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By Eileen Pollock | January 13, 2014
Eight months ago I exchanged my posh Lincoln Center zip code (10023) and 212 area code for Baltimore's 21209 and 410. This is my new/old city - I was raised here but spent my working life in New York. When I was laid off from a legal administrative assistant job in New York, it made sense to move back to the Baltimore area. Here, I am combining my continuing job search with giving of my time to worthwhile organizations. Meanwhile I cannot help but observe the differences between living in an exciting world capital with living in a - well, smaller city.
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NEWS
January 25, 2014
Nothing illustrates The Sun's blindness to safety on Baltimore's streets than two items in the newspaper in recent weeks. The letter from Carol Baker ("Safe in Baltimore," Jan. 18) was an answer to Eileen Pollock's previous piece on the lack of safety for Baltimore's citizens. Ms. Baker provides her personal evidence about living in Baltimore for 30 years and never being mugged and other quality of life benefits for living here and suggests Ms. Pollock should move away if she's so concerned.
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NEWS
January 18, 2014
I have 300 years of family history in Central Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania. I lived in New York City for four years. Eileen Pollock is on target - Baltimore is the only large city Maryland has and should not be neglected ("Baltimore is no New York," Jan. 13). I questioned in the 1960s after completing college why jobs were leaving Baltimore and was patronizingly told, "There will be plenty of jobs left, little girl. " A sadness and regret of my older years has been the lack of interest by Marylanders (including politicians)
NEWS
January 18, 2014
I have 300 years of family history in Central Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania. I lived in New York City for four years. Eileen Pollock is on target - Baltimore is the only large city Maryland has and should not be neglected ("Baltimore is no New York," Jan. 13). I questioned in the 1960s after completing college why jobs were leaving Baltimore and was patronizingly told, "There will be plenty of jobs left, little girl. " A sadness and regret of my older years has been the lack of interest by Marylanders (including politicians)
NEWS
January 16, 2014
I heartily agree with Eileen Pollock when she says that she can't overstate how pleasant Baltimoreans are ("Baltimore is no New York," Jan.14). I moved to Baltimore from out of state seven years ago and have been struck by the friendliness and helpfulness of everyone. Ms. Pollock then proceeds to make some generalizations about daily life in Baltimore, unsupported by evidence, and seems to contradict her initial description of the city as a relaxed, friendly place. She says Baltimore is totally car dependent while New York is easy to navigate on public transportation.
NEWS
January 25, 2014
Nothing illustrates The Sun's blindness to safety on Baltimore's streets than two items in the newspaper in recent weeks. The letter from Carol Baker ("Safe in Baltimore," Jan. 18) was an answer to Eileen Pollock's previous piece on the lack of safety for Baltimore's citizens. Ms. Baker provides her personal evidence about living in Baltimore for 30 years and never being mugged and other quality of life benefits for living here and suggests Ms. Pollock should move away if she's so concerned.
NEWS
May 20, 2014
Susan Reimer 's column on elevator etiquette omits the cardinal rule of etiquette I saw riding a multitude of elevators over the years in New York City ( "Elevator etiquette dropping fast," May 16). In Class A office buildings like the Chrysler Building, men - in that hard-boiled, the faster-the-better city - have preserved an act of unexpected politeness. No gentleman steps into an elevator before a lady in New York. Ladies board first. How 1886! Eileen Pollock, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
June 25, 2014
In response to Susan Reimer 's interesting column about the tendency of women to apologize to excess ( "What are women apologizing for?" June 23), I have observed this lack of confidence in the behavior of mothers trying to control unruly children in public. They invariably append the suffix, "OK?" to their "request" for better behavior. It only weakens the direction to your child and confuses him or her as to what is right. What mom says is right and she needn't ask her child's permission (OK?
NEWS
February 19, 2012
I read with interest Eileen Pollock's essay about retiring to Baltimore ("Why I'm thinking about retiring to Baltimore," Feb. 17). My hat's off to her for espousing Baltimore's strengths instead of the usual (and frankly, tiresome) complaint about the city's high taxes. Look at what downtown Baltimore alone has to offer: Four colleges and universities, easy proximity via MARC train to the District of Columbia, museums, symphony, wonderful restaurants, two major sports stadiums, four Circulator bus routes providing free transportation (see if you can find that in Manhattan)
NEWS
February 21, 2012
Eileen Pollock's ruminations on her possible retirement to Baltimore ("Retirees can boost Baltimore's population," Feb. 16) draws similar but reverse parallels to my own life choices. I too grew up in Baltimore, having been born there in 1950, and like Ms. Pollack I have a history with Hopkins (I retired from the institution). However, I moved to Chincoteague, Va., upon my own retirement, for many of the same reasons Ms. Pollock contemplates returning to Baltimore from New York City.
NEWS
January 16, 2014
I heartily agree with Eileen Pollock when she says that she can't overstate how pleasant Baltimoreans are ("Baltimore is no New York," Jan.14). I moved to Baltimore from out of state seven years ago and have been struck by the friendliness and helpfulness of everyone. Ms. Pollock then proceeds to make some generalizations about daily life in Baltimore, unsupported by evidence, and seems to contradict her initial description of the city as a relaxed, friendly place. She says Baltimore is totally car dependent while New York is easy to navigate on public transportation.
NEWS
By Eileen Pollock | January 13, 2014
Eight months ago I exchanged my posh Lincoln Center zip code (10023) and 212 area code for Baltimore's 21209 and 410. This is my new/old city - I was raised here but spent my working life in New York. When I was laid off from a legal administrative assistant job in New York, it made sense to move back to the Baltimore area. Here, I am combining my continuing job search with giving of my time to worthwhile organizations. Meanwhile I cannot help but observe the differences between living in an exciting world capital with living in a - well, smaller city.
NEWS
January 8, 2014
The title of your editorial recommending leniency for teenage jihadist Mohammad Hassan Khalid focused on the tender age of the would-be terrorist, saying he has paid the price for his involvement in aiding terrorism by losing his scholarship and facing the prospect of being deported ( "The teenage terrorist," Jan. 6). Yet he has not paid the price. You cite the help he has given law enforcement but fail to note that he acted with full knowledge of "multiple important targets including individuals and media associated with Al Qaeda" in order to give such help.
NEWS
January 15, 2014
My elation quickly soured as I read commentator Eileen Pollock's assessment of life in Baltimore following her return to the city after years of living in Manhattan ( "Baltimore is no New York," Jan. 13). I agree that we desperately need more public transportation options and that drivers are oblivious to pedestrians. But her claims of people being afraid to go out at night are greatly exaggerated. If that were the case, the symphony, the downtown restaurants and most other night life would be shuttered and the streets empty.
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