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Elder Abuse

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NEWS
March 17, 2011
On March 2, actor Mickey Rooney testified before the Senate's Special Committee on Aging describing his experience as a victim of elder abuse, a story that was also recently recounted in The Sun ("Actor Mickey Rooney accuses stepson of abuse," Feb. 15). Mr. Rooney stated that if elder abuse can happen to him, it can happen to anyone. Elder abuse can be physical abuse, but it also can be financial or emotional abuse. Elder abuse happens in all communities. Many people do not realize that elder abuse is occurring in their own families or neighborhoods.
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NEWS
June 15, 2012
June 15 marks the sixth annual World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, established to shed light on the abuse of elderly adults, a problem that is still not widely recognized but has become a concern in communities across the nation. Elder abuse includes physical, emotional, verbal and sexual abuse, as well as neglect and exploitation. With a Baby Boomer population of more than 75 million now entering their retirement years, this problem will soon be one many families must confront. One in 10 adults over the age of 65 have experienced some form of elder abuse.
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NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | May 2, 1993
An elderly Carroll woman who entered a local nursing home to recover from an acute illness thought she would be able to go home when she got better.She got better. But she could not go home."She had no home to go to," said Carol Purkins, Carroll County long-term care ombudsman."The family had sold it."Even in Carroll County, elder abuse is a growing problem, she said.In Maryland, Gov. William Donald Schaefer has proclaimed May 2-8 as Elder Abuse Prevention Week, a time for making people aware of the problem and what they can do about it."
NEWS
March 17, 2011
On March 2, actor Mickey Rooney testified before the Senate's Special Committee on Aging describing his experience as a victim of elder abuse, a story that was also recently recounted in The Sun ("Actor Mickey Rooney accuses stepson of abuse," Feb. 15). Mr. Rooney stated that if elder abuse can happen to him, it can happen to anyone. Elder abuse can be physical abuse, but it also can be financial or emotional abuse. Elder abuse happens in all communities. Many people do not realize that elder abuse is occurring in their own families or neighborhoods.
NEWS
June 15, 2012
June 15 marks the sixth annual World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, established to shed light on the abuse of elderly adults, a problem that is still not widely recognized but has become a concern in communities across the nation. Elder abuse includes physical, emotional, verbal and sexual abuse, as well as neglect and exploitation. With a Baby Boomer population of more than 75 million now entering their retirement years, this problem will soon be one many families must confront. One in 10 adults over the age of 65 have experienced some form of elder abuse.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | November 9, 2004
In Baltimore County `Police Report' to focus on elder abuse, 911 Center TOWSON -- In this month's edition of Police Report on Comcast Channel 25 in Baltimore County, Detective Teresa Krebs and Michael Lehmuth, ombudsman program manager in the Department of Aging, present a five-minute discussion of the problem of elder abuse. In a longer segment, Marie Whisonant, chief of the 911 Center, and Sgt. John Cullum, supervisor of the police liaison at the center, discuss operations of the 911 Center.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | December 29, 1992
A new hot line has opened to take reports of suspected abuse and neglect of the elderly.The hot line is a project of Columbia resident and lawyer Charles Jerome Ware, and the Rev. John L. Wright, of the First Baptist Church of Guilford.Mr. Ware said he became interested in the issue of abuse of the elderly through his work as legal counsel for the Maryland State Conference of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, which develops leadership and political programs. Through that job, he often gets phone calls and letters complaining about problems in the community.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2001
Abuse and neglect are the dark secrets of the elderly. In nursing homes, assisted living facilities and private homes, senior citizens are beaten, robbed and left without proper food or medication, say advocates for the elderly. As a result, the Baltimore County Department of Aging has begun a yearlong campaign to urge more people to report crimes against the elderly and to teach how such acts can be prevented. The campaign - "Elder Abuse Is A Crying Shame" - began this month. The department has publicized it with billboards in Essex and Catonsville and in a brochure with a cover showing a shattered pair of eyeglasses.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2010
As a wills and estate lawyer in Toronto, Les Kotzer has heard it all — and it's not often pretty. Take the story of an ailing, elderly woman who relied on a daughter's caregiving to avoid going to a nursing home. The child threatened to withhold care unless the mother's house was bequeathed to the daughter in a will. The daughter even drove her to a lawyer's office to have the document drawn up. But the mother told Kotzer she got her revenge. When the daughter left for a vacation, the mother called the lawyer to the house to secretly execute a new will that disinherits the child.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2011
From an Annapolis hearing room to a Baltimore courtroom, animal cruelty has captured the attention of Marylanders in recent weeks — and has sparked debate over the issue's importance. Even as Baltimore prosecutors were locked in a lengthy trial over a fatal attack on a pit bull terrier, some critics complained that murders don't get as much media attention as the dog that was set ablaze. And a family friend of the brothers charged in that case questioned the legal system's priorities in prosecuting teens for an attack on an animal when her murdered son's killer hasn't yet been caught.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2011
