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NEWS
June 3, 2013
Seeing the article with the folks in Cherry Hill who prayed for the baby is heartbreaking ("Cherry Hill community asks for peace," May 30). Your paper refuses to address the real issues however. Violence is out of control in America. The Los Angeles Times quit tracking murders back in December, 2012. Try and find statistics from Chicago beyond piecemeal neighborhood incidents. Leadership in America consists of a bunch of jaded, power thirsty and criminally negligent talking heads that say whatever it takes to get elected and continually preen for their next election and post-government career.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
A veteran defense attorney running an independent campaign for Baltimore state's attorney was dealt a significant setback Friday when elections officials determined that he did not collect enough signatures to appear on the November ballot. Russell A. Neverdon Sr. fell more than 1,000 signatures short of the 4,160 needed to challenge Democrat Marilyn J. Mosby, a city official said. Neverdon said he will appeal the decision to Baltimore Circuit Court and, failing that, would consider running a write-in campaign for the job. "This fight has not ended by any stretch of the imagination," Neverdon said outside the offices of the Baltimore City Board of Elections.
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SPORTS
January 31, 2013
It almost makes you laugh. Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger says that the situation at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs in Baltimore "is and has been unacceptable for years" ("Officials demand answers from VA," Jan 29). Well, if it has been that way, then where has he, and U.S. Sens. Barbara Mikulski and Ben Cardin been? They claim to be so concerned but have apparently paid little interest In the complaints by the veterans. The situation could be fixed by firing everyone in that office and replacing them with serious, concerned individuals who obviously care about our vets.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
The National Federation of the Blind has sued Maryland election officials, charging that their April decision not to approve a system that would make it easier for disabled people to cast absentee ballots privately violates federal law. The Baltimore-based federation filed suit this week asking the U.S. District Court to order the State Board of Elections to provide that technology in time for the June 24 primary election. "The right to a secret ballot that can be filled out privately and independently is just as important to people with disabilities as it is for other voters," said federation spokesman Chris Danielson.
NEWS
February 4, 2014
Saying it was inspired by his own run-ins with alcohol and the law, Del. Donald H. Dwyer Jr. has introduced legislation that would require jail time and rehab for public officials convicted of drunken driving and would subject legislators to removal from office if they're jailed for any offense. "Clearly, we should be held to a higher standard," said Dwyer, an Anne Arundel County Republican. The three-term delegate is serving 30 weekends in jail after being convicted of drunken driving in October.
NEWS
March 7, 1991
The 1991 "Guide to Elected Officials" produced by Baltimore's League of Women Voters is now available.The free guide lists national, state and city elected officials, their addresses and telephone numbers. The guide also lists the dates the officials' terms expire.Copies of the guide are available in league offices, at 2318 N. Charles St., or by sending a self-addressed, stamped envelope to that address.The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan organization that encourages citizens to participate in government.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | September 6, 1995
After months of feuding over the school budget, Baltimore County politicians and education officials emerged from a closed-door summit yesterday to pledge a new era of goodwill.Nothing but smiles and vows of cooperation were evident after the unusual 80-minute luncheon meeting, which included all seven county councilmen.Dr. Anthony G. Marchione, the acting school superintendent, promised to work closely with the county to solve the school system's money problems and said he would not ignore elected officials' budget decisions and fiscal limits next year.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 4, 1997
Four of Maryland's federal elected officials have asked the government to call in outside help to investigate the mysterious problems that sent dozens of people to the hospital during the past few weeks at the George H. Fallon Federal Building.The letter signed by the four Democrats -- U.S. Sens. Paul S. Sarbanes and Barbara A. Mikulski, 3rd District Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin and 7th District Rep. Elijah E. Cummings -- also asks the building's federal landlord, the General Services Administration, to tap local experts in occupational and environmental medicine from the University of Maryland Medical School and the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1995
Anne Arundel County should discontinue the retirement benefits it offers part-time elected officials, a member of the County Council said yesterday.James E. "Ed" DeGrange, a Glen Burnie Democrat, said he will draft legislation with the aid of an eight-member panel to remove the five newest council members, including himself, from the county's pension system.The legislation, which may not be ready for a year, also would prevent future council members from entering the system, Mr. DeGrange said.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | December 28, 2008
Unlike county elected officials who recently received automatic raises, state legislators have not had a pay increase since the 2006 election. Still, they're being asked to make a sacrifice just the same. State Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch have asked General Assembly members to give up a slice of their annual pay as a gesture of solidarity with state workers, who face two to five days of unpaid furlough as a cost-cutting measure. Elected officials can't be furloughed, and also can't change their annual pay while in office.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
