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By Milton Kent | December 2, 2000
Three days after sending him packing, the Washington Wizards yesterday reacquired former Maryland player Obinna Ekezie. Ekezie, a 6-foot-9 forward, was traded by the Wizards just before Tuesday's loss to the Atlanta Hawks, along with center Cherokee Parks to the Los Angeles Clippers for forward Tyrone Nesby. However, the Clippers almost immediately cut Ekezie, who came to Washington in August from Vancouver. The Wizards, who never filled the open roster spot after the deal for Nesby, immediately claimed him off waivers yesterday.
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By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
COLLEGE PARK - Jamar Smith finished last season with some solid efforts against Xavier and Michigan State in the NCAA tournament. He might finish this one as an afterthought. Wake Forest doesn't have a scholarship senior on its roster, and Maryland might as well not have had one during the last 19 minutes at the Comcast Center yesterday. Last season was Smith's first as a transfer from Allegany Community College. He frequently made his presence felt in the low post. He has started every game at center for the fading Terps this season, and yesterday his eight-minute contribution produced one assist and one blocked shot.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | November 16, 1994
COLLEGE PARK -- Obinna Ekezie, a 6-foot-10, 280-pound basketball center from Nigeria, is expected to sign a national letter of intent today with the University of Maryland, sources said yesterday.Ekezie, who has played the past two seasons at Worcester (Mass.) Academy, apparently chose Maryland over Connecticut, George Washington and Rice.Maryland coach Gary Williams declined to comment yesterday, as did Tom Blackburn, Ekezie's coach at Worcester Academy.Today is the last day a player can sign with a school until the next signing period in April.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | December 2, 2000
Three days after sending him packing, the Washington Wizards yesterday reacquired former Maryland player Obinna Ekezie. Ekezie, a 6-foot-9 forward, was traded by the Wizards just before Tuesday's loss to the Atlanta Hawks, along with center Cherokee Parks to the Los Angeles Clippers for forward Tyrone Nesby. However, the Clippers almost immediately cut Ekezie, who came to Washington in August from Vancouver. The Wizards, who never filled the open roster spot after the deal for Nesby, immediately claimed him off waivers yesterday.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | February 12, 1999
No basketball player deserves to have his college career end as Maryland center Obinna Ekezie's did earlier this week, with a ruptured Achilles' tendon suffered in practice.But Ekezie was particularly undeserving of such a harsh fate just weeks before his ultimate payoff, a trip to March Madness as a senior on a Top 10 team.Ekezie, from Port Harcourt, Nigeria, has given the Maryland program four good years on the court and four even better years off the court, a contribution worth framing.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | March 14, 1999
ORLANDO, Fla. -- A year ago, the Maryland Terrapins needed Obinna Ekezie to reach the Sweet 16. Yesterday, they not only made it without him, but also played a critical juncture of the first half without any center at all.How much longer can the Terps get away with this? For one more game at least, against a St. John's team with no starter taller than 6 feet 7. And seeing as how Auburn barely slipped past Oklahoma State, maybe beyond.The Terps weren't perfect in their 75-63 victory over Creighton, but they again displayed their trademark versatility, overcoming Lonny Baxter's foul trouble, a box-and-one defense on Steve Francis and a surprisingly resilient opponent.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | February 7, 1997
The phone rings at all hours at the Ekezie home in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Friends from the United States shout across the Atlantic, speaking in rushed, excited tones about Obinna's progress at Maryland.Not the academic progress his father so closely monitors.His progress in basketball."Someone called from Houston today," Ekezie's father, Obi, said Tuesday. "He woke himself up at 6 a.m. I get calls from people almost every day."This isn't the way it was supposed to turn out, was it?Obinna, the Terps' 6-foot-10 sophomore center, chose Maryland because it was only one of nine U.S. institutions to offer a double major in business and engineering.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1999
COLLEGE PARK -- The chalk flits across the blackboard, leaving a trail of mind-boggling ciphers and diagrams."OK, now, does everyone understand?" asks the man up front.From his seat, Obinna Ekezie stares and nods. Yes, the squiggles and arrows and X's and O's make sense to Ekezie, the 6-foot-10 senior center on Maryland's basketball team last season.In fact, this might have been a pre-game pep talk, except that the man at the chalkboard isn't a basketball coach but a college professor -- and the symbols aren't game-winning plays but mathematic equations that would dumbfound Dick Vitale.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1996
COLLEGE PARK -- Obinna Ekezie's quick feet helped navigate Maryland past North Carolina State yesterday.Ekezie, a former soccer player in his adolescent days in Nigeria, helped hold 6-foot-11 senior Todd Fuller, the leading scorer in the Atlantic Coast Conference, to eight points, 14 below his season average.In a game the Terps won in overtime, Ekezie 77-74, it was no small feat."The thing he does pretty well is move his feet," Maryland coach Gary Williams said of Ekezie. "He's got that soccer background.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1995
COLLEGE PARK -- Obinna Ekezie first incurred the wrath of Gary Williams the night Maryland played Towson State at the Baltimore Arena.That was the November evening Ekezie straggled into the Terps' locker room before pre-game warm-ups, several minutes late and well behind the rest of the team.Turned out he had been writing a paper on his laptop computer during the 40-minute bus ride to Baltimore. Williams, the Terps coach, sensed that Ekezie was not prepared to play basketball.So three nights after Ekezie played 20 impressive minutes against then-No.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2000
