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NEWS
By Robert L. Pollock | September 28, 2001
IN THE wake of the horrific events of Sept. 11, there has been a great deal of debate about how to prevent airline hijackings. I decided to seek advice from someone who has done just that -- a retired El Al captain named Uri Bar-Lev. He was caught up in a mass airline hijacking that occurred exactly 31 years ago to the week before the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon. In September 1970, the Palestine Liberation Organization seized control of four airliners over Europe, flew them to Jordan and Egypt, and then blew them up. Fortunately the passengers were released unharmed -- but not before being used as bargaining chips to win the release of PLO terrorists held in European jails.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 3, 2013
You can have your women in combat. You can have your women who lean in. You can even have your woman secretary of state who visits 112 countries. But my new heroes are women on planes with babies. Flying back and forth across the country over the holiday weekend, I met a lot of these road warriors. It seemed their children were never in a good mood, and neither, I'm guessing, were the childless passengers who suddenly found the plane had become an airborne day care center. Just imagine if every time you boarded a plane, you knew nobody in the cabin wanted to sit near you. That they'd rather sit next to the snoring fat guy who takes up a seat and a half than you and your babies.
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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 7, 1994
TEL AVIV -- The Israeli government said yesterday it plans to sell its national flag carrier, El Al Israel Airlines, to the public, keeping only a so-called "golden share."The government plans initially to sell 51 percent of the carrier and the rest at a later date. A statement issued by the Israeli transport ministry did not say when the first tranche would be sold, but the Israeli daily newspaper Telegraph reported that the government intended to sell the initial 51 percent by year-end.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 6, 2002
WASHINGTON - The fatal shooting attack at the El Al ticket counter at Los Angeles International Airport on the Fourth of July has sharpened the debate over what kinds of violent crimes should be considered acts of terrorism. Federal authorities refused yesterday to classify the attack as a case of terrorism, even though they said the gunman had gone to the airport intending to kill. In their remarks, U.S. officials indicated that in their view, terrorism involves solely those crimes committed by people linked to terrorist groups.
BUSINESS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer Staff writer John H. Gormley Jr. contributed to this article | March 7, 1992
El Al Israel Airlines is considering flying out of Baltimore-Washington International Airport, a move that could lead to direct flights from Baltimore to Tel Aviv.Talks are continuing and details have not been worked out with state transportation officials, but "a final decision will be made in a week or two," a spokeswoman for the airline, Sheryl Stein, said.News that El Al airlines is close to a decision pleased state officials, who for the past two years have been working to boost the international stature of BWI."
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | March 20, 1992
After years of courtship, Maryland officials have finally succeeded in wooing El Al Israel Airlines to Baltimore.Airline representatives and state officials announced yesterday that the company will offer connecting service via North American Airlines from Baltimore-Washington International Airport to New York and on to Tel Aviv beginning June 22.The twice-weekly flights will make it easier for Marylanders to travel to Israel by reducing layover times and...
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1997
El Al Israel Airlines will continue flying to Tel Aviv from BWI, after a deal was struck yesterday between the United States and Israel.The U.S. Department of Transportation reauthorized El Al service from Baltimore-Washington International Airport, as well as airports in Orlando, Fla., and Dallas-Fort Worth, after its Israeli counterpart granted permission for New York-based Tower Air to begin flights to Tel Aviv this summer."
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2001
Its ticket prices are the highest and its security hurdles the most time-consuming. Yet while other airlines flew half-empty planes and struggled for survival this week, Israel's El Al thrived, filling its jumbo jets and adding flights to handle the overflow. Never mind that terrorists are more likely to target the airline than any other in the world, as a symbol of Israel. El Al's security system is the gold standard. As U.S. officials looked to it this week as a possible model for the future, travelers scrambled to cancel their tickets on such venerable airlines as British Airways, and flocked to El Al. "Sixty [percent]
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF Joshua Brilliant contributed to this article from Jerusalem | June 6, 1997
Despite strong objections by Maryland officials, the U.S. Department of Transportation has rescinded approval for El Al Israel Airlines' twice-weekly service between Baltimore and Tel Aviv.The action was taken in retaliation for a decision by Israeli authorities not to approve a New York-Athens-Tel Aviv route by New York-based Tower Air starting this summer. The final order, issued by federal transportation authorities yesterday, also affects Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport and Orlando International Airport.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 6, 2002
WASHINGTON - The fatal shooting attack at the El Al ticket counter at Los Angeles International Airport on the Fourth of July has sharpened the debate over what kinds of violent crimes should be considered acts of terrorism. Federal authorities refused yesterday to classify the attack as a case of terrorism, even though they said the gunman had gone to the airport intending to kill. In their remarks, U.S. officials indicated that in their view, terrorism involves solely those crimes committed by people linked to terrorist groups.
