Advertisement
HomeCollectionsElderly Housing
IN THE NEWS

Elderly Housing

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1999
A federal judge ruled yesterday that Baltimore housing officials have the right to move ahead with plans to replace the troubled Hollander Ridge public housing complex, which has been at the center of a three-year legal fight.City housing chief Daniel P. Henson III wants to turn the 1,000-unit development, which is deteriorating and overrun with crime, into a gated retirement village. The plan has been challenged by attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Union, who say the city is reneging on its promise to provide quality homes for families.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 6, 2006
At a time when the nation's elderly population is growing and is projected to skyrocket in the next 25 years, government should be focusing on expanding programs for the elderly, not shrinking them. Yet a Bush administration budget proposal would do just that by cutting spending on a popular federal program that pays for construction and rehabilitation of housing for low-income seniors. The administration is overlooking two simple but important facts: One-fourth of elderly U.S. households have annual incomes of less than $10,000 a year, and rents are rising in many parts of the country.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 2, 1996
OVER THE NEXT quarter-century, Howard County's elderly population is expected to increase two-and-a-half times over what it is now. In fact, statewide, the number of residents 65 or older is expected to grow from one in 10 in 1990 to one in six by the year 2020. Thus, the need for additional housing to accommodate this growing sector should be apparent -- or must become so.There has been notable opposition to a half-dozen elderly complexes being planned around Howard County. Residents fear traffic and depressed property values.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
The Harford County Council will hold a hearing Tuesday night on a bill seeking a 90-day moratorium on the construction of housing for the elderly. The panel wants to determine whether developers are using the housing designation to circumvent a law limiting residential growth in crowded school districts. "There has been a flurry of activity in the development of housing for the elderly in recent months," said Councilman Robert G. Cassilly, a Republican representing the Bel Air area. "Is the objective to serve the needs of the elderly, or are developers doing this to get around the law and get new houses on the market?
BUSINESS
February 18, 1996
Solar council plans building workshopThe Passive Solar Industries Council is holding a homebuilding workshop from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday."Architects, homebuilders, and homebuyers routinely overlook numerous opportunities to reduce energy consumption and save dollars during the design phase," said workshop instructor William G. Reed, AIA, managing principal-Washington of the Hillier Group.The workshop will examine how natural elements such as sunlight, breezes and landscaping can be used with "green" building techniques to design a home that will provide significant energy savings and comfort.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
The Harford County Council will hold a hearing Tuesday night on a bill seeking a 90-day moratorium on the construction of housing for the elderly. The panel wants to determine whether developers are using the housing designation to circumvent a law limiting residential growth in overcrowded school districts. "There has been a flurry of activity in the development of housing for the elderly in recent months," said Councilman Robert G. Cassilly, a Republican representing the Bel Air area.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1997
Two developers got different answers last week when they asked the Howard County Planning Board to amend the county's zoning regulations to accommodate their projects.The board denied a petition from developer Hugo Procopio to lower the qualifying age for elderly housing residents from 60 to 50.Procopio is building a 19-unit condominium complex for the elderly called Lilac Park on Whiskey Bottom Road in North Laurel and says he has a waiting list of about 40 people between 50 and 59 years old.Because the Lilac Park project falls under the county's Housing for the Elderly zoning regulations, residents must be at least 60 years old. Procopio said he wants to meet the need in the county -- and guarantee full capacity for his complex -- by lowering the age requirement.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
The Harford County Council will hold a hearing Tuesday night on a bill seeking a 90-day moratorium on the construction of housing for the elderly. The panel wants to determine whether developers are using the housing designation to circumvent a law limiting residential growth in crowded school districts. "There has been a flurry of activity in the development of housing for the elderly in recent months," said Councilman Robert G. Cassilly, a Republican representing the Bel Air area. "Is the objective to serve the needs of the elderly, or are developers doing this to get around the law and get new houses on the market?
