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El Salvador

NEWS
February 11, 1991
The Arias plan, which provided a framework for peace of a sort in Nicaragua, never made it to El Salvador. There, the same principles were repudiated by both right and left. There, the very threat of peace brought a renewal of violence.Peace talks, brokered by United Nations assistant secretary general Alvaro de Soto between the military-backed ARENA government of President Alfredo Cristiani and the left-wing Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front, probably never had a chance. But just in case they did, the FMLN launched an offensive in November.
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NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Mexico City Bureau of The Sun | March 27, 1991
MEXICO CITY -- The Salvadoran government and leftist rebels are to meet here April 4 through April 23 in what is being billed as the final diplomatic "endgame" to halt the 11-year-old civil war, a senior Nicaraguan government official said yesterday.The official, interviewed by telephone, refused to be identified but said, "I think everyone is anxious for an agreement. I have never been more optimistic."Salvador Samayoa, a member of the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front's diplomatic commission here, refused to confirm the dates in an interview yesterday.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | December 9, 1991
San Salvador, El Salvador FOR 11 years, the rightists and the government of this poor, crowded country have waged one of the most brutish and bitter wars in modern history. At least 75,000 Salvadorans have died, often of ghoulish tortures.The United States entered the fray after 1979 with 55 military advisers and hundreds of millions of dollars, which made America the scorn of liberals who saw us as part of these tropical killing fields.So what is happening here is astonishing -- the long bloodletting is winding down to what will almost surely be a peace accord between the rightist government of President Alfredo Cristiani and the Marxists of the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front (FMLN)
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2013
After the U.S. men's national soccer team lost a friendly to Belgium in May, a disgusted coach Jurgen Klinsmann tried to talk about what positives the Americans could get out of the surprising defeat. “I'd rather play Belgium 10 more times than El Salvador for the 100 th time because that's where you learn,” Klinsmann said.  Klinsmann is hopeful that his team, which has won seven straight official games, is not given a similar lesson Sunday when it meets El Salvador in a 4 p.m. quarterfinal of the 2013 CONCACAF Gold Cup at M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Army's top officer has ordered a review to determine whether soldiers who served as advisers in El Salvador should be awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge, a prized medal they claim has been denied them because of politics.Gen. Dennis J. Reimer, the Army chief of staff, ordered a review by the U.S. Army Infantry Center at Fort Benning, Ga. In transmitting the order, the Army cited an Aug. 4 Sun article that detailed the stories of those who came under heavy fire and in some cases died helping the Salvadoran army fight Marxist insurgents.
NEWS
By Tanya Snyder | January 11, 2007
The issue of immigration shook up the country and bedeviled Congress last year, but rarely do we examine the root causes of immigration. Consider El Salvador, which sends more people per capita to the United States than any other country. Up to a third of its population lives outside its borders, most in the United States, and its economy is supported by money those immigrants send back to their families. Even now, almost 15 years to the day after the end of the nation's civil war, people are fleeing for their lives - and their livelihoods - because the once-heralded peace accords have failed to bring peace.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | November 16, 1990
In a service marked by sadness, anger and hope, the local religious community observed the first anniversary of the deaths of the six Jesuit priests who were slain a year ago today in El Salvador.Titled "Martyrs in a Martyred Land," last night's service was held in the chapel of Loyola College, a Jesuit-run school. About 100 people attended.The Greater Baltimore Interfaith Network on Central America organized the event. Comprising Christian and Jewish religious officials and lay people, the network was founded shortly after the Jesuits' assassinations.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 25, 1992
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- A confidential list o Salvadoran officers to be purged from their military posts next month for reasons including human rights violations includes the defense minister, his deputy minister and more than 110 officers, according to people familiar with the list.The purge orders, seen as one of the most serious tests of civilian authority over the armed forces, have raised tensions to a new level here as a series of important deadlines, established in the peace accord reached last year, slip by."
NEWS
By Tim Golden and Tim Golden,New York Times News Service | March 15, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- A United Nations-sponsored investigation into the most notorious violence of El Salvador's civil war has found active and retired military officers responsible for the killings of thousands of civilians, including the archbishop of San Salvador, people who have seen the report said yesterday night.They said the report names the Salvadoran defense minister, Gen. Rene Emilio Ponce, who offered his resignation Friday, as one of a group of senior officers who ordered the killing of six Jesuit priests in 1989.
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