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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 14, 2001
In an about-face, a member of the family that clashed with the city over its now-closed El Dorado Lounge strip club has abandoned plans to open a new adult establishment on The Block. Rosalie Jackson notified the city liquor board this week she no longer wants to transfer her liquor license from 322 W. Baltimore St., former site of the El Dorado, to 408 E. Baltimore St., currently home to the 408 Club. Jackson withdrew her Oct. 15 application because she wants to focus on a new venture, Britton's Restaurant, said Lisa Harris Jones, the Jackson family attorney.
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NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 26, 2008
The goal for the No. 14 C. Milton Wright softball team yesterday was to put the ball in play, no easy task against Hammond All-Metro pitcher Stephanie Speierman. The Mustangs were able to do just that, though, scoring three times in the third inning and getting a fine pitching performance from Brittany Favazzo to come away with a 3-0 upset win over the No. 5 Golden Bears. Favazzo allowed just four hits, striking out 12 batters to out-duel Speierman, who went 23-1 last season and pitched a perfect game in the Class 2A state championship game.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Allison Klein and Tom Pelton and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2001
About 50 supporters of the El Dorado strip club gathered outside Baltimore City Hall yesterday evening to complain about the city's plans to close it down for an urban renewal project. City officials had planned to shut down the club at 322 W. Baltimore St. yesterday to make room for apartments as part of Baltimore's $350 million rebuilding of the west side of downtown. But the city moved the date back a week, to Friday, to allow a court hearing Monday on whether to allow the club to remain open until July 11 or later.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh and Thomas H. Maugh,Los Angeles Times | December 10, 2004
Gene Savoy plunged into the Peruvian jungle half a century ago in search of the fabled El Dorado, a lost Inca city so wealthy that its king reputedly walked coated in gold dust. For months at a time, Savoy tromped through mountain terrain that local Indians were reluctant to enter. He was bitten by snakes, lost in the jungle and once nearly lynched by irate campesinos. Now semiretired, Savoy never found El Dorado. But along the way, he became the world's foremost chronicler of a forgotten civilization known as the Chachapoya -- and a blight to traditional archaeologists.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2001
A company controlled by the family of former strip-club manager Kenneth A. Jackson has bought a three-story building on Baltimore's Antique Row for a restaurant that is to feature international cuisine and guest stints by celebrity chefs. The El Dorado Lounge, which has closed, won't be moving from West Baltimore Street to the Howard Street location, said attorney Lisa Harris Jones, who represents the Jackson family and its business, KAJ Inc. The liquor license for 889 N. Howard St. requires that 40 percent of the establishment's sales be from food, and zoning of the site bans adult entertainment businesses there.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2000
Steve Krauth, Jamie Lloyd and Kennard Pak have three things in common: All hail from Maryland, all were involved with animating the luscious backgrounds that are the highlight of DreamWorks' new film, "The Road to El Dorado," and none of them would have listed "animator" as their top career choice. Krauth, who grew up in Pasadena, started out as a computer systems administrator. Lloyd, who once called Annapolis home, spent a year at College Park trying to figure out what he wanted to do, little expecting he'd be able to make a living off those little cartoon figures he used to doodle in his textbooks.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2000
"The Road to El Dorado" is a mess. A handsome, well-drawn mess, but a mess nonetheless. For one thing, it begs the question, "Do we really need an animated Hope and Crosby picture?" For another, it needs a story -- any story, but preferably one the audience can have a rooting interest in. And finally, it proves the truth of the adage that any movie depending on an animated armadillo for excitement is looking for trouble. Set in the early days of New World exploration, "El Dorado" focuses on Miguel and Tulio, Spanish con men who spend 20 percent of their time separating people from their money and 80 percent getting on people's nerves -- especially the audience's.
NEWS
March 16, 2001
YOU CAN visit municipally sanctioned whorehouses in lots of Third World cities. And in some German burgs, the local governments even own high-rises that house courtesans who will indulge your every desire for a few hundred bucks. So maybe Baltimore officials are on to something with their idea to own the El Dorado strip club's building. The bar could be linked on the city's municipal Web site (www.baltimorecity.gov) under "city services." And the rent the city collects from its ill-reputed tenant could be sent to schools or public libraries or -- more appropriately -- to public health clinics.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2001
The Board of Estimates approved yesterday a $250,000 settlement payment to the owners of the former El Dorado Lounge, ending a nettlesome and costly relocation dispute in the ambitious redevelopment of the west side of downtown. KAJ Inc., a company run by the family of former El Dorado manager Kenneth A. Jackson, sued the city in May, seeking $3 million in a claim that the city reneged on a deal to move the strip club from 322 W. Baltimore St. to city-owned property at 19-21 S. Gay St. The Jacksons have agreed to drop the litigation in exchange for the money, and the city is making no commitment to help the family find a new location or obtain an adult entertainment license.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2001
Mayor Martin O'Malley is asking the City Council to pass legislation allowing the rezoning of a city-owned building near The Block, so that it can become the home of a strip club displaced by urban renewal. City officials have spent months trying to find a new location for the El Dorado strip club at 322 W. Baltimore St., which the city is condemning as part of a $350 million effort to rebuild 18 blocks on the west side of downtown. The city and club owners have settled on a vacant, four-story brick building - the site of a former culinary school - at 19 S. Gay St., around the corner from Baltimore's adult entertainment district and a block south of police headquarters.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | August 24, 2003
ON TUESDAY morning, workers and various public officials in hard hats will hold a topping-out ceremony 12 stories above the old Crazy John's lunch counter and the El Dorado Lounge. It's important to mention these anchors of decline now because soon no one will remember they ever existed. In their place comes Bank of America's Centerpoint, a square-block renewal zone, featuring an $80 million, 221-unit luxury apartment tower, a seven-story parking garage, nine restored historic buildings and a new world of shops and restaurants.
