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By Scott Dance | June 7, 2012
The world is on an El Nino watch, the National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center said Thursday. The global climate pattern is well-known for an inundation of snow it can bring the Baltimore area, though its impacts can be varied. There is a 50 percent chance it could arrive for the first time since 2009 by next winter, according to the climate center. Whether an El Nino is declared depends on surface water temperatures in the Pacific Ocean near the equator. Warmer-than-normal temperatures bring on El Nino, while cooler-than-normal temperatures lead to La Nina.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Climate forecasters still expect El Nino to develop this fall or winter, but the chances have fallen to about two in three. The National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center in College Park on Thursday upheld the El Niño watch it began in March. Temperatures in the eastern Pacific Ocean along the equator continue to be warmer than normal, a key El Niño indicator. However, most of the benchmarks climate scientists use to track and predict El Niño waned somewhat in July.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Climate forecasters canceled an El Nino watch Thursday, with the climate phenomenon no longer expected to arrive this winter. Recent updates had already indicated El Nino was growing less likely, but the probability it will form has fallen to below 50 percent starting in December. In a monthly outlook published Thursday, the U.S. Climate Prediction Center wrote that while El Nino cannot be ruled out, onset is increasingly unlikely over the next six months. The change in forecast may disappoint snow lovers in Maryland, as El Nino winters are associated with above normal snowfall here.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
A developing El Nino is forecast to suppress tropical storms and hurricanes this summer and fall, contributing to a below-normal storm season, U.S. forecasters said Thursday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts eight to 13 tropical storms will develop in the Atlantic this year, three to six of which will become hurricanes. One or two of those could intensify into what are considered "major" hurricanes. Forecasters urged preparation despite the predictions of a below-average season, citing seasons like 1992, which came at the tail end of an El Nino and brought devastation to Florida with Hurricane Andrew.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
The world has been on watch since June for an El Nino climate pattern to develop by the fall. While it hasn't yet, it could arrive next month, albeit a weak version of it, according to the World Meteorological Organization. Sea surface temperatures in the Pacific (a signal used to determine the presence of an El Nino or La Nina) rose to El Nino levels in July and August, but signs have not yet appeared in the atmosphere, according to a new El Nino update from the WMO. Forecasters consider it more likely that a weak El Nino will develop than that what are considered "neutral" conditions will continue.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 13, 2012
The likelihood of El Nino is increasing, with onset of the climate phenomenon known for snowy winters in these parts expected by fall.  There is "increased confidence" in a weak to moderate El Nino, according to the Climate Prediction Center. Forecasters included the information in an update to the hurricane season outlook issued last week, saying it could impact those storms by late in the season. They expect onset of El Nino by the end of September, though there could be a weeks-long delay in its effects reaching the Atlantic.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
The likelihood of El Nino strengthening this fall and winter fell from about 70 percent to 55 percent in a climate forecast released Thursday. While some indicators show the climate phenomenon has been developing in recent months, others favor more neutral conditions, or at least a weaker El Nino than was previously expected.NOAA's Climate Prediction Center  detailed the forecast in a monthly update  that extends an El Nino watch that has...
NEWS
By RESEARCHED BY FRANK D. ROYLANCE, EMILY HOLMES | November 25, 1997
The El Nino phenomenon has been known for centuries in Peru. Fishermen there noted the arrival of warm Pacific waters, and a season of poor fishing, around Christmas. They named it El Nino - a Spanish reference to the Christ child. This year's event has already caused drought, fires, floods and storms that have killed hundreds of people and caused millions of dollars in damage around the Pacific. But El Nino (pronounced el neen-yo) can also bring benefits, such as a quiet Atlantic hurricane season and tropical game fish in northern waters.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 13, 2012
Severe weather has quieted, so there's not much else for meteorologists to chat about but a few guessing games. And AccuWeather severe weather blogger Henry Margusity's hunch is that there is a link between this month's heat waves across the U.S. and the climatic phenomenon known as the North Atlantic Oscillation. The NAO, which measures the atmospheric pressure difference between the typical low pressure system near Iceland and high pressure south of the Azores, hit its lowest point since 1950 in June, an AccuWeather reader pointed out to Margusity.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Meteorologists are growing increasingly confident that El Nino is brewing - but that doesn't mean they know what kind of weather it might bring Maryland. The climate phenomenon that brings unusually warm water to the Pacific Ocean off South America with weather repercussions that echo globally is showing signs it may develop later this year. Climatologists last week predicted greater than 65 percent odds El Nino will develop this summer, up to 80 percent by late fall. Some speculated it could be the strongest in years.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Meteorologists are growing increasingly confident that El Nino is brewing - but that doesn't mean they know what kind of weather it might bring Maryland. The climate phenomenon that brings unusually warm water to the Pacific Ocean off South America with weather repercussions that echo globally is showing signs it may develop later this year. Climatologists last week predicted greater than 65 percent odds El Nino will develop this summer, up to 80 percent by late fall. Some speculated it could be the strongest in years.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
