Advertisement
HomeCollectionsElection Fraud
IN THE NEWS

Election Fraud

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
A Republican lawmaker, supported by the Hose GOP leadership, is seeking an investigation into a report that an election fraud watchdog group found 173 cases in which people voted in the same election in Maryland and Florida. Del. Kelly Schulz, a Frederick County Republican, wrote to State Board of Elections to request an investigation into the report by the national group True the Vote. While officially nonpartisan, the group is largely supported by Republicans. Schulz's request received the backing Thursday of the House GOP causus, which extended the investigation request to Gov. Martin O'Malley and Attorney General  Douglas  F. Gansler.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 7, 2014
The "experts" may be worried about election fraud in Maryland, but the Democratic Party isn't ( "Experts worry about election fraud threat," Feb. 6). Democrats foster voter fraud because the perpetrators overwhelmingly vote Democratic. The customary bromide is that they are making "voter access" as convenient as possible. Frankly, why does it have to be any more convenient than it is now? It is a heck of a lot easier in this country to vote than to board an airplane or cash a check.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2012
The election fraud trial of long-time political consultant Julius Henson is set for Monday at 2 p.m. in Baltimore Circuit Court.  Henson, 62, of East Baltimore, is accused of election fraud, conspiracy to violation election laws and failure to provide a campaign authority line on an Election Day 2010 robocall he created as a consultant for former Gov.Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. The robocall, sent to thousands of voters as Democratic Gov. Martin...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
A Republican lawmaker, supported by the Hose GOP leadership, is seeking an investigation into a report that an election fraud watchdog group found 173 cases in which people voted in the same election in Maryland and Florida. Del. Kelly Schulz, a Frederick County Republican, wrote to State Board of Elections to request an investigation into the report by the national group True the Vote. While officially nonpartisan, the group is largely supported by Republicans. Schulz's request received the backing Thursday of the House GOP causus, which extended the investigation request to Gov. Martin O'Malley and Attorney General  Douglas  F. Gansler.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
The election fraud trial of veteran political consultant Julius Henson has been postponed again due to scheduling conflicts. A hearing on preliminary motions in the case, which centers on an Election Day 2010 robocall, is now scheduled for April 10 with the trial expected to start on April 30. The case was postponed earlier this month because of the illness of a state investigator. Henson, 62, faces two counts of conspiracy to violate election laws, one count of election fraud and one count of failing to include a campaign authority line on the call.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
A Baltimore jury Tuesday found Paul Schurick, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s campaign manager, guilty of fraud and related charges for his role in an Election Day 2010 robocall - a decision hailed by government watchdog groups who say that for too long dirty tricks have tainted Maryland politics. The robocall, sent to thousands of voters as Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley swept to a re-election victory, was designed to suppress black votes by telling recipients to "relax" and assuring them that O'Malley had been successful even though the polls had not yet closed, the jury found.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Political consultant Julius Henson's attorney used a stack of fake oversized money, invoked slavery and called prosecutors' election fraud case against his client a "bunch of bull-honky" during his closing argument Wednesday afternoon. Using props, charts and a blend of humor and outrage, Edward Smith Jr. talked to the jury for an hour, shifting his style between folksy and erudite. He quoted lyrics from the song "Backstabbers" by the O'Jays, showed jurors a photo of what he called a "twisted" man meant to represent the prosecution, and recommended that the deputy state prosecutor "just walk out the door right now" rather than present his arguments.
NEWS
By Paul Rogat Loeb | March 18, 2007
They just wanted to protect the sanctity of the vote. That's the Bush administration's pious explanation for firing eight U.S. attorneys who were Republican enough for President Bush to have appointed them in the first place. "The president recalls hearing complaints about election fraud not being vigorously prosecuted and believes he may have informally mentioned it to the attorney general," explained White House spokeswoman Dana Perino. How could you question such a laudable goal? Of course, the justifications keep shifting, as with the Iraqi war. First it was the general performance of the prosecutors.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | September 18, 2008
The Rev. Jesse Jackson last night headlined a panel that encouraged people to battle voter fraud and disenfranchisement by casting early ballots and registering multiple times to vote. Jackson, founder and president of the Rainbow/PUSH Coalition and a presidential candidate in 1984 and 1988, was joined by investigative journalist Greg Palast and author Jonathan Simon at the Maryland Institute College of Art. The discussion was moderated by radio host Marc Steiner. All panelists criticized what they said were rigged presidential elections in 2000 and 2004.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
After about eight hours of deliberations Thursday, the Baltimore Circuit Court jury considering the fate of political consultant Julius Henson went home for a second day without reaching a verdict. Henson, 63, of East Baltimore, faces charges of election fraud, conspiracy and failure to include a campaign authority line on an automated call he orchestrated on Election Day 2010. Prosecutors say Republican former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s campaign used the call in an attempt to suppress black votes.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Maryland's second-highest court upheld on Monday political consultant Julius Henson's conspiracy conviction in a robocall scheme that prosecutors said was designed to suppress black votes. The Maryland Court of Special Appeals reaffirmed the conviction, writing that the case "presents us with a sad tale. " A judge wrote that Henson "and his collaborators callously attempted to manipulate members of the electorate. " Henson, 64, was found guilty in May 2012 of conspiracy to violate election law by not including an authority line from a robocall used as part of the campaign to elect Republican former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. Erhlich lost the election to incumbent Gov. Martin O'Malley, a Democrat.