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1995
The Howard County Planning Board last week approved plans to build 89 units of housing for the elderly in the Village of Hickory Ridge, despite protests from four nearby homeowners.The plans still must be approved by the Howard County Board of Appeals, another land-use body."From a selfish standpoint, I don't want the value of my house to go down," said Marc Fineman, who has lived on Owen Brown Road for 12 years. "I want to see the value go up."Mr. Fineman said that he is concerned that the development will create too much storm water runoff into the neighborhood and that elderly people will not move into the units.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2000
Plans to build a low-income elderly housing development at the site of the recently demolished Hollander Ridge public housing project have been dealt a severe blow by a federal appeals court. In a decision that could mean an end to the proposed development, a three-judge appeals panel unanimously reversed Wednesday an earlier federal court ruling that had given the go-ahead for construction of a 450-unit public housing complex for the elderly in Hollander Ridge. The ruling also affected plans for a senior housing development in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
The Harford County Council will hold a hearing Tuesday night on a bill seeking a 90-day moratorium on the construction of housing for the elderly. The panel wants to determine whether developers are using the housing designation to circumvent a law limiting residential growth in overcrowded school districts. "There has been a flurry of activity in the development of housing for the elderly in recent months," said Councilman Robert G. Cassilly, a Republican representing the Bel Air area.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2003
The winds of change are carrying the prospect of a true renaissance to the former blue- collar bastion of Dundalk, complete with the community's first gated housing development - the Lakes at Stansbury Shores. Private developers are working on two projects. The larger one, Stansbury Shores, is headed by John H. Riehl IV, principal of Obrecht-Riehl Properties of Baltimore. He is crafting a blueprint for an upscale development with up to 50 homes, along with condominiums, a small midrise building for seniors and boat slips off Bear Creek.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2001
Gov. Parris N. Glendening worked yesterday to bridge House and Senate differences over helping senior citizens afford the high cost of prescription drugs, and indicated he is willing to provide state aid to address the problem, according to legislators. "There will be an agreement. There will be a bill," Senate Finance Committee Chairman Thomas L. Bromwell, a Baltimore County Democrat, said after meeting with the governor. Glendening and legislators discussed having the state pitch in $6 million to provide relief from the rising cost of pharmacy-bought medications.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2000
Plans to build a low-income elderly housing development at the site of the recently demolished Hollander Ridge public housing project have been dealt a severe blow by a federal appeals court. In a decision that could mean an end to the proposed development, a three-judge appeals panel unanimously reversed Wednesday an earlier federal court ruling that had given the go-ahead for construction of a 450-unit public housing complex for the elderly in Hollander Ridge. The ruling also affected plans for a senior housing development in Cherry Hill.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
The nonprofit group hoping to redevelop the Memorial Stadium site passed another hurdle this week when its financing plans were approved by Baltimore officials.The Govans Ecumenical Development Corp. (GEDCO), which wants to turn the site into a senior center and YMCA, presented a proposal outlining the financing for the plan to the city Department of Housing and Community Development on Monday.The nonprofit, church-based group won a city government-sponsored competition this year with its proposal to turn the storied stadium site, former home to the Baltimore Colts and Orioles, into a campus including housing for low- and moderate-income senior citizens and a 45,000-square-foot YMCA for all ages.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1999
It wasn't the first place you'd expect to hear a pitch from a developer trying to win a competition for one of the largest available pieces of real estate in Baltimore -- 30 acres of city-owned land including Memorial Stadium.It was Good Friday in Govans Presbyterian Church, and the Rev. John R. Sharp was preaching about the consideration Jesus showed his mother while he was dying on the cross.Sharp, a pastor and president of the Govans Ecumenical Development Corp., said the nonprofit organization's motive for planning the 472-unit Stadium Place retirement community was similar to Jesus' motive in asking a disciple to care for his aging mother.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1996
Senior citizens with moderate incomes, such as those living on Social Security, soon will have a new housing option in Annapolis.An Annapolis nonprofit developer working with a private developer plans to construct a two-building housing complex for the elderly on a 4.8-acre parcel on Edgewood Road behind the Bay Forest Shopping Center. The buildings would house 120 one- and two-bedroom apartments."Annapolis has a great need," said Trudy McFall, chairwoman of Homes for America, the nonprofit developer.
NEWS
March 6, 2006
At a time when the nation's elderly population is growing and is projected to skyrocket in the next 25 years, government should be focusing on expanding programs for the elderly, not shrinking them. Yet a Bush administration budget proposal would do just that by cutting spending on a popular federal program that pays for construction and rehabilitation of housing for low-income seniors. The administration is overlooking two simple but important facts: One-fourth of elderly U.S. households have annual incomes of less than $10,000 a year, and rents are rising in many parts of the country.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1999
A federal judge ruled yesterday that Baltimore housing officials have the right to move ahead with plans to replace the troubled Hollander Ridge public housing complex, which has been at the center of a three-year legal fight.City housing chief Daniel P. Henson III wants to turn the 1,000-unit development, which is deteriorating and overrun with crime, into a gated retirement village. The plan has been challenged by attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Union, who say the city is reneging on its promise to provide quality homes for families.
NEWS
November 12, 1998
AS THE GRAYING of suburbia continues, the need grows for more affordable housing choices for senior citizens. In Howard County, more than 9 percent of the population of 230,000 is older than 60. In the next 25 years that percentage is expected to grow to roughly a quarter of the population, or 73,500 residents. Their incomes will vary, and they will need a range of housing choices as a result.As government officials and developers address the need for more affordable housing overall, they should put emphasis on the needs of retirees and others on fixed income.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.