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Baltimore Sun reporter | November 5, 2012
UPDATED 2:18 p.m. [ President and Vice President of the United States (Maryland) ] 0 of 1846 precincts reporting All Write Ins 0% 0 Barack Obama And Joe Biden 0% 0 Jill Stein And Cheri Honkayla 0% 0 Gary Johnson And James P. Gray 0% 0 Mitt Romney And Paul Ryan 0% 0 [ U.S. Senator ] 0 of 1846 precincts reporting All Write Ins 0% 0 Ben Cardin 0% 0 Dean Ahmad 0% 0 Daniel John Bongino 0% 0 S. Rob Sobhani 0% 0 [ Question 1 - P.G. County Orphans' Court ]
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NEWS
October 8, 2014
With the midterm elections just weeks away, I was reminded of a comment by Abraham Lincoln: "Elections belong to the people. It's their decision. If they decide to turn their back on the fire and burn their behinds, then they will just have to sit on their blisters. " When it comes to voting, the electorate has three choices: Stay at home and sit it out; accept things as they are; or act on a desire for change. Does one vote really matter? Consider that in the recent Republican primary election for Baltimore County executive, candidate George Harman won by just 18 votes.
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NEWS
June 30, 2014
In response to R.N. Ellis' letter congratulating herself on the fact that she has never missed voting in a primary election and has always worked on some candidate or other's campaign: Please, Ms. Ellis, vote as much as you want but stop harassing me with fliers, phone calls, yard signs, giant billboards and - worst of all - those idiotic street waves ( "Distressed to see such low turnout," June 28). Volunteers like you tie up traffic, create litter and ruin the only time that most families have to spend together, in the evenings between 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. I have been getting an average of four phone calls a night from volunteers or recorded messages from candidates, which increased to eight a day just before the primary.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
The Baltimore City Council on Monday unanimously approved Federal Hill Neighborhood Association President Eric T. Costello to fill a vacant seat, but several members expressed concern over a process they said lacked true community involvement. Costello, 33, a New York native, is an auditor in the U.S. Government Accountability Office. After the council vote, he was sworn in by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and took his seat representing the 11th District, which includes Federal Hill, Bolton Hill and downtown.
NEWS
By SHOSHANA BRYEN | December 28, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Real democracy has many prerequisites to the ballot - a free press, multiple centers of legitimate power (religious institutions, labor unions, local councils, regional governments), an informed electorate and societal tolerance of dissenting views are but a few of the most important. The Bush administration, unfortunately, has had a tendency to characterize every country or entity that holds a vote a "democracy" and anything that results from balloting "democratic." We are beginning to see the problem this position engenders.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,New York Times News ServiceSun Staff Correspondent | November 18, 1991
NEW ORLEANS -- For the first day in a month, Louisianans could breathe easily yesterday. David Duke would not be their next governor after all.But behind the lopsided returns in Saturday's election lay a sobering fact: A majority of the state's white voters -- about 55 percent -- had cast their ballots for the former Klansman and neo-Nazi.Despite an unprecedented and wildly successful negative ad campaign aimed at stopping him, Mr. Duke got 75,000 more votes than he received in his U.S. Senate bid last year.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 29, 2010
A group of black lawmakers appears to have blocked Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's effort to end voters' ability to choose Circuit Court judges. Gansler's proposal, which aimed to replace contested elections with retention elections every 10 years, is languishing in key committees in the House of Delegates and the Senate. The chairmen of both said Monday that the Legislative Black Caucus' strong opposition has doomed Gansler's bill. "That spelled its demise," said Sen. Brian E. Frosh, a Montgomery County Democrat and chairman of the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee, who does not plan to forward the legislation to the full Senate.
NEWS
November 8, 2010
Eileen Ambrose's column Sunday about the implications of the recent election for investors doesn't start off very well ( "What a split Congress means for investors," Nov. 7). She says the four major issues are "the deficit, economy, Social Security and Medicare. " I'll grant her "the economy" but the other three are just the same tired old right-wing Republican shibboleths — non-issues if we got the economy right, really. (Well, genuine health care reform would have helped Medicare.
NEWS
October 22, 2012
I wonder how many Americans have an understanding of what is probably the most profound consequence of the 2012 election. With several of the U.S. Supreme Court justices in their 70s, it is expected that anywhere from one to four justices will retire during the next four years, leaving vacancies to be nominated by the president who is in office at the time. Currently, the court is evenly divided between moderates and conservatives, which is a good thing so that no political ideology will consistently affect laws and life in the United States.
