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NEWS
October 24, 2006
On October 19, 2006, RAYMOND W. Survived by loving wife, Lucretia; sons, Raymond Jr.(Charie), Guy S. Eldredge and Thomas Greenleaf; daughters, Rayvelle Barney of TN., Cynthia Allison, Ramone W. Pulley( Manuel) of VA., and Evelyn Eldredge, twelve grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild and a host of other family and friends. Friends may call the WYLIE FUNERAL HOME P.A., of BALTIMORE COUNTY, 9200 Liberty Road on Tuesday from 6 to 8 P.M. Services Wednesday St. Bernadine's Roman Catholic Church, 3812 Edmondson Avenue.
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NEWS
November 4, 2007
Peggy Lee Eldredge, a retired registered nurse, died Monday of pancreatic cancer at her Monkton residence. She was 70. Born Peggy Lee Schoepflin in Baltimore, she attended the old Eastern High School and in 1957 graduated from Church Home and Hospital School of Nursing. She went to work as a nurse for the Salvation Army's Camp Puh'Tok in Monkton, where her first patient was Robert W. Eldredge, who had been thrown from a mule, the family recalled. The couple married Oct. 5, 1958. In the mid-1960s, Mrs. Eldredge began working at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, where she served in several departments, including the emergency room and the recovery room.
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | March 9, 1995
BIRMINGHAM, England -- Todd Eldredge was a skating star at 18 and a has-been at 22.Now, he just might wind up a world champion at 23.Yesterday, Eldredge led a North American assault and grabbed hold of the World Championships with a 2-minute, 40-second technical program that was figure skating's version of a slam dunk.He jumped without fear. He swayed to the music from the film "Swing Kids." He claimed first place and took a giant leap toward tonight's free-skate final, worth two-thirds of the overall score.
NEWS
October 24, 2006
On October 19, 2006, RAYMOND W. Survived by loving wife, Lucretia; sons, Raymond Jr.(Charie), Guy S. Eldredge and Thomas Greenleaf; daughters, Rayvelle Barney of TN., Cynthia Allison, Ramone W. Pulley( Manuel) of VA., and Evelyn Eldredge, twelve grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild and a host of other family and friends. Friends may call the WYLIE FUNERAL HOME P.A., of BALTIMORE COUNTY, 9200 Liberty Road on Tuesday from 6 to 8 P.M. Services Wednesday St. Bernadine's Roman Catholic Church, 3812 Edmondson Avenue.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Writer | October 29, 1994
PITTSBURGH -- They are coming from different directions, but figure skaters Michelle Kwan and Todd Eldredge are trying to get to the same place.Kwan, barely 14 years old, is America's top-rated woman, but she has yet to prove it. Eldredge, 23, is a two-time defending national champion, but he wants to prove it again.They have come to Sudafed Skate America International at the Civic Arena to open the 1994-95 season and prepare for the U.S. Figure Skating Championships in February.No doubt, Kwan will be a solid favorite at the nationals in Providence, R.I., regardless of what happens here, but the circumstances of her No. 1 rating -- which came with the U.S. Figure Skating Association's decision to dethrone 1993 champion Tonya Harding -- will make it a hollow position until she backs it up with a first-place finish.
NEWS
November 4, 2007
Peggy Lee Eldredge, a retired registered nurse, died Monday of pancreatic cancer at her Monkton residence. She was 70. Born Peggy Lee Schoepflin in Baltimore, she attended the old Eastern High School and in 1957 graduated from Church Home and Hospital School of Nursing. She went to work as a nurse for the Salvation Army's Camp Puh'Tok in Monkton, where her first patient was Robert W. Eldredge, who had been thrown from a mule, the family recalled. The couple married Oct. 5, 1958. In the mid-1960s, Mrs. Eldredge began working at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, where she served in several departments, including the emergency room and the recovery room.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | February 12, 1992
ALBERTVILLE, France -- He stands on the ice, his head bowed, his eyes closed, his Winter Olympics debut already turning into a nightmare.He misses one triple jump. And then another. He twists two revolutions instead of three. His breath comes in short gasps.And this is only practice.What about tomorrow night? When the whole world is watching When the judges begin shaping a list of medal contenders. When the top men's figure skaters square off in a triple-jump exhibition.This isn't the Olympics of Todd Eldredge's dreams.
SPORTS
By George White and George White,Orlando Sentinel | January 9, 1992
ORLANDO, Fla. -- America's leading man of skate, Todd Eldredge, may be taking his Olympic fate off his skates and casting it in the hands of a jury of 40. A painful back injury threatens to knock him out of the U.S. Figure Skating Championships, casting a shadow over his chances of making the U.S. Olympic team.Eldredge was the highest-ranked U.S. male at the 1991 World Championships in Munich, Germany, finishing third, which would establish him as America's best chance for a medal at Albertville, France.
