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By Bob Klapisch and Bob Klapisch,New York Daily News | October 18, 1993
TORONTO -- He's known as the guy with Tourette's syndrome, but even on Jim Eisenreich's worst days -- when the fans mimicked him and the twitching wouldn't stop -- he always could hit. That was Eisenreich's credential to the big leagues, that quick, short swing that remained beyond the clutches of his disorder. Eisenreich isn't offended by questions about his nervous system, but his universe revolves around baseball and the simple pleasure of crushing an 0-2 fastball.There it was in the third inning last night, an inner-half, belt-level heater from Toronto starter Dave Stewart.
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SPORTS
May 16, 1998
Quote: "These kids listen to me. Unlike my own kids." -- Utility outfielder Jim Eisenreich, on working with the Marlins' younger players.It's a fact: The Marlins have scored first in 22 games, but are only 5-17 in those games.Who's hot: The Reds' Eddie Taubensee is 10-for-15 in his past four games and is hitting .382 this season.Who's not: The Cubs' Jeremi Gonzalez gave up eight runs in 1 2/3 innings to raise his ERA from 4.38 to 5.98.On deck: The Cardinals reportedly are talking to the Pirates about acquiring Esteban Loaiza or Jon Lieber to strengthen their rotation.
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SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | October 18, 1993
TORONTO -- World Series moments don't get any better than this. From 1984 to '86, Jim Eisenreich played for his town team in St. Cloud, Minn. Last night, he hit the three-run homer that broke open Game 2 of the World Series.Suffice it to say that there has rarely been a World Series hero as inspiring as Eisenreich, the Philadelphia right fielder who suffers from the rare neurological disorder known as Tourette's syndrome.Eisenreich, 34, endured a nightmarish first three seasons after making his major-league debut with Minnesota in '82. He went on the voluntary retired list in June of '84, and didn't resurface until signing with Kansas City in '87.But there he was last night, batting with one out in the third inning, crushing an 0-2 fastball from Dave Stewart over the center-field wall to give the Phillies a 5-0 lead in a game they won, 6-4."
FEATURES
April 8, 1998
The Trophy CaseHow many awards has Michael Jordan won?Ivan Ward, 13Marquand, MissouriMichael has won more than 130 sports awards, including:* four NBA Most Valuable Player awards,* five NBA Finals MVP awards,* three NBA All-Star MVP awards,* the NBA Rookie of the Year award.He was also the MVP of his Dixie League baseball team, at age 12!Every time slugger Jim Eisenreich of the Florida Marlins steps into the batter's box, before the first pitch, he swings his bat not once, not twice, not three times . . . but four times!
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman | October 18, 1993
TORONTO -- There was no mystery about the key play in Game 2 of the World Series. The three-run home run by Jim Eisenreich that capped a five-run third inning by the Phillies established the tone of the game early.The circumstances surrounding the game-breaker were what made it unusual. Eisenreich, a left-handed batter, is not considered a home-run threat, and right-hander Dave Stewart has been a master in avoiding the big inning.Stewart had given up two runs on flared singles by John Kruk and Dave Hollins.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
CLEVELAND -- As Florida manager Jim Leyland explained his decision to make Jim Eisenreich his designated hitter last night, he pointed out that the veteran wasn't ideal for the job "because he's not a power hitter."Try telling that to Charles Nagy.The Cleveland right-hander was taken deep by Eisenreich in the sixth inning, the two-run homer cutting the Indians' lead in half. Five batters later, it was gone, though it lasted longer than Nagy.Eisenreich, with only two home runs in 293 at-bats this season, had painted a new face on Game 3 of the World Series.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | October 18, 1993
TORONTO -- Philadelphia Phillies outfielder Jim Eisenreich retired from baseball nine years ago at the age of 25, which rates him a special place in the pantheon of unlikely World Series heroes.Obviously, he didn't stay retired. He came back from a serious nervous disorder to rebuild his baseball career and arrive at his moment in baseball history last night. His three-run home run off Dave Stewart in a five-run third inning made the difference in a 6-4 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays in Game 2 at SkyDome.
FEATURES
April 8, 1998
The Trophy CaseHow many awards has Michael Jordan won?Ivan Ward, 13Marquand, MissouriMichael has won more than 130 sports awards, including:* four NBA Most Valuable Player awards,* five NBA Finals MVP awards,* three NBA All-Star MVP awards,* the NBA Rookie of the Year award.He was also the MVP of his Dixie League baseball team, at age 12!Every time slugger Jim Eisenreich of the Florida Marlins steps into the batter's box, before the first pitch, he swings his bat not once, not twice, not three times . . . but four times!