NEWS
August 18, 2003
Procedural regularity When the Baltimore County school board meets, it takes full advantage of the time left in the evening. Meetings often stretch for hours, straining more than attention spans. By 10 p.m., 2 1/2 hours into a meeting, everyone is more than ready for a bathroom break, which is sometimes called. Not last Tuesday night, though. Concluding the meeting at 9 p.m., President James R. Sasiadek proudly noted there was no need for a break. Then he invoked parliamentary procedure to end the meeting, saying, "I will take a movement - a move - to adjourn."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 14, 2001
In an about-face, a member of the family that clashed with the city over its now-closed El Dorado Lounge strip club has abandoned plans to open a new adult establishment on The Block. Rosalie Jackson notified the city liquor board this week she no longer wants to transfer her liquor license from 322 W. Baltimore St., former site of the El Dorado, to 408 E. Baltimore St., currently home to the 408 Club. Jackson withdrew her Oct. 15 application because she wants to focus on a new venture, Britton's Restaurant, said Lisa Harris Jones, the Jackson family attorney.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2001
The Board of Estimates approved yesterday a $250,000 settlement payment to the owners of the former El Dorado Lounge, ending a nettlesome and costly relocation dispute in the ambitious redevelopment of the west side of downtown. KAJ Inc., a company run by the family of former El Dorado manager Kenneth A. Jackson, sued the city in May, seeking $3 million in a claim that the city reneged on a deal to move the strip club from 322 W. Baltimore St. to city-owned property at 19-21 S. Gay St. The Jacksons have agreed to drop the litigation in exchange for the money, and the city is making no commitment to help the family find a new location or obtain an adult entertainment license.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2001
A company controlled by the family of former strip-club manager Kenneth A. Jackson has bought a three-story building on Baltimore's Antique Row for a restaurant that is to feature international cuisine and guest stints by celebrity chefs. The El Dorado Lounge, which has closed, won't be moving from West Baltimore Street to the Howard Street location, said attorney Lisa Harris Jones, who represents the Jackson family and its business, KAJ Inc. The liquor license for 889 N. Howard St. requires that 40 percent of the establishment's sales be from food, and zoning of the site bans adult entertainment businesses there.
NEWS
By From staff reports | May 15, 2001
In Baltimore City Ruling allows city to proceed with plans to remove El Dorado A Baltimore Circuit Court judge denied yesterday the El Dorado strip club's request for a restraining order to prohibit the city from closing the club Friday. The decision by Judge M. Brooke Murdock means that the city will proceed with its plans to remove the lounge, which has operated at 322 W. Baltimore St. for 27 years, to make room for the city's west-side urban renewal project, said city solicitor Thurman Zollicoffer.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2000
The women in stiletto heels face a long and difficult road. The El Dorado strip club in Baltimore, faced with eviction for an urban renewal project, has looked over at least four sites for relocation, only to be frustrated by zoning laws and City Council members who don't want it next door. In the wake of a city decision last week to evict the club from 322 W. Baltimore St. by early January, the club is negotiating over a city-owned building in the 300 block of N. Howard St. But the move would require a rezoning vote by the City Council, and developers planning to build apartments in the area might not want strippers working in a nightclub nearby, city officials say. The result: Advocates for the 26-year-old lounge are threatening a lawsuit they say could cost city taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars or more - the owners claim the earning potential of the business makes it worth $2.3 million - if the family-owned club is forced to close.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Allison Klein and Tom Pelton and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2001
About 50 supporters of the El Dorado strip club gathered outside Baltimore City Hall yesterday evening to complain about the city's plans to close it down for an urban renewal project. City officials had planned to shut down the club at 322 W. Baltimore St. yesterday to make room for apartments as part of Baltimore's $350 million rebuilding of the west side of downtown. But the city moved the date back a week, to Friday, to allow a court hearing Monday on whether to allow the club to remain open until July 11 or later.
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