SPORTS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 3, 1998
MINNEAPOLIS -- Todd Eldredge leaves for professional skating without an Olympic medal or a second world title, but with the enormous satisfaction of having brought a Target Center crowd of 10,027 to its feet by battling his way to a silver medal at the figure skating world championships last night.As the five-time U.S. champion became a five-time world medalist, Russia's Alexei Yagudin, 18, was becoming the second-youngest world champion, despite losing the long program to Eldredge."This was not my best skating," Yagudin said.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1997
LAUSANNE, Switzerland -- The quad.It's one jump and four revolutions, the all-or-nothing leap most likely to decide the men's title at this year's World Figure Skating Championships."
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2001
With slightly more than two months remaining before the start of the Winter Olympics, athletes are deep into the competitions that will determine who will go to Salt Lake City. Also on the way to Utah is the Olympic torch, which was lighted Monday in Olympia, Greece, the site of the first Games, and will reach the United States on Dec. 4. The flame will be carried through 46 states - with a stop in Baltimore on Dec. 22 - by 11,500 volunteers, each of whom will carry the torch two-tenths of a mile.
SPORTS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 3, 1998
MINNEAPOLIS -- Todd Eldredge leaves for professional skating without an Olympic medal or a second world title, but with the enormous satisfaction of having brought a Target Center crowd of 10,027 to its feet by battling his way to a silver medal at the figure skating world championships last night.As the five-time U.S. champion became a five-time world medalist, Russia's Alexei Yagudin, 18, was becoming the second-youngest world champion, despite losing the long program to Eldredge."This was not my best skating," Yagudin said.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 15, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- Todd Eldredge began this journey as a kid in hockey skates on Cape Cod in Massachusetts. He liked to spin and jump, and soon, he followed a coach and a dream across America.He followed his coach, Richard Callaghan, through rinks in Philadelphia, San Diego, Colorado Springs, Colo., and Detroit. He rehearsed two decades for this one moment that was supposed to end in gold.Instead, Eldredge finished the 1998 Winter Olympics in failure yesterday. He was fourth in the men's figure skating final and he was out of the medals.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | February 13, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- The way it looks now, Todd Eldredge will not attempt a quadruple jump in his long program, even if it costs him the Olympic gold medal.His decision would run contrary to the "go-for-it" spirit that American sports fans seek in their Olympians. His decision would draw sharp criticism if he loses by the narrowest of margins.But know this:It would be the right decision for Todd Eldredge.He needs to be comfortable. He needs to go with what got him to this point. He needs to ignore the casual figure skating fans who turn into experts every four years.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 11, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- Todd Eldredge sees the Winter Olympics, and he thinks of John Elway.Elway was a great performer who could only confirm his greatness by winning the Super Bowl for the Denver Broncos. And here's Eldredge, in the same career spot, owning every title figure skating can offer but one, the Olympic gold."It's time to show people," Eldredge said. "I want to do my stuff like John Elway. A gold would make it great. A silver would be OK, too. But I want to win."Tomorrow, Eldredge will finally skate and begin his last Olympic stand in the men's short program.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1998
PHILADELPHIA -- Michael Weiss made history and stole the spotlight last night here at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships. But he didn't quite land his biggest jump or his biggest prize.Weiss became the first male skater to attempt a quad Lutz at a major championship and, just as he did on his quad toe loop at last year's nationals, narrowly missed making a clean jump.This time, videotape replays weren't needed to see that Weiss two-footed the jump. But they were used anyway to just make sure.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1997
LAUSANNE, Switzerland -- Dan Hollander's World Figure Skating Championships lasted 4 minutes, 30 seconds.Third in America, Hollander couldn't even crack the top 30 needed to advance from yesterday's men's qualifying round. He missed a few jumps. He spun out of a few landings. And then, he was gone, 18th in his qualifying group, sidelined with a bunch of other also-rans.Afterward, Hollander, a 5-foot-2, 24-year-old with a passion for martial arts, reviewed the faults of his program and finally said, "Oh, my God. You're making me relive this."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1998
PHILADELPHIA -- As Michael Weiss walked over from the hotel to the CoreStates Center for his afternoon skate yesterday, he wore a big smile on his face.When his wife, Lisa, asked what he was smiling about, Weiss said, "This is what everybody has been talking about for the past 13 years, since the first time I was asked, 'Do you want to go to the Olympics?' "Weiss, 21, took a big step last night toward being one of the two male skaters to represent the United States in Nagano, Japan, next month by overcoming what had been a significant career obstacle.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1998
PHILADELPHIA -- As Michael Weiss walked over from the hotel to the CoreStates Center for his afternoon skate yesterday, he wore a big smile on his face.When his wife, Lisa, asked what he was smiling about, Weiss said, "This is what everybody has been talking about for the past 13 years, since the first time I was asked, 'Do you want to go to the Olympics?' "Weiss, 21, took a big step last night toward being one of the two male skaters to represent the United States in Nagano, Japan, next month by overcoming what had been a significant career obstacle.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1997
LAUSANNE, Switzerland -- For 15 seconds, nothing. Just a guy dressed in black standing motionless while music from the motion picture "Dragonheart" boomed through a tiny arena.And then, Canada's Elvis Stojko went to work. The little skater with the big jumps brought fearlessness and fury to the World Figure Skating Championships, hitting the quad and eight triples to grab the men's crown for the third time in four years last night.Stojko leaped from fourth to first in a heart-pounding long program production that should have been labeled an art-free zone.
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