The National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center on Thursday placed the globe on El Niño watch, with a 50 percent chance of the global climate pattern developing by summer or fall. El Nino is characterized by above-average Pacific Ocean surface temperatures along the equator, just west of South America. It can cause climate patterns that contribute to extreme weather around the world, with some areas prone to drought or others to flooding, for example. In Maryland and the Northeast, El Niño is perhaps best known for bringing snowy winters -- though that's not required, as this snowy winter occurred under what are considered "neutral" conditions, with neither El Niño or La Niña present.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
The lack of an El Nino or La Nina global climate pattern makes for an unpredictable winter in Maryland and many other parts of the country, according to a NOAA season outlook released Thursday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center in College Park is calling for equal chances for above- and below-normal precipitation and temperatures this winter in the mid-Atlantic. "This year's winter outlook has again proved to be quite challenging," Mike Halpert, the climate center's acting director, said on a conference call with reporters.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
The region has had its first flirt with winter weather this week, and now meteorologists are handicapping whether the upcoming season could be the snowiest since 2009-2010, or another dud. In general, Baltimore's snowiest winters occur when high-pressure systems park over Greenland, blocking Arctic air and moisture and sending it further south across the Northeast and mid-Atlantic U.S. This is most common when the climate phenomenon El Nino is...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
It has been a year since the climate pattern known as La Nina ended, the longest period of so-called "neutral" conditions since 2004. And there is no sign of the phenomenon, or its counterpart El Nino, through summer, climate forecasters say. La Nina, known for bringing mild winters to the mid-Atlantic, was last active from August 2011 through April 2012. The phenomenon is marked by warmer-than-average Pacific Ocean surface temperatures around the equator. But since May of last year, those water temperatures have been in "neutral" territory, too cool for a La Nina but not cold enough for El Nino.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Depending on how you look at it, snowfall this winter was either a disappointment or an improvement in Baltimore. The seasonal tally of 8 inches through Monday at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport ranks as the 16th least snowy season on record for Baltimore. It was more than four times as much snow as the winter before, but also the second-smallest season snowfall total in more than a decade. After the winter of 2009-2010 -- that of "Snowmageddon", "Snowverkill" or whatever else you want to call it -- everything else pales in comparison.
NEWS
December 16, 1998
The Chicago Tribune said in an editorial Saturday:THE astonishing American job machine -- the economic equivalent of the meteorological El Nino -- continues to confound. By all rights, the U.S. economy shouldn't have created more than a quarter of a million jobs in November, any more than we should have experienced record high temperatures in December. But it did.Industrial declineThe Asian financial crisis and its double whammy of cheaper imports and evaporating export markets certainly has taken its toll on the manufacturing sector.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | January 11, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- As yet another fierce storm walloped Southern California, the National Weather Service's top experts met yesterday in Maryland to discuss whether the abnormal deluge heralds an unusually wet winter for California.Their conclusion: No one knows."We had the best minds in the Weather Service sitting there -- and we couldn't come to a consensus," said Ants Leetmaa, head of a supercomputing project for the Weather Service in Camp Springs, Md."The science is still inexact, and we hope to improve on that.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
Hot pants, El Nino, Elite Republican Guard and now "fiscal cliff. " When the national news media grabs hold of one of these slogans, they're like a dog with a bone - or your pants leg! They won't let go and will repeat it ad infinitum, as if they know nothing else. Then, it will go away forever. Hot pants came and went in 1971, El Nino did not lead to El Nina, the ERG turned out to be bogus (and ran). Maybe now the fiscal cliff will join the dodo in the dustbin of history. I sure hope so. I'm sick of hearing it already.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
Despite recent indications from climate forecasters that El Nino is looking less likely for the winter, AccuWeather is holding firm predictions of above-normal snowfall for the Northeast because of a persistent weather pattern. Severe weather forecaster Henry Margusity points to the repeated blocking patterns that could continue to dominate throught the winter. The patterns involve high pressure settled over the northern Atlantic and often produce storms like the nor'easter that dumped snow on areas recovering from Hurricane Sandy.
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