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By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | December 22, 1993
The County Council has decided to fix the financially troubled pension fund for elected and appointed officials by switching, at the recommendation of the Pension Oversight Commission, to a plan that pays benefits based on employee contributions rather than years of service.The commission, a panel of citizens and representatives of county employee unions, had earlier recommended approval of a plan devised by County Executive Robert R. Neall that would have merged the plan for elected and appointed officials with the financially healthy fund for general county employees.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Larry Carson and Liz F. Kay and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
State transportation officials have put a $200 million price tag on widening nine miles of Route 32 to Howard's rural west, reviving hopes that the project, which has lain dormant for nearly a decade, may go forward. County Executive James N. Robey and members of the state delegation said the work on Route 32, designed to ease congestion on the road where it narrows to two lanes between Route 108 and Interstate 70, will be expensive. But they agreed that it has to be done. Robey listed the project third on Howard's list of transportation priorities for state funding for next year, behind improvements to U.S. 1 and U.S. 29. After a meeting with transportation officials Thursday night in an annual session to discuss local projects, Robey said he wasn't surprised by the high cost and that the unsafe conditions warrant the change.
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NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | September 5, 1995
Aides to Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary are drafting legislation that would slash the retirement benefits for elected and appointed officials -- including those already retired.Mr. Gary will unveil the legislation, which is expected to save the county about $3 million, during a 10 a.m. press conference tomorrow, according to a high-level source within the administration.If approved by the County Council, Mr. Gary's legislation would repeal a controversial 1989 law that allowed elected and appointed officials to begin drawing pension benefits at age 50, the source said.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 29, 1996
Water and sewer fees for a Baltimore household would increase 19 percent -- or an average of about $60 a year -- under a rate increase proposed by the city.The proposed increase, the first in four years, affects commercial and industrial as well as residential customers. If approved by the city's top elected and appointed officials, it would take effect April 1.The cost of water the city sells to Anne Arundel, Baltimore and Howard counties also would rise. However, it's not known what effect this will have on rates paid by residents.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | September 17, 1993
County Executive Robert R. Neall has drafted legislation to merge the financially troubled pension fund for elected and appointed officials with the general employees pension fund and to freeze benefits for current officials.The bill, to be introduced to the County Council Monday night, also will double the contribution for those who transfer to the general fund to 8 percent of their salary. Any future elected or appointed officials must join the employees pension fund.Adding to the pension reform fray, Council Chairman David G. Boschert said he will introduce a bill of his own Monday to prohibit future council members from collecting a county pension.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | July 6, 1993
A revised critical areas law that closes loopholes for subdivisions approved before 1985 will get a second hearing tonight before the County Council.The new law, which received the approval of several county environmental groups at a public hearing two weeks ago, attempts to address the concerns of the state Critical Areas Commission.Last month, the state commission imposed a 90-day moratorium on new grading permits in the critical areas, which include the county's shoreline and wetlands.
NEWS
By JOHN A. MORRIS and JOHN A. MORRIS,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1995
A 1989 law to enhance retirement benefits for appointed and elected officials in Anne Arundel County was a deliberate "grab" by those in power at the time, aides to County Executive John G. Gary said last night.They urged the County Council to approve a reform bill proposed by Mr. Gary to strip those benefits from 58 current and former employees. The bill was scheduled for a vote late last night."We're not talking about people who were in the merit system," said County Attorney Phillip Scheibe.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
A pension oversight group voted unanimously last night to oppose County Executive John G. Gary's plan to cut retroactively the retirement benefits of 44 current and former public officials.Deborah Turner, chairman of the Pension Oversight Commission, said the panel will recommend that the County Council reject proposed legislation that contains the plan. The commission is an appointed panel of citizens and government employees with advisory powers.The council could vote on the plan, which Mr. Gary says will save county taxpayers $4 million, on Oct. 16.The legislation would repeal a portion of a 1989 law enhancing the retirement benefits of elected and appointed officials.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns and Michael K. Burns,Staff writer | March 8, 1992
Because local funding now makes up more than half the county school budget, state Sen. Habern W. Freeman Jr. believes Harford school board members should be chosen locally instead of being appointed by the governor."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | October 19, 1993
The Anne Arundel County Council took up pension reform last night, considering three bills that would save the county millions of dollars in pension benefits for future employees.Although the council took no final action, it did approve several amendments to a bill that would make it more expensive for county employees to transfer service credits from other governments.Among the amendments is a proposal that would require five years of county employment before someone could benefit from the years worked in another government.