From an Annapolis hearing room to a Baltimore courtroom, animal cruelty has captured the attention of Marylanders in recent weeks — and has sparked debate over the issue's importance. Even as Baltimore prosecutors were locked in a lengthy trial over a fatal attack on a pit bull terrier, some critics complained that murders don't get as much media attention as the dog that was set ablaze. And a family friend of the brothers charged in that case questioned the legal system's priorities in prosecuting teens for an attack on an animal when her murdered son's killer hasn't yet been caught.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2010
As a wills and estate lawyer in Toronto, Les Kotzer has heard it all — and it's not often pretty. Take the story of an ailing, elderly woman who relied on a daughter's caregiving to avoid going to a nursing home. The child threatened to withhold care unless the mother's house was bequeathed to the daughter in a will. The daughter even drove her to a lawyer's office to have the document drawn up. But the mother told Kotzer she got her revenge. When the daughter left for a vacation, the mother called the lawyer to the house to secretly execute a new will that disinherits the child.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | November 9, 2004
In Baltimore County `Police Report' to focus on elder abuse, 911 Center TOWSON -- In this month's edition of Police Report on Comcast Channel 25 in Baltimore County, Detective Teresa Krebs and Michael Lehmuth, ombudsman program manager in the Department of Aging, present a five-minute discussion of the problem of elder abuse. In a longer segment, Marie Whisonant, chief of the 911 Center, and Sgt. John Cullum, supervisor of the police liaison at the center, discuss operations of the 911 Center.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2001
Abuse and neglect are the dark secrets of the elderly. In nursing homes, assisted living facilities and private homes, senior citizens are beaten, robbed and left without proper food or medication, say advocates for the elderly. As a result, the Baltimore County Department of Aging has begun a yearlong campaign to urge more people to report crimes against the elderly and to teach how such acts can be prevented. The campaign - "Elder Abuse Is A Crying Shame" - began this month. The department has publicized it with billboards in Essex and Catonsville and in a brochure with a cover showing a shattered pair of eyeglasses.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Andrea F. Siegel and Dail Willis and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Caitlin Francke contributed to this article | May 18, 1998
Marion V. Cusimano's was a grotesque case of elderly abuse: crippled by multiple sclerosis, she died of neglect and starvation. Her body remained a year in the back bedroom of the Essex home she owned.National and local experts point to many other cases, ranging from the hurtful to the horrific. An elderly man left unattended in the same bed with his dead wife. A mother battered by her alcoholic son. A 71-year-old woman left in bed for so long that her bedsores became infested with maggots.
NEWS
September 1, 1997
THE CRIMINAL conviction last month of a former Baltimore County counselor for assaulting a disabled older man highlights a largely hidden, and growing, problem. Nationwide, 1.8 million cases of abuse of the elderly and disabled are reported annually. But according to the American Medical Association, only 1 in 14 cases -- 7 percent -- is reported to a public agency.As Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. explains: "Seldom is there a witness. Very often seniors are disoriented and can't be very good witnesses."
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff | September 13, 1990
A former nursing assistant today faces charges of abusing and hitting 24 elderly residents under her care at an Annapolis nursing home.Annapolis police alleged that the assistant roughed up residents of the Annapolis Convalescent Center, including shoving some into wheelchairs and onto beds, between May and August 1990. Most of the victims are in their 80s and 90s.The assistant, Michele OleeGraves, 20, of Annapolis, was scheduled for a bond review hearing before an Annapolis District Court judge today.
NEWS
September 1, 1997
THE CRIMINAL conviction last month of a former Baltimore County counselor for assaulting a disabled older man highlights a largely hidden, and growing, problem. Nationwide, 1.8 million cases of abuse of the elderly and disabled are reported annually. But according to the American Medical Association, only 1 in 14 cases -- 7 percent -- is reported to a public agency.As Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. explains: "Seldom is there a witness. Very often seniors are disoriented and can't be very good witnesses."
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | May 2, 1993
An elderly Carroll woman who entered a local nursing home to recover from an acute illness thought she would be able to go home when she got better.She got better. But she could not go home."She had no home to go to," said Carol Purkins, Carroll County long-term care ombudsman."The family had sold it."Even in Carroll County, elder abuse is a growing problem, she said.In Maryland, Gov. William Donald Schaefer has proclaimed May 2-8 as Elder Abuse Prevention Week, a time for making people aware of the problem and what they can do about it."
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | December 29, 1992
A new hot line has opened to take reports of suspected abuse and neglect of the elderly.The hot line is a project of Columbia resident and lawyer Charles Jerome Ware, and the Rev. John L. Wright, of the First Baptist Church of Guilford.Mr. Ware said he became interested in the issue of abuse of the elderly through his work as legal counsel for the Maryland State Conference of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, which develops leadership and political programs. Through that job, he often gets phone calls and letters complaining about problems in the community.
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