NEWS
By Robert L. Pollock | September 28, 2001
IN THE wake of the horrific events of Sept. 11, there has been a great deal of debate about how to prevent airline hijackings. I decided to seek advice from someone who has done just that -- a retired El Al captain named Uri Bar-Lev. He was caught up in a mass airline hijacking that occurred exactly 31 years ago to the week before the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon. In September 1970, the Palestine Liberation Organization seized control of four airliners over Europe, flew them to Jordan and Egypt, and then blew them up. Fortunately the passengers were released unharmed -- but not before being used as bargaining chips to win the release of PLO terrorists held in European jails.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2001
Its ticket prices are the highest and its security hurdles the most time-consuming. Yet while other airlines flew half-empty planes and struggled for survival this week, Israel's El Al thrived, filling its jumbo jets and adding flights to handle the overflow. Never mind that terrorists are more likely to target the airline than any other in the world, as a symbol of Israel. El Al's security system is the gold standard. As U.S. officials looked to it this week as a possible model for the future, travelers scrambled to cancel their tickets on such venerable airlines as British Airways, and flocked to El Al. "Sixty [percent]
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1997
El Al Israel Airlines will continue flying to Tel Aviv from BWI, after a deal was struck yesterday between the United States and Israel.The U.S. Department of Transportation reauthorized El Al service from Baltimore-Washington International Airport, as well as airports in Orlando, Fla., and Dallas-Fort Worth, after its Israeli counterpart granted permission for New York-based Tower Air to begin flights to Tel Aviv this summer."
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF Joshua Brilliant contributed to this article from Jerusalem | June 6, 1997
Despite strong objections by Maryland officials, the U.S. Department of Transportation has rescinded approval for El Al Israel Airlines' twice-weekly service between Baltimore and Tel Aviv.The action was taken in retaliation for a decision by Israeli authorities not to approve a New York-Athens-Tel Aviv route by New York-based Tower Air starting this summer. The final order, issued by federal transportation authorities yesterday, also affects Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport and Orlando International Airport.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 19, 1996
JERUSALEM -- It was the day before the Israeli election in 1988. Shimon Peres of the Labor Party was tied in the polls with Yitzhak Shamir of the Likud bloc. In Jericho, a public bus slowed because of rocks in the road. Suddenly, several homemade petrol bombs crashed through the windows, setting the bus afire.Rahel Weiss refused to leave the inferno without her three young children. All perished, along with a young soldier who tried to save them. Shimon Peres lost the election the next day.Peres, again running in a close campaign for prime minister, blames the Jericho bus attack for his loss in 1988.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 7, 1994
TEL AVIV -- The Israeli government said yesterday it plans to sell its national flag carrier, El Al Israel Airlines, to the public, keeping only a so-called "golden share."The government plans initially to sell 51 percent of the carrier and the rest at a later date. A statement issued by the Israeli transport ministry did not say when the first tranche would be sold, but the Israeli daily newspaper Telegraph reported that the government intended to sell the initial 51 percent by year-end.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 19, 1996
JERUSALEM -- It was the day before the Israeli election in 1988. Shimon Peres of the Labor Party was tied in the polls with Yitzhak Shamir of the Likud bloc. In Jericho, a public bus slowed because of rocks in the road. Suddenly, several homemade petrol bombs crashed through the windows, setting the bus afire.Rahel Weiss refused to leave the inferno without her three young children. All perished, along with a young soldier who tried to save them. Shimon Peres lost the election the next day.Peres, again running in a close campaign for prime minister, blames the Jericho bus attack for his loss in 1988.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent Yael Ashkenazi in the Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun contributed to this article | January 22, 1991
TEL AVIV, Israel -- Victor and Shirley Hasson pleaded with their daughter to leave here."We begged her, if you won't do it for yourself, do it for your son," said Mrs. Hasson. She and her husband, a postman from Portland, Ore., flew to Israel to be with their daughter as the gulf crisis neared. Now they were going."We begged her to leave with us. But she said she would never leave Israel, never leave her husband," Mrs. Hasson said. "But she said she would let us take our grandson back to the states."
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | March 20, 1992
After years of courtship, Maryland officials have finally succeeded in wooing El Al Israel Airlines to Baltimore.Airline representatives and state officials announced yesterday that the company will offer connecting service via North American Airlines from Baltimore-Washington International Airport to New York and on to Tel Aviv beginning June 22.The twice-weekly flights will make it easier for Marylanders to travel to Israel by reducing layover times and...
BUSINESS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer Staff writer John H. Gormley Jr. contributed to this article | March 7, 1992
El Al Israel Airlines is considering flying out of Baltimore-Washington International Airport, a move that could lead to direct flights from Baltimore to Tel Aviv.Talks are continuing and details have not been worked out with state transportation officials, but "a final decision will be made in a week or two," a spokeswoman for the airline, Sheryl Stein, said.News that El Al airlines is close to a decision pleased state officials, who for the past two years have been working to boost the international stature of BWI."
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