WASHINGTON - Obinna Ekezie and Cherokee Parks were excused from last night's Washington Wizards game with the Atlanta Hawks at the MCI Center. They were the lucky ones. In an utterly desultory performance, the Wizards sleepwalked their way to a 102-75 loss to the Hawks, one of the candidates for mantle of worst team in the league, who ended a 22-game road losing streak with the victory. "This is something that we know is unacceptable in any walk of life, and especially performing at the level that we need to perform at night in and night out to be successful," said Washington coach Leonard Hamilton.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1999
COLLEGE PARK -- Obinna Ekezie jumped. He pivoted. He jammed. He threw his weight around in a pickup basketball game against the Terps at Cole Field House. And his heel held up.Seven months after tearing his right Achilles' tendon, Ekezie returned to his old haunt, going full tilt last week for the first time since the injury that cut short his senior season. His return lacked hoopla -- no crowd, cameras or cheerleaders. Just a bunch of Maryland players and Ekezie, Vancouver's No. 2 pick in the NBA draft.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1999
The Baltimore BayRunners took six Baltimore-area players in rounds seven through 24 of yesterday's IBL draft.The team selected Dunbar products Norman Nolan (Virginia, ninth round), Kurk Lee (Towson, 17th), Sean Tyson (Clemson, 19th) and Donta Bright (Massachusetts, 24th). Lake Clifton was represented by Kevin Norris (Miami, Fla., 20th), and Cardinal Gibbons by Steve Rich (Miami, Fla., 21st).In a separate draft of NBA second-rounders, the BayRunners also selected Maryland center Obinna Ekezie, who was taken by the Vancouver Grizzlies in last month's NBA draft.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Mike Klingaman and Christian Ewell and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Yes, that was Maryland's Steve Francis with bitter beer face after being selected with the second pick in the NBA draft.But if you think Francis had it rough, try on the shoes of fellow Terp Laron Profit, who lingered until nearly 11 p.m. before being taken in the second round, the 38th pick, by the Orlando Magic.Late as it came, there was relief just the same, as Profit heard the screams from inside his home in Dover, Del., when he was picked."I'm happy to be going there," he said.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
COLLEGE PARK -- The scar curls down his right heel, a raised trail mindful of a lizard's scaly tail or a stretch of the Appalachians on a topographical map.Obinna Ekezie runs his finger over the six-inch scar, a keepsake of the injury to his Achilles' tendon that cut short his senior season at the University of Maryland and threatened his hopes for a professional basketball career.Now, with his torn tendon repaired and the NBA draft four days away, Ekezie itches to play. Forced to pace himself during his gradual recovery, he has yet to return to the court, save on a casual basis.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1999
COLLEGE PARK -- The chalk flits across the blackboard, leaving a trail of mind-boggling ciphers and diagrams."OK, now, does everyone understand?" asks the man up front.From his seat, Obinna Ekezie stares and nods. Yes, the squiggles and arrows and X's and O's make sense to Ekezie, the 6-foot-10 senior center on Maryland's basketball team last season.In fact, this might have been a pre-game pep talk, except that the man at the chalkboard isn't a basketball coach but a college professor -- and the symbols aren't game-winning plays but mathematic equations that would dumbfound Dick Vitale.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1998
GREENSBORO, N.C. -- The stroll was as outrageous as a Barry Bonds home run trot. If only the game could have ended then for Maryland and Obinna Ekezie.Maryland's junior center from Lagos, Nigeria, had struggled with his shooting in mid-February, but had come on lately, and he made a statement at the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament.He was scoreless in the first 16 minutes of the second half of yesterday's semifinal loss to North Carolina, however, and furious with himself after his errant pass gave the Tar Heels a 60-59 lead with 3: 36 left.
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1997
COLLEGE PARK -- Depending on whom you asked last night, Maryland's Obinna Ekezie was most effective because he either played with his feet or with his head.The important thing was, Ekezie played.The sophomore center fouled out in three of the previous four games -- all losses. He had just two points and three rebounds in Saturday's 80-68 defeat at Clemson, and he had something to prove last night against Florida State.The statistics showed that Ekezie scored 15 points and grabbed 11 rebounds in Maryland's 73-57 win over the Seminoles at Cole Field House, but a couple of other numbers jumped out even farther.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1999
COLLEGE PARK -- Obinna Ekezie wants to make a splash in the NBA draft in June.First, he must jump in the pool. For Ekezie, who was Maryland's center, the swim he takes three or four times a week in the Campus Recreation Center is far more than a dip. It's therapy to strengthen his right foot and the Achilles' tendon he ruptured at practice Feb. 11.The injury abruptly ended the senior's college basketball career and assured that he'd spend the months preceding...
NEWS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -- Add another frustrating chapter to the University of Maryland's history in the NCAA men's basketball tournament.The winningest Terrapins team ever had its season stopped by St. John's, 76-62, in the semifinals of the South Regional at Thompson-Boling Arena last night. The Red Storm, and not the Terps, will meet Auburn or Ohio State in the South final tomorrow, with the winner moving on to the Final Four next week at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla.The site of the national championship became the stated goal of Maryland last summer, when junior-college transfer Steve Francis arrived on campus to complement several returning starters and expectations soared.
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