a full four-year term in the office to which she was appointed last year. ----- Baltimore voters headed to the polls this morning, casting their ballots for mayor in a crowded primary race that could change the direction of the city. But as of 7 p.m., less than 17 percent of eligible voters - about 54,000 people - had cast ballots, a number Baltimore City Elections Director Armstead Jones called "light.
EXPLORE
July 26, 2011
Laurel's Board of Election Supervisors is looking for city residents to serve as election day judges for the city's general election Nov. 1. Board officials have said that they prefer judges who have prior experience, but that experience as an election day judge is not necessary. Interested residents should send a resume or letter of interest to Kimberley Rau, clerk to the Board of Election Supervisors. For more information about serving as a Laurel election day judge, call 301-725-5300, ext. 2121 or email krau@laurel.md.us .
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 15, 2011
Margaret K. Eby, a homemaker and civic volunteer, died July 1 at Gilchrist Hospice Center in Towson of complications from a fall. She was 86 and lived in the Pickersgill Retirement Community. Born Margaret Keene in Baltimore and raised on Wyman Parkway, she was a descendant of Richard Keene, an early Maryland settler, whose life she studied. She attended SS. Philip & James School, where she met her future husband, Arthur Eby. She was a 1942 Seton High School graduate and worked for the old Equitable Trust Co. and for the Navy Department at Port Covington.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2011
Baltimore's election judges will be ferried to the polls by Yellow Cabs this fall, under an up-to-$30,000 deal approved by the city's Board of Estimates Thursday. The contract was not competitively bid, but awarded to Yellow Cab because it is the "only known vendor that has the proven resources" to deliver the judges, according to the board's agenda. Baltimore City Elections Board Chair Armstead B.C. Jones Sr. said that the cabs would wait outside board of elections offices near City Hall to take substitute judges to the polls during the September primary and November general election.
NEWS
November 3, 2010
I volunteered as an election judge this year, working as a check-in judge for both the primary and general election in Anne Arundel County. Not only did I feel this was part of my civic duty, but I wanted to see the workings of a polling place first-hand. One thing I found disturbs me to the core. If I write a check in a store, I must produce a driver's license. When I go to my own bank to draw money out of my account, I must produce a driver's license. If I need to go to the doctor, I must produce a driver's license.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
With the state's first attempt at early voting in a general election set to begin Friday, officials still are working out kinks in the system. After a trial run in last month's primaries, lawmakers are considering allowing those votes to be counted earlier on Election Day — an idea that has raised red flags among Republican and policy groups concerned that politicians could take advantage of the information. Even with historically low turnout for the primaries Sept. 14, election judges were overwhelmed with work that night, prompting results from some of the larger areas to trickle in at a slower-than-usual pace.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,SUN REPORTER | September 29, 2006
Baltimore election officials will hire an independent center tied to the University of Baltimore to train city poll workers for the Nov. 7 general election - part of a larger effort to eliminate problems that beset the primary election this month. The city Board of Elections voted unanimously to hire the Schaefer Center for Public Policy to conduct poll worker training and to recruit election judges so that the city employees who had been charged with that task before could be freed up to focus on other problems.
NEWS
September 16, 2010
The aftermath of Tuesday's primary election has again focused anxiety on Maryland's electronic voting system, with candidates angry about delayed results and, in the case of the Baltimore state's attorney race, one claiming up to 10,000 votes are missing. The questions about the integrity of the process are fueled by what seems like a low-tech component of the system — the transfer of data from the voting machines to county boards of election — that led to several cases of election night human error.
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