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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 7, 2005
Asked how she hoped to be remembered, Shirley Chisholm, the trailblazing former congresswoman who died last month at age 80, said: "I would like them to say that Shirley Chisholm had guts." If Chisholm '72 - Unbought & Unbossed, a PBS documentary on her life and career that airs tonight, shows anything, it's that she was indeed one brave woman. With the assassinations of other liberal politicians and black leaders, including Sen. Robert Kennedy and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., still fresh in American memory, Chisholm, the first black woman elected to Congress, boldly ran for president in 1972.
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By Luke Broadwater | July 13, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. Articles • One less independent thinker in Washington:  Ron Paul won't seek re-election to Congress. ( The Facts )  • Classy, as always:  Bill Maher hopes Bachmann and Palin split the MILF vote. ( Huffington Post )  • Probably a good idea: Casey Anthony might live in disguise upon release from prison ( Chicago Sun-Times )
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NEWS
By Joel Havemann and Joel Havemann,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Virgil H. Goode Jr., a Virginia Republican, yesterday stood by his demand for strict immigration controls that he said would prevent Muslims from being elected to Congress and using the Quran during swearing-in ceremonies. Islamic groups in the United States called on Republicans to repudiate Goode's remarks, which he first made in a letter attacking the use of the holy book in an unofficial ceremonial oath-taking next month by the first Muslim elected to the House. "I do not apologize and I do not retract my letter," Goode said emphatically during a session yesterday with reporters in the southern Virginia town of Rocky Mount.
NEWS
December 16, 2007
JULIA CARSON, 69 Indiana congresswoman Rep. Julia Carson, the first African-American and first woman to represent Indianapolis in Congress, died of lung cancer yesterday in Indianapolis, family spokeswoman Vanessa Summer said. Ms. Carson's death came three weeks after she announced that the terminal cancer had been diagnosed, after years of health trouble. She said days later that she would not run next year for a seventh term representing the district that covers most of Indianapolis.
NEWS
August 2, 1995
Thomas E. Morgan, 88, who spent 32 years in Congress and served on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, died Monday in Waynesburg, Pa., after a long illness. A physician, he was elected to Congress in 1944 during the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt and retired in 1976 during Gerald Ford's administration.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 3, 2007
Home is not where your grandparents are buried but where your children are born. Muslim Americans, a majority of which were born in another country, should start looking at America as their very own country. They really need to invest and feel a part of America." - REP. KEITH ELLISON, a Minnesota Democrat, urging his fellow Muslims to become more engaged in American civic life; Mr. Ellison became the first Muslim elected to Congress in 2006
NEWS
September 30, 1994
Robert L. F. Sikes, 88, who served for 38 years in Congress and was nicknamed the "He coon" because of his raccoon-like tenacity, died Wednesday of Alzheimer's disease in Crestview, Fla. The Democrat was elected to Congress in 1940. He was credited with building his district into an arsenal with 14 military nTC bases at the height of his career in the mid-1960s.
NEWS
September 28, 2006
Joel T. Broyhill, 86, who represented northern Virginia for more than two decades in Congress and escaped from a German prison camp in World War II, died Sunday of congestive heart failure and pneumonia at his home in Arlington. A Republican first elected to Congress in 1952, he developed a reputation for constituent service that became legendary. He was also known for his opposition to the establishment of home rule in the District of Columbia, and he frequently clashed with Walter Washington, who would become the city's first mayor, and Marion S. Barry Jr., who was a community activist during Mr. Broyhill's time in Congress.
FEATURES
November 7, 1997
Today in history: Nov. 7In 1874, the Republican Party was symbolized as an elephant in a cartoon by Thomas Nast in Harper's Weekly magazine.In 1916, Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana became the first woman elected to Congress.In 1917, Russia's Bolshevik Revolution took place as forces led by Vladimir Ilyich Lenin overthrew the provisional government of Alexander Kerensky.In 1967, Carl Stokes was elected the first black mayor of a major city -- Cleveland, Ohio.In 1989, L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia became the first elected black governor in U.S. history; David N. Dinkins was elected New York City's first black mayor.