NEWS
November 6, 2012
The harm and damage that President Barack Obama has imposed on the U.S. calls for impeachment proceedings. Our deficit is now reaching levels from which it will be difficult if not impossible to recover because of failed policies and an incompetent administration. Mr. Obama has made our country a lot less safe with the START treaty. His failed Mideast policy has now put Israel on the line. His muddled policies in Afghanistan and Iraq will eventually cause us to fail there as well.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The Maryland Board of Elections determined Republican Larry Hogan broke a campaign finance rule, but the panel agreed Thursday to waive the fine associated with the minor infraction. Elections officials cleared Hogan of wrongdoing in two of three charges leveled against him by the Maryland Democratic Party this summer. In the third charge, officials determined Hogan violated campaign-finance rules by not paying his advocacy group, Change Maryland, for a poll the group sold to his campaign.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A veteran defense attorney running an independent campaign for Baltimore state's attorney argued in Circuit Court Friday that city election workers "messed up" when they ruled he did not have enough signatures to appear on the November ballot.  "Just because they say it's so, don't make it so," said Edward Smith Jr., the attorney for candidate Russell A. Neverdon Sr. "Each and every [signature] they looked at, they messed up. " Judge Martin P. Welch said he will postpone ruling on the case until after he hears more evidence next Friday.  The city's Board of Elections said earlier this monrth that Neverdon fell more than 1,000 signatures short of the 4,160 needed to challenge Democrat Marilyn J. Mosby on the general election ballot.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
The State Board of Elections has alerted the Office of the State Prosecutor to a report that 164 people voted in both Maryland and Virginia in the November 2012 presidential election, in violation of the law. Election officials confirmed Thursday that the referral included 17 cases in which the Fairfax County, Va., elections board investigated the report by outside advocacy groups and said they found that ballots had been cast in that county and...
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
A veteran defense attorney running an independent campaign for Baltimore state's attorney was dealt a significant setback Friday when elections officials determined that he did not collect enough signatures to appear on the November ballot. Russell A. Neverdon Sr. fell more than 1,000 signatures short of the 4,160 needed to challenge Democrat Marilyn J. Mosby, a city official said. Neverdon said he will appeal the decision to Baltimore Circuit Court and, failing that, would consider running a write-in campaign for the job. "This fight has not ended by any stretch of the imagination," Neverdon said outside the offices of the Baltimore City Board of Elections.
NEWS
August 9, 2014
How ironic that Kevin Kamenetz suddenly is "on the side of the taxpayers - and good common sense!" ( "Kamenetz trumps Dance," Aug. 4.) And what a shame that many of these critical issues were not deemed to be important in previous circumstances! Where was this common sense when the citizens of Mays Chapel implored the county executive, County Council and the school system to solve the central corridor school overcrowding problems in ways that included: converting Cromwell Valley to a neighborhood elementary school rather than a magnet school, using unused local school seats to avoid creation of a commuter school, protecting the community from a dangerous onslaught of excess traffic, saving 10 acres of beautiful forested parkland, and selecting far more cost effective ways of creating additional school seats?
NEWS
August 8, 2014
"When government fears the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. " While there may be dispute as to source of this famous quote, the content is unquestionable. Government at any level administered through the hand of intimidation, fear and unethical practice "becomes the master and we the people become their servants. " Alison Knezevich's article "Balto. Co. police should not have contacted Dundalk activist, chief says," (July 28), clearly identifies the principle of such intimidation and fear as imposed upon those who dare to contradict or challenge those elected to serve.
EXPLORE
December 1, 2012
Not entering into a political debate with the writer ("Many reasons why the voters decided to re-elect the president," Catonsville Times, Nov. 28), but even if he was 100% correct in his gratuitous assertions, his attempt at an explanation and reconciliation is all for naught because his arrogant, elitist, and condescending last sentence ( "It's time for the losers to stop whining and acting like the world is coming to an end. Man up, for God's sake.), I believe, rightly sums up his caustic character and political acumen.
NEWS
November 28, 2012
I predict that the Nov. 6, 2012 election will be a benchmark in American history. The re-election of a black president is a bugle call to the future to begin. The status quo is dying to make way for a new sense of democracy. The numbers showed that there are more of "us" then there are of "them. " The Republican Party could not muster enough of their camp to overtake those of us who want change. This alone is historical. Moreover, here are the historical reasons for my prediction: Since the nation re-elected Barack Obama, bigotry is in decay.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Veteran defense attorney Russell A. Neverdon Sr. brought about 6,000 signatures to the city's Board of Elections on Monday - a total that, if verified, will put him on November's ballot as an independent candidate for Baltimore state's attorney. With his family by his side, Neverdon, 46, pointed to the petition effort as evidence his candidacy has grass-roots support. "We've spent sleepless nights, long weekends, long days," Neverdon said. "The citizens of Baltimore spoke, and they want a choice.
NEWS
Jules Witcover | July 28, 2014
Congressional midterm elections, the poor cousin to presidential voting in the American political system, will take on a critical role for President Barack Obama in November. The results may well determine whether he will become a premature lame duck two years before his second and last term expires. If the Democrats lose the U.S. Senate, where they hold a practical 55-45 voting control with the help of Independent Sen. Angus King of Maine, the Republicans will be able to intensify the obstructionism with which they have paralyzed the Obama legislative agenda in the House of Representatives over the last nearly six years.
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