SPORTS
May 16, 1998
Quote: "These kids listen to me. Unlike my own kids." -- Utility outfielder Jim Eisenreich, on working with the Marlins' younger players.It's a fact: The Marlins have scored first in 22 games, but are only 5-17 in those games.Who's hot: The Reds' Eddie Taubensee is 10-for-15 in his past four games and is hitting .382 this season.Who's not: The Cubs' Jeremi Gonzalez gave up eight runs in 1 2/3 innings to raise his ERA from 4.38 to 5.98.On deck: The Cardinals reportedly are talking to the Pirates about acquiring Esteban Loaiza or Jon Lieber to strengthen their rotation.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | August 30, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- The baseball season is pretty much over up here in Booville with five weeks left, which is the way most people had it figured. Only the figuring was that the Phillies would be furlongs out of first place by now, not so far in front that dozing off was their main concern.Welcome to the blessed event of this major-league season: the Phillies by a mile in the NL East. If you can't see the handiwork of the baseball gods, you just aren't looking.A year ago, the Phillies lost 92 games and finished in last place for the third time in five years.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1997
CLEVELAND -- The Cleveland Indians' postseason media guide introduces Matt Williams by saying what began as a frustrating season turned into one of the most productive years of his career. Ask Williams, and he has a different version."It's probably been the toughest year I've ever been through," he said.Acquired in a trade with the San Francisco Giants that had Bay area fans howling in disapproval, Williams finished the regular season with a .263 average, 32 homers and 105 RBIs, and won his fourth Gold Glove at third base.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
CLEVELAND -- As Florida manager Jim Leyland explained his decision to make Jim Eisenreich his designated hitter last night, he pointed out that the veteran wasn't ideal for the job "because he's not a power hitter."Try telling that to Charles Nagy.The Cleveland right-hander was taken deep by Eisenreich in the sixth inning, the two-run homer cutting the Indians' lead in half. Five batters later, it was gone, though it lasted longer than Nagy.Eisenreich, with only two home runs in 293 at-bats this season, had painted a new face on Game 3 of the World Series.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | June 2, 1994
Where have you gone, Larry Sheets?Jim Dwyer?John Lowenstein?For that matter, where have you gone, Joe Orsulak and David Segui?Any of the above would look good in an Orioles uniform right now -- yes, even Brother Lowe at the age of 47.Once upon a time, the Orioles took pride in their left-handed hitters off the bench.Suddenly, they can't even find one at Triple-A.Club officials are now furiously trying to correct a deficiency they should have addressed last winter. Their wish list contains several names, the most attainable of which might be California outfielder Dwight Smith.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman | October 18, 1993
TORONTO -- There was no mystery about the key play in Game 2 of the World Series. The three-run home run by Jim Eisenreich that capped a five-run third inning by the Phillies established the tone of the game early.The circumstances surrounding the game-breaker were what made it unusual. Eisenreich, a left-handed batter, is not considered a home-run threat, and right-hander Dave Stewart has been a master in avoiding the big inning.Stewart had given up two runs on flared singles by John Kruk and Dave Hollins.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | October 18, 1993
TORONTO -- Philadelphia Phillies outfielder Jim Eisenreich retired from baseball nine years ago at the age of 25, which rates him a special place in the pantheon of unlikely World Series heroes.Obviously, he didn't stay retired. He came back from a serious nervous disorder to rebuild his baseball career and arrive at his moment in baseball history last night. His three-run home run off Dave Stewart in a five-run third inning made the difference in a 6-4 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays in Game 2 at SkyDome.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | October 18, 1993
TORONTO -- World Series moments don't get any better than this. From 1984 to '86, Jim Eisenreich played for his town team in St. Cloud, Minn. Last night, he hit the three-run homer that broke open Game 2 of the World Series.Suffice it to say that there has rarely been a World Series hero as inspiring as Eisenreich, the Philadelphia right fielder who suffers from the rare neurological disorder known as Tourette's syndrome.Eisenreich, 34, endured a nightmarish first three seasons after making his major-league debut with Minnesota in '82. He went on the voluntary retired list in June of '84, and didn't resurface until signing with Kansas City in '87.But there he was last night, batting with one out in the third inning, crushing an 0-2 fastball from Dave Stewart over the center-field wall to give the Phillies a 5-0 lead in a game they won, 6-4."
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | June 2, 1994
Where have you gone, Larry Sheets?Jim Dwyer?John Lowenstein?For that matter, where have you gone, Joe Orsulak and David Segui?Any of the above would look good in an Orioles uniform right now -- yes, even Brother Lowe at the age of 47.Once upon a time, the Orioles took pride in their left-handed hitters off the bench.Suddenly, they can't even find one at Triple-A.Club officials are now furiously trying to correct a deficiency they should have addressed last winter. Their wish list contains several names, the most attainable of which might be California outfielder Dwight Smith.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1997
CLEVELAND -- The Cleveland Indians' postseason media guide introduces Matt Williams by saying what began as a frustrating season turned into one of the most productive years of his career. Ask Williams, and he has a different version."It's probably been the toughest year I've ever been through," he said.Acquired in a trade with the San Francisco Giants that had Bay area fans howling in disapproval, Williams finished the regular season with a .263 average, 32 homers and 105 RBIs, and won his fourth Gold Glove at third base.
SPORTS
By Bob Klapisch and Bob Klapisch,New York Daily News | October 18, 1993
TORONTO -- He's known as the guy with Tourette's syndrome, but even on Jim Eisenreich's worst days -- when the fans mimicked him and the twitching wouldn't stop -- he always could hit. That was Eisenreich's credential to the big leagues, that quick, short swing that remained beyond the clutches of his disorder. Eisenreich isn't offended by questions about his nervous system, but his universe revolves around baseball and the simple pleasure of crushing an 0-2 fastball.There it was in the third inning last night, an inner-half, belt-level heater from Toronto starter Dave Stewart.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | August 30, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- The baseball season is pretty much over up here in Booville with five weeks left, which is the way most people had it figured. Only the figuring was that the Phillies would be furlongs out of first place by now, not so far in front that dozing off was their main concern.Welcome to the blessed event of this major-league season: the Phillies by a mile in the NL East. If you can't see the handiwork of the baseball gods, you just aren't looking.A year ago, the Phillies lost 92 games and finished in last place for the third time in five years.
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