NEWS
By Cathy Kelleher | September 17, 2012
Election fraud strikes at the heart of our political system and threatens our freedom. When fraudulent votes cancel out legal votes, our rights as citizens are diminished. Free and fair elections are our American birthright, and citizen initiatives to safeguard voter integrity are a welcome development, supporting and supplementing the work of boards of elections across the country. In a state such as Maryland, where voter ID is not required, the administration of polls is critical to the success of an election that is free of irregularities.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
Julius Henson, the former political consultant sentenced to 60 days in jail last month for writing a 2010 Election Day robocall that prosecutors said was designed to suppress black votes, has requested his immediate release so that he can visit his elderly mother before she dies. Henson's attorney, Edward Smith Jr., was advised Monday night that Mary Henson had been admitted to the critical care unit of Good Samaritan Hospital in New York, where she was forced to move to live with her daughter after her son, whom she'd previously lived with, was incarcerated, according to court documents.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
Political consultant Julius Henson, who wrote the 2010 Election Day robocall that prosecutors said was designed to suppress black votes, was led from a Baltimore courthouse in handcuffs Wednesday after being sentenced to 60 days in jail. Baltimore Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown also ordered Henson, 63, to complete 300 hours of community service. Brown announced his sentence after listening to Henson cast himself as a victim in his final remarks to the court. "The state has a problem with the First Amendment.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
Political consultant Julius Henson must pay the state $1 million for putting out 112,000 robocalls intended to discourage black voters from going to the polls on Election Day 2010, a federal judge ruled Tuesday. "Voter suppression in Maryland will not be tolerated," Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said in a statement. "The court's opinion and damages award will hopefully make political consultants think twice before using these types of illegal dirty tricks again. " Henson violated the Telephone Consumer Protection Act with the "express purpose of suppressing the votes of a minority group in a contested statewide gubernatorial election," U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake wrote in a 13-page memorandum.
NEWS
May 11, 2012
Political consultant Julius Henson deserved to be held to account for his role in producing a fraudulent robocall on the night of the 2010 gubernatorial election that was clearly designed to prevent Democrats - and in particular, African-American voters - from going to the polls. It is disappointing, though, that the jury rendered a mixed verdict in the case, convicting him on just one count of conspiracy but finding him not guilty on three other charges. A separate jury last year convicted Paul Schurick, the former aide to Gov.Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Mr. Henson's employer in that election, on all four counts for the same offense.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 9, 1998
DIGOS, Philippines -- As a presidential race tainted by violence and chicanery draws to a close, Vice President Joseph "Erap" Estrada is the man of the people to beat Monday.From a field of 10 1/2 candidates -- former first lady Imelda Marcos was in the race, dropped out and now is half-heartedly back in -- Filipino voters seem ready to elect a controversial former B-movie actor to navigate their country through the Asian financial turmoil and into the 21st century.Estrada's detractors scorn the 61-year-old, who has a seemingly insurmountable lead in the polls.
NEWS
November 2, 2004
POLLS IN MARYLAND BUSIEST TIMES: Morning, lunchtime and late in the day. FOR PROBLEMS: Contact local election offices. The U.S. attorney's office also will maintain a hot line for election fraud or voting rights abuses at 410-209-4800 and 443-677-9014. RESULTS ONLINE Go to Baltimoresun.com for a live feed of Election Night numbers with nationwide and statewide results, breaking news from The Sun and graphics showing in real time the developing electorial map and makeup of Congress.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
After about eight hours of deliberations Thursday, the Baltimore Circuit Court jury considering the fate of political consultant Julius Henson went home for a second day without reaching a verdict. Henson, 63, of East Baltimore, faces charges of election fraud, conspiracy and failure to include a campaign authority line on an automated call he orchestrated on Election Day 2010. Prosecutors say Republican former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s campaign used the call in an attempt to suppress black votes.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
Political consultant Julius Henson's attorney used a stack of fake oversized money, invoked slavery and called prosecutors' election fraud case against his client a "bunch of bull-honky" during his closing argument Wednesday afternoon. Using props, charts and a blend of humor and outrage, Edward Smith Jr. talked to the jury for an hour, shifting his style between folksy and erudite. He quoted lyrics from the song "Backstabbers" by the O'Jays, showed jurors a photo of what he called a "twisted" man meant to represent the prosecution, and recommended that the deputy state prosecutor "just walk out the door right now" rather than present his arguments.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.