NEWS
By RAY JENKINS | November 3, 1991
George Herbert Walker Bush -- scion of a wealthy Connecticut banking family, son of a U.S. senator, graduate of Phillips Andover and Yale, millionaire oilman from Texas -- has accused members of Congress of being a "privileged class."And who are the members of that "privileged class"? Well, consider 10 from Maryland:1. Paul S. Sarbanes, born of Greek immigrant parents, educated in the public schools of Maryland's Eastern Shore, made it on his record to Princeton, where he won a Rhodes Scholarship.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 3, 2007
Home is not where your grandparents are buried but where your children are born. Muslim Americans, a majority of which were born in another country, should start looking at America as their very own country. They really need to invest and feel a part of America." - REP. KEITH ELLISON, a Minnesota Democrat, urging his fellow Muslims to become more engaged in American civic life; Mr. Ellison became the first Muslim elected to Congress in 2006
NEWS
By Jonathan Tilove and Jonathan Tilove,Newhouse News Service | January 7, 2007
Washington -- The new Congress includes, for the first time, a Muslim, two Buddhists, more Jews than Episcopalians and the highest-ranking Mormon in congressional history. Roman Catholics remain the largest single faith group in Congress, accounting for 29 percent of all members of the House and Senate, followed by Baptists, Methodists, Presbyterians, Jews and Episcopalians. While Catholics in Congress are nearly 2-to-1 Democrats, the most lopsidedly Democratic groups are Jews and those not affiliated with any religion.
NEWS
By Joel Havemann and Joel Havemann,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Virgil H. Goode Jr., a Virginia Republican, yesterday stood by his demand for strict immigration controls that he said would prevent Muslims from being elected to Congress and using the Quran during swearing-in ceremonies. Islamic groups in the United States called on Republicans to repudiate Goode's remarks, which he first made in a letter attacking the use of the holy book in an unofficial ceremonial oath-taking next month by the first Muslim elected to the House. "I do not apologize and I do not retract my letter," Goode said emphatically during a session yesterday with reporters in the southern Virginia town of Rocky Mount.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 7, 2005
Asked how she hoped to be remembered, Shirley Chisholm, the trailblazing former congresswoman who died last month at age 80, said: "I would like them to say that Shirley Chisholm had guts." If Chisholm '72 - Unbought & Unbossed, a PBS documentary on her life and career that airs tonight, shows anything, it's that she was indeed one brave woman. With the assassinations of other liberal politicians and black leaders, including Sen. Robert Kennedy and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., still fresh in American memory, Chisholm, the first black woman elected to Congress, boldly ran for president in 1972.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | January 6, 2005
WASHINGTON -- A lot of us who remember her owe a debt to the late Shirley Chisholm. She taught us how to stick to principles, even when our friends think we're a pain in the neck. As warm praise deservedly accompanies the condolences for Ms. Chisholm, who died Saturday in Florida at age 80, I remember a time when the first black woman to be elected to Congress and the first to wage a major presidential campaign was not greeted as warmly as today's tributes sound. Coming from some lips, the glowing praise for her courage, her individualism, her tenacity and her "relentless activism" sounds like a nice way of saying that she could be, well, a pain in the neck.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2004
For Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, one of the defining moments of his tenure in Congress came two years ago. That's when Cummings -- a Democrat who is seeking re-election to Maryland's 7th Congressional District, which he has represented since 1996 -- joined about a third of his House colleagues in opposing a resolution authorizing the use of force in Iraq because of concerns he had about the necessity and funding of the war. "People of the 7th need somebody...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 8, 1993
Robert Taft Jr., a former U.S. representative and senator who was the grandson of a president and the son of a presidential contender, died Monday at Jewish Hospital in Cincinnati. He was 76.The Cincinnati Enquirer said he had a stroke on Nov. 29.The scion of a wealthy Ohio family that helped define Republican politics in the United States for more than a century, he never sought to follow his grandfather's or father's quests for the White House.He was the great-grandson of Alphonso Taft, who served as attorney general and as secretary of war under President Ulysses S. Grant in 1876; the grandson of William Howard Taft, who was president of the United States from 1909 to 1913 and chief justice of the United States from 1921 to 1930, and the son of Sen. Robert A. Taft of Ohio, who unsuccessfully sought the Republican nomination for president in 1948 and again in 1952.
NEWS
August 26, 1998
Floyd Haskell, 82, a former U.S. senator from Colorado whose opposition to the Vietnam War propelled him to office in 1972, died yesterday.He died of pneumonia while vacationing in Maine with his wife, Nina Totenberg, legal affairs correspondent for National Public Radio and ABC's "Nightline," said ABC correspondent Cokie Roberts, a family friend.Mr. Haskell, who switched from the Republican Party to the Democratic Party because of his opposition to the war, was elected to the Senate in 1972 and served one term before being defeated.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - Republican congressional leaders closed ranks yesterday behind GOP presidential nominee George W. Bush, suggesting they may be willing to support him if he calls upon Congress to overturn the results of his contest with Vice President Al Gore. After a Florida Supreme Court ruling Tuesday that seemed to favor Gore, GOP lawmakers joined Bush in criticizing the court for overstepping its bounds and signaled a willingness to resist efforts to resolve the disputed election in a manner they do not consider legitimate.
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