NEWS
By JOHN A. MORRIS and JOHN A. MORRIS,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1995
A 1989 law to enhance retirement benefits for appointed and elected officials in Anne Arundel County was a deliberate "grab" by those in power at the time, aides to County Executive John G. Gary said last night.They urged the County Council to approve a reform bill proposed by Mr. Gary to strip those benefits from 58 current and former employees. The bill was scheduled for a vote late last night."We're not talking about people who were in the merit system," said County Attorney Phillip Scheibe.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1995
A pension oversight group voted unanimously last night to oppose County Executive John G. Gary's plan to cut retroactively the retirement benefits of 44 current and former public officials.Deborah Turner, chairman of the Pension Oversight Commission, said the panel will recommend that the County Council reject proposed legislation that contains the plan. The commission is an appointed panel of citizens and government employees with advisory powers.The council could vote on the plan, which Mr. Gary says will save county taxpayers $4 million, on Oct. 16.The legislation would repeal a portion of a 1989 law enhancing the retirement benefits of elected and appointed officials.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1995
Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary unveiled a package of proposals yesterday aimed at curbing the county's growing personnel costs, including a plan to roll back the retirement benefits of 44 current and former elected and appointed officials.The administration will introduce legislation to the County Council Sept. 18 to repeal a controversial 1989 law that substantially enhanced the pensions for political appointees and lowered the retirement age from 60 to 50 for appointees and elected officials, Mr. Gary said during a news conference in Annapolis.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | September 5, 1995
Aides to Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary are drafting legislation that would slash the retirement benefits for elected and appointed officials -- including those already retired.Mr. Gary will unveil the legislation, which is expected to save the county about $3 million, during a 10 a.m. press conference tomorrow, according to a high-level source within the administration.If approved by the County Council, Mr. Gary's legislation would repeal a controversial 1989 law that allowed elected and appointed officials to begin drawing pension benefits at age 50, the source said.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1994
Theodore J. Sophocleus, a Democratic county executive candidate, defended his $400-a-month county pension yesterday during a debate at the Arnold Senior Center.At the same time, the former county councilman, who voted in 1989 to sweeten his pension, lashed out at rival Robert Agee.Mr. Sophocleus said Mr. Agee is attempting to escape responsibility for his role in the pension vote.Mr. Agee was chief aide to former County Executive O. James Lighthizer, whose administration proposed lowering the retirement age from 60 to 50 and increasing benefits for elected and appointed officials in the plan.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1994
In January, the County Council fixed a financially troubled pension plan for elected and appointed officials by reducing benefits that were increased in 1989.Now, the council must decide whether to roll back those lucrative benefits.The council is considering one bill that would reduce pensions of officials who have retired and another that would make them pay back their higher benefits with interest. Meanwhile, the county's Pensions Oversight Commission wants to decrease the benefits of five former and current county officials it believes were responsible for the 1989 law."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1994
In January, the County Council fixed a financially troubled pension plan for elected and appointed officials by reducing benefits that were increased in 1989.Now, the council must decide whether to roll back those lucrative benefits.The council is considering one bill that would reduce pensions of officials who have retired and another that would make them pay back their higher benefits with interest. Meanwhile, the county's Pensions Oversight Commission wants to decrease the benefits of five former and current county officials it believes were responsible for the 1989 law."
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1995
Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary unveiled a package of proposals yesterday aimed at curbing the county's growing personnel costs, including a plan to roll back the retirement benefits of 44 current and former elected and appointed officials.The administration will introduce legislation to the County Council Sept. 18 to repeal a controversial 1989 law that substantially enhanced the pensions for political appointees and lowered the retirement age from 60 to 50 for appointees and elected officials, Mr. Gary said during a news conference in Annapolis.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | December 22, 1993
The County Council has decided to fix the financially troubled pension fund for elected and appointed officials by switching, at the recommendation of the Pension Oversight Commission, to a plan that pays benefits based on employee contributions rather than years of service.The commission, a panel of citizens and representatives of county employee unions, had earlier recommended approval of a plan devised by County Executive Robert R. Neall that would have merged the plan for elected and appointed officials with the financially healthy fund for general county employees.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | October 19, 1993
The Anne Arundel County Council took up pension reform last night, considering three bills that would save the county millions of dollars in pension benefits for future employees.Although the council took no final action, it did approve several amendments to a bill that would make it more expensive for county employees to transfer service credits from other governments.Among the amendments is a proposal that would require five years of county employment before someone could benefit from the years worked in another government.
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