How easy it is to rail against the salaries of elected officials. Embedded deeply in the human psyche is the near-certainty that somewhere, somehow the people who hold public office are getting away with unarmed robbery. It's a suspicion that's easy to play on, while proving the reverse — that a taxpayer-financed pay raise might actually be overdue and a worthy investment — is a tough sell under the best of circumstances. And while we can't argue that everyone who holds such positions deserves their pay, what we do know is that the General Assembly Compensation Commission makes a good case for why Maryland's elected leaders ought to be paid more beginning next year.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
I consider myself to be a very concerned and loyal citizen who takes time to study all the issues related to each specific election and make sound decisions that will guide our country in the direction that statesmen such as Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and others would have wanted. These statesmen and their constituents supported each other's dream of creating a strong nation for all future generations. But now I am worried for my country because of the military reduction plan being initiated by President Barack Obama and blessed and executed by Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel ( "A smaller, more nimble force," Feb. 26)
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis and The Record | February 27, 2014
In voting to give themselves (or whoever replaces them in November 2015) a raise, the mayor and three members of the Aberdeen City Council made a drastic mistake. They should have either rejected the legislation increasing their annual pay from $10,000 to $15,000 for the mayor and from $7,500 to $10,000 for council members, or they should have increased the rate of pay for elected officials to the level of full time salary with benefits. For more than a year, Mayor Mike Bennett and council members Sandy Landbeck, Bruce Garner and Ruth Ann Young have been making the argument that a pay increase is needed because the job is so demanding.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
Del. Don H. Dwyer Jr., convicted twice of alcohol-related offenses over the past two years, urged fellow lawmakers Wednesday to approve his bill requiring mandatory minimum sentences for officials convicted of drunken driving. The Anne Arundel County Republican was one of two witnesses in favor of the bill at a hearing before the House Judiciary Committee. He argued that elected officials who violate the law should be punished more severely than ordinary citizens. "You are held to a higher standard, and you are not an average Joe," was the message the judge in Dwyer's case delivered to him, the lawmaker told the committee.
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | February 24, 2014
Tonight Maryland Public Television will their new documentary "Marvin Mandel: A Complicated Life," taking a look at our 56th governor. I received an advanced copy from MPT and watched it over the weekend and can tell you that it is certainly worth waching.   The piece takes a look at Mandel's rise, from a young man who wanted to be a major league ballplayer, through law school and his selection to be a part of Baltimore's Democratic machine, and then his ascension as governor.
NEWS
February 4, 2014
Saying it was inspired by his own run-ins with alcohol and the law, Del. Donald H. Dwyer Jr. has introduced legislation that would require jail time and rehab for public officials convicted of drunken driving and would subject legislators to removal from office if they're jailed for any offense. "Clearly, we should be held to a higher standard," said Dwyer, an Anne Arundel County Republican. The three-term delegate is serving 30 weekends in jail after being convicted of drunken driving in October.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2004
The departing Baltimore City Council, with its seven lame-duck members, is expected to begin consideration today of a proposal to give pay raises to all of the city's elected officials. The legislation, set to be introduced by Councilman Robert W. Curran, calls for a 6 percent salary increase for the new 14-member council, its president Sheila Dixon, Comptroller Joan M. Pratt and Mayor Martin O'Malley. The pay raise would be the first for the city's elected officials in five years. In December 1999, the departing council approved salary increases ranging between 23 percent and 32 percent, which benefited the current council, as well as Dixon, Pratt and O'Malley.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | January 27, 1993
An article in yesterday's Carroll County edition incorrectly implied that the Westminster City Council delayed discussing a proposal to have a citizens committee study the pay and benefits of elected officials. The proposal for a pay study was defeated Monday night.5) The Baltimore Sun regrets the errors.Two Westminster council members who opposed a plan to study the pay and benefits of elected officials said the issue can be discussed when the economy improves.The council divided 2-2 on the proposal at its Monday night meeting.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
The City Council decided Monday to launch an investigation into the secret audit of Baltimore's speed camera system that found error rates much higher than officials have claimed publicly. "People in the city of Baltimore are losing faith in us as elected officials," said City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young. "We have to make sure that we restore their faith. Right now, people are very frustrated. " The Baltimore Sun reported last week the findings of a never-released audit that showed the city's speed cameras likely charged motorists for thousands more erroneous tickets than previously disclosed.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Each February, Larry White helps young people transform themselves into Rosa Parks, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights leaders to share stories of African-American history with others in Anne Arundel County. These days, White is busy planning his third annual Black History Month program, which he hopes will attract 200 people eager to learn not only about the past, but about how black leaders influence current events. "We don't just put on a show. We dig down so people can make a difference," said White, a Glen Burnie resident who holds two jobs in addition to